Rotor Q-Rings Chainrings

Available At:

Rotor Q-Rings Chainrings 

DESCRIPTION

Rotor Q-Rings help to minimize the time spent in the dead spot while pedaling. While oval chainrings have historically been controversial, we believe that allowing a rider to fine tune the chainring position offers opportunities to minimize the dead spot never before realized with conventional chainrings.

USER REVIEWS

Showing 1-10 of 11  
[Aug 16, 2016]
Curtis Wong

Strength:

For several years now I have used Rotor Q Rings installed on different bikes since their introduction to the market. I liked the way it reduces the dead spot on the pedaling stroke and the ability to adjust the intensity by changing the regulation points.

Weakness:

Just recently however, I noticed pain and tightness on my left calf only, my right calf is not affected in any way. Wondering if because the Q rings keep you in the power strong longer this is placing more stress on my left calf muscle. I am going to change to #2 or #1 to see if it help relieve the pain in my left calf. Hopefully this is just individual physical thing and the aging process taking its course, and not related to the rings. Anybody else have this problem?

Other than the above, I like the Q rings.

OVERALL
RATING
4
VALUE
RATING
4
Available At:
[May 24, 2010]
kevin32
Road Racer

Strength:

Better pedal stoke with decreased knee pain. Not sure about the climbing part yet, but I'm smoother and slightly faster on the flats....we'll see. Definitely something that's fun/interesting to try and seems to have some merit.

Weakness:

Shifting is slightly worse, but still good. Price isn't terrible either.

These came on a recent purchase of a compact crankset. I'm using the Aero 52T outer ring and a 36T inner ring. I'm running these on a Look 595 Ultra with full Campy Record 11 speed setup (excluding cranks obviously). For comparison I have a Pinarello Prince with full SR11 setup (Campy 50/34t compact cranks with standard rings) as well.

I'm still testing, but after several long rides (60-80 miles) here is what I've noticed so far. 1) It took almost no time to adjust to the feel of the q-rings and switching between bikes is pretty much effortless. 2) My spinning efficiency is improved on the q-rings, as they simply feel more natural. My cadence did increase a bit and with less effort. 3) My legs were more sore after using at the beginning because I was engaging my hamstrings more, which is where I felt the soreness most. My regular round rings put more emphasis on my quads. However, I starting to find that I'm stronger on my regular rings after riding the q-rings, most likely because my hamstrings are definitely getting stronger from the q-rings. 4) My knees hurt less and I feel less fatigued after long rides. However, this did not happen right away, as you need to finish the break-in period that Rotor describes on their website. 5) Shifting is very good, but definitely a notch down from my full Campy setup. I feel it shifts more like my previous Record 10 group (i.e. less smooth and a bit noisier). I haven't had a single dropped chain after 400 miles. 6) I must admit they look rather cool.

I'm not certain I climb better yet, but will find out after I try the Horrible Hilly 100 next month (200K and 11,000 ft of climbing (18% grades on some parts)). Should be interesting/painfull. I did it last year using Campy Record 10 (compact crank with a 25t on the rear)

Lastly, the inner rings are far less ovalized than the outer, so it's tough to feel the difference between my bikes while climbing. I feel most of the difference when in the big ring. I will try to remember and post how they/I performed.

Similar Products Used:

Dura-Ace 7800, Campy Record 10, Campy SR 11.

OVERALL
RATING
4
VALUE
RATING
4
[Apr 19, 2010]
Hammer Time
Road Racer

Strength:

Pedaling efficiency particularly at max effort

Weakness:

A little pricey

After a knee injury earlier this year I decided to try these to see if they might help in preventing a recurrence. As a road racer I was reluctant to try something that might compromise performance so I put them on a training bike before I rode them in a race. Pedaling in circles on the flats was more efficient but the real surprise came under max effort when out of the saddle climbing and particularly sprinting in a break or for the line. They are definitely smoother under pressure and give confidence that all of the effort is being transferred into forward momentum-there is no sudden and noticeable change in cadence from the top/bottom of the pedal stroke. They might not be everyone's bag but they're not coming off my bike.

Similar Products Used:

The round version

OVERALL
RATING
5
VALUE
RATING
5
[Sep 24, 2009]
makung
Road Racer

Strength:

awesome chainrings great on climbs and time trailing. bit expensive but worth it.

Weakness:

none

When i first saw the q-rings on Carlos Sastre when he won the tour de france 2008. i was amazed. Then i researched on osysmetric rings the bio pace of shimano. too make things short. i bought mine then put them on. On my cervelo Team soloist. I didn't even feel the difference but noticed i could last longer on the big chainring even on big climbs and long flats. even my teammates were surprised that i could keep up with them in the ttt.

Similar Products Used:

dura ace

OVERALL
RATING
5
VALUE
RATING
5
[Jul 26, 2009]
joker
Road Racer

Strength:

better on flats when you get use to them, less stress on knee joints.

Weakness:

I didn't find i would climb as good and definateley did not sprint as fast,made my leg muscles crap up nearly all the time .Far too expensive £148 , not worth the money .

