Ritchey WCS Seatposts

Available At:
WCS

  • 1-piece 3D Net forged design
  • 7075 Material
  • 3D Forged Construction
  • 280/300/350/400 Length
  • Low profile clamp

User Reviews (16)

Showing 1-10 of 16  
Trouble   Recreational Rider [Apr 09, 2011]
Strength:

There are none to write about

Weakness:

Everything about the product and especially their customer service.

Had this post with bike for about 3 months. The seat kept slipping ending nose up. I torqued to 16nM, put all kinds of crap on it...nothing worked.
Contacted Ritchey and all they were willing to do is over a new at Race Team Pricing. They don't care about customer service.

Similar Products Used: THompson, THEY are the best and Ritchey knows it.
OVERALL
RATING
1
VALUE
RATING
1
Available At:
Martin Young   Recreational Rider [Sep 26, 2009]
Strength:

Looks sharp. Matches the -17 degree WCS stem. Super light.

Weakness:

Slipping made it unusable until I figured out the problem.

purchased this seatpost several months ago. Kept trying it, but slipping problems forced me to but a thomson for my 27.2 bike. Recently picked up another frame and gave the Ritchey another try. I'd tighten the two bolts until I thought they were locked. But again some slippage. Finally looked at all the contact points. I had already medium sanded all the contact points. The problem turns out to be the extrusions that receive the two bolts on the top plate. The casting is too long and wide. No matter how tight you torque the bolts, the actual contact points are only the two small extrusions going through the middle plate and just gouging the a small point on the flat of the seatpost. The only way to prevent this is to use a thicker diameter seat rail, or do what I did. Carefully file (grind) enough off the corner and end of the extrusions so that they do not contact the lower section. This permits the clamping system to make full contact, the way it was originally designed. BTW, no more slipping. I hate buying something new that doesn't work as intended.

Similar Products Used: Thomson elite=excellent. FSA carbon=nice but carbon. Suntour Superbe=vintage goodie.
OVERALL
RATING
4
VALUE
RATING
4
coolbiker   Road Racer [Sep 03, 2009]
Strength:

looks

Weakness:

slips also after rethightening

Nice looks but it slips and keeps onslipping..........

Similar Products Used: 3t Doric
OVERALL
RATING
3
VALUE
RATING
3
Available At:
Steve-a-Reno   Recreational Rider [Aug 23, 2009]
Strength:

Matches other WCS cockpit parts.
It does it's job.
Strength to hold up my 225 pound carcas.

Weakness:

Lightweight/matching parts come at a price.

Bought the WCS post to match my WCS stem and bar. read these reviews about slippage and procured some Finish Line Fiber Grip for the post into the seat tube, the seat rails and seatpost bolts. I'm 225 (losing weight) and neither the seat nor post has moved since install - yes all torques are correct.
Light enough for me and it "matches"!

Similar Products Used: FSA alloy OEM, Specialized carbon over alum OEM, various MTB posts
OVERALL
RATING
4
VALUE
RATING
4
Tim   Commuter [Jul 01, 2008]
Strength:

Very light.

Weakness:

Slips constantly.

The clamp is useless. The seat slides back constantly. A seatpost is supposed to do one thing, hold the seat in place, and it fails miserably at that. I bought it because I already had Ritchey WCS stem that I got from a friend. When I saw this seatpost on the wall at my LBS I bought it to have a matching set.

PS - I also happen to have a WCS mountain seatpost on my cross bike. I have no complaints about it. It's great.

Similar Products Used: Ritchey WCS mountain post. That thing is great.
OVERALL
RATING
1
VALUE
RATING
3
Available At:
Trouble   Recreational Rider [Nov 03, 2007]
Strength:

Not a one.

Weakness:

Steel bolt screwed into an aluminum carrier. Seat tilts on it's own even when torqued to spec.

Difficult to adjust especially while out riding. The tilt likes to move as your tightening the bolts. The seat will move.
The one bolt stripped on me while I was 45 miles from home and I had to cut the ride short and head back, the seat post sucks and it let me down.
I'll make an attempt to have Ritchey replace the aluminum top, if not I'll buy either a FSA, Campy or Easton...I need the 23-25mm of setback. I so wish Thomson had more setback.

Similar Products Used: Lemond, Thomson, Bontrager
OVERALL
RATING
1
VALUE
RATING
1
ldamelio   Road Racer [Oct 13, 2007]
Strength:

Not really any

Weakness:

Cheap, generic, rebadged, poorly engineered

Identical findings to others who had seat slip backwards at recommended torque and greater. It persisted after I read the review here from the 100 grit sandpaper guy and tried that. (Modern, well-engineered bike components, especially something as simple as a post, shouldn't need to be hacked to work.)Not particularly light, clamp mechanism is simplistic and needs some sort of friction (textured surface or ridges) at interface of lower clamp and post. Overall not as good as a $10.00 Kalloy post. Irony is that I upgraded to this with out of pocket cash when team bike would have come with FSA post which would probably have been fine for free. Might be competent as a road post but definitely not for 'cross, MTB, rough roads or big guys.

Similar Products Used: Every other post I've ever had has worked fine - from OEM cheapos to cheap Kalloys to Campy Record Ti. Favorites and current choices are Thomson (Masterpiece on road, Elite on 'cross bike now) - beautiful, light, superbly engineered.
OVERALL
RATING
1
VALUE
RATING
1
Available At:
sogood   Recreational Rider [Nov 13, 2006]
Strength:

Construction and appearance.

Weakness:

None noted. Although I'd expect the decals to rub off eventually.

Nicely manufactured product. No problems with installation nor usage. Definitely haven't come across any of the slippage issues some have reported. The bolts were all hand tightened with baby allen keys, so no extrodinary torques used.

Similar Products Used: Bianchi seat post that came with the bike.
OVERALL
RATING
5
VALUE
RATING
5
systemBuilder   Road Racer [May 18, 2006]

Rather than whine and moan, did anyone ever think to use some 100 grit sandpaper to rough-up the surface that clamps to the rails ?? This solution has been used by road bike riders for, hmmm, about 50 years, and it always works ...

OVERALL
RATING
4
VALUE
RATING
3
Available At:
hochstes73   Road Racer [May 05, 2006]
Strength:

Pretty, light.

Weakness:

Doesn't hold saddle angle.

This is a review for the 2006 Ritchey WCS alloy seatpost.

I have used Ritchey stems, bars, and wheelsets for a few seasons now and have been quite happy. I decided to retire the Thomson setback and replace it with a Ritchey to match the rest of my cockpit. What a mistake!

After an hour in the saddle I noticed that I was sliding backward quite a bit. Got off the bike and the nose of the saddle was pointing towards the sky! After a week of trying to get the bolts torqued tight enough to hold the correct saddle angle, I have given up.

As it turns out, I am not alone. In discussion with some other local riders - they had the same experience with the new WCS alloy post.

Also, the Ritchey Pro alloy seatpost works much better because the clamping mechanism is slightly different. Same two bolt configuration, but the 'rockers' (that the bolts go through before threading into the clamp) have a jagged surface that 'bites' into the underside of the post thus keeping the saddle tilt in place.

The moral of this story is if you want a Ritchey post that works - get the Ritchey PRO post (either carbon or alloy) and stay away from the WCS.

Similar Products Used: Thomson setback. Ritchey Pro Alloy.
OVERALL
RATING
1
VALUE
RATING
1
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