I've had these rings on for two months now,they seem to give less stress to the knees , however they seem to cause more stress to leg muscles and i have been much more prone to cramp when sprinting or climbing ,i'd say i don't climb as well with these or sprint as fast with these, but they do feel smoother if your on flat road or turbo trainer where your sitting down ,i'm going back to round rings , most of the teams in the tdf use round rings , Contador climbs and won on round rings and Cavendish sprints superfast on round rings ,i have gave them a good go though , but not for me as a road racer .

OVERALL
RATING
2
VALUE
RATING
1
[Jul 25, 2009]
knull9
Road Racer

Strength:

They feel smoother and might sometimes give a very small increase in power. Definitely good for the knees. Good quality.

Weakness:

Much too expensive and decrease in shifting performance.

I doubt that they yield any improvement in power output, otherwise the rotor - cervelo test team would have dominated the current tdf, which clearly they did not. Independent research doesn't show any advantage.

Having said that much, I love the smooth feel and when I ride on the rollers, they definitely feel better than round rings. Less pressure on the knees.

Shifting on the road bike is OK, but not great either - however, I once snapped a new top quality Wippermann chain when shifting the front under load - never happened to me with round rings.
They are great on a ss but useless on a mtb in muddy conditions.

The real problem is their price -way to expensive, unless a $100 extra mean nothing to you, they are just not worth it. They recently increased the price even more - are they crazy? I'm going back to round rings on my Mtb.

OVERALL
RATING
3
VALUE
RATING
1
[Dec 14, 2008]
Richard
Recreational Rider

Strength:

Power (approximately 5%), smoother pedaling, less stress on the knees. Quick adjustment from round rings.

Weakness:

None

I did extensive research on the Q-Rings before buying and I could not find anything wrong with them from creditable sources.
I now have 4,600 miles on these and I will not take them off. I am asked often if I am aware that I never shift off my big ring. My response is that when on flat land or rollers, I don't have to shift to my small ring. The Q-Rings give me extra power for the rollers. I also find that my pedaling is smoother and there is less stress on my knees.

Similar Products Used:

None

OVERALL
RATING
5
VALUE
RATING
5
[Jul 16, 2007]
zoomservo
Road Racer

Strength:

complete adjustability to fit any pedaling style. A huge jump in pedaling technology that really gives you more power. It really does.

Weakness:

Shifting on the front is less smooth, as you have to readjust the derailleur (move it up the seat tube just about as high as it will go) to accomodate the virtual 55 tooth sprocket, so you need to push the shift lever and hold it a bit longer on the upshift than with a regular chainring. The price is also a bit steep. There is no color choice except silver. I actually bent the first pair I had, but they were replaced without question and I've had no problems since (I'm a hard sprinter as well)

These things are great. As the instructions say, you need to ride them for 400 miles, then play with positioning. I was starting to feel a bit of pressure in my knees, so I backed them off 1 position, and I've now put on 5,000 miles and never notice them at all - except when the cadence is over 170 then they get slightly more bumpy than round rings, but I don't spend much time up there. But listen to me - they really do work! They give you a virtual 55/36 - even though they index like a 52/39, you get more power on the downstroke and less resistance on the upstroke. That translates into more power and less heartrate - not huge, but at least 5%. You can really go faster, especially on the flats, where your quads are making the pedalstroke seem easier. These things are worth the price because they actually make you faster, unlike 90% of the components you can spend your cash on - I mean, you could easily spend $300 on a carbon stem that isn't going to do anything more for you than a standard Deda Newton, ect. If you have the cash, try them out. But wait at least 400 miles before you get write a review.

Similar Products Used:

FSA. Shimano, etc, round chainrings like everyone else.

OVERALL
RATING
5
VALUE
RATING
5
[Jun 25, 2007]
fff-723
Road Racer

Strength:

starting for 0mph is easier for the first two or three pedalstrokes. Pedaling with one leg is much easier with q-rings. Unfortunately most of the time i I'm pedaling with two legs.

Weakness:

expensive, heavy, changes your way of pedaling without giving a real advantage.

riding about 10000 miles/year, most on my titanium racebike, sometimes on mtb. I did put a set of Q-rings on my racebike. Adaptation was difficult, took me at least 500 miles to get a used to the new way of pedalling. At first I could bearly hold tension on the chain when pedal reached top and at horizontal pos the chain came under tension whith a shock. This was not what I expected. I still find it harder to pedal light, it seems that they are inviting to shift to a bigger gear. I can not say they give me any advantage

Similar Products Used:

only regular

OVERALL
RATING
2
VALUE
RATING
1
[Oct 26, 2006]
Phill Lucas
Road Racer

Strength:

Super light, giving you a lactate and endurance advantage. They also give a fraction more power in sprints, but i notice the lactate effects more.

Weakness:

none that I've experienced. The Rotors still give more torque, but I like the high speed spinning feel of Q's.

I usually have the Rotor cranks on my bikes, but seeing as I was building a weight weenie bike, I decided to go for the Q-Rings. I was impressed by the smooth hi-rev pedalling feel, and the adaption (from rotors) took only 5 minutes.

Similar Products Used:

Rotor RS$, Rotor RS4X, MTB Q-Rings, XTR cranks & rings, XT rings and cranks, Sugino rings and cranks.

OVERALL
RATING
5
VALUE
RATING
5
Showing 1-10 of 11  

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