FSA Energy Compact Cranksets

Available At:

FSA Energy Compact Cranksets 

DESCRIPTION

For excellent power transfer and light weight, FSA's Energy Compact Crankset boasts hollow, cold-forged aluminum crankarms. You also get precision...

USER REVIEWS

Showing 1-9 of 9  
[May 19, 2011]
Aaron Lee
Recreational Rider

Strength:

Value, stiffness, aesthetics

Weakness:

A little noisy

I'm so glad I switched from 53/39 to 50/34! I was able to go up hills with ease that I cramped on before. The FSA energy crank/BB is a great value. I replaced my Campy Centaur with it. It does cause my drivetrain to be a little noisier than with my centaur crankset. No problems with shifting though. Had my LBS install it: lower front deraileur 1/2 cm, make H/L adjustments, retension the chain. I think that was all that was required.

OVERALL
RATING
5
VALUE
RATING
5
[Sep 18, 2010]
tedfava
Road Racer

Strength:

Price, stiffness, looks

Weakness:

None.

Decided to switch out my 53/39 for a compact crank after a battle with Beech Mountain. 50/34 compact gives me the gearing I need to battle rolling hills and mountain passes. Stiff crank set with good power transfer both in and out of the saddle. Have had no issues with paint chipping or chain jump. If you have well tuned components and a chain that is not stretched you will have no problems. Love the crank set and really enjoy the compact gearing (should have done this long ago!).

Similar Products Used:

TruVativ Rouleur carbon crank set

OVERALL
RATING
5
VALUE
RATING
5
[Mar 05, 2006]
cthomas
Recreational Rider

Strength:

MegaExo. Nicer styling. Looks sharp.

Weakness:

Super pro chainrings are noisy. Powdercoat chips easily. BB spindle seems too short. Instructions need improvement.

This review is for the NEW FSA Energy Compact MegaExo. I wanted to upgrade my crankset, and while I wanted a Campy Carbon CT I was concerned about the construction holding up to my 6'5" 250lbs. I liked my Energy crankset, so this seemed a good (if a little pricey) upgrade. First off, the new look is much sleeker than the original blocky shape of the Energy. Extra style points here. The downside is the FSA powdercoat is just as weak as ever. I nicked mine before I ever got it installed. FSA, I love your products, but work on this one. This crank also comes with the new "super pro" semi-solid chainrings that are the upgrade for the new Shimano 10 compatability. (I ride Campy, so I don't care about this). Look great, but VERY "tinny". Just cranking it on my workstand I couldn't believe how loud this seemed. It was like I could hear every link in the chain. I swapped back to the standard FSA rings. The noise went away. So, these get an A for style, but a D for functionality. Now on to the good things. The MegaExo is a terrific design and very easy to install. The BB outboard bearings installed easily, and the crank is extremely easy to install. I also like that the torque requirements are printed on the left crank and the tightening cap. Nice. What is not clear are the instructions for installation, especially the use of the couple of washers with rubber sides. One big one and one small one. It was only after some digging and web research that I figured it out. The big one is a spacer if needed on the DS, and the small one goes NDS. There is also a little green "cap", and I still don't know what it does. I think it is to check the facing of your BB, but I have no idea. The other thing that was a little disconcerting was that when installed the left side crank still has about .75 cm gap as the BB spindle does not seem long enough. This surprised me. It is still very solid, but I would have expected this to be longer and mate up at or close to the outer edge of the crank. Once installed (with my old rings) the crankset rides great. It does not turn as freely as the old Ultegra BB, but that is not noticable at normal rpms. The biggest thing I noticed was that I can't see the big chainring move back and forth under load anymore. This pretty much eliminated an derailleur rub in the front. Overall this crank is nice, but not worth the upgrade from the normal ISIS or Octalink version. Especially not at $200.

Similar Products Used:

Misc. Shimano Octalink cranks. FSA Energy, Carbon Pro, and Gossamer cranks.

OVERALL
RATING
3
VALUE
RATING
2
[Mar 01, 2006]
atpjunkie
Commuter

Strength:

stiff, strong, shifts well. I'm a Clydesdale and I ride hard, she's put up with my abuse just fine.

Weakness:

sometimes get chain drop on downshifts but I'm more inclined to blame the front derailleur.

Was building up a 2nd Cross Bike that I was going to also use as a commuter. Figured with a compact I could have a big enough gear to raod ride, could swith easily to a 48 for cross racing and have a 34 for hillier cross courses. it's done all that without a complaint.

Similar Products Used:

None,first compact road crank, have used more standard and MTB cranks than I care to type

OVERALL
RATING
4
VALUE
RATING
5
[Feb 25, 2006]
pde
Recreational Rider

Strength:

Not impractically macho like a regular double. Light. Stiff.

Weakness:

Shifting requires a lot of thought. A 30x39x52 would offer more natural rings for big hills x cruising x fast riding.

I got these cranks on my first racer type road bike (my daily ride is an old tourer) becuse it was simpler than switching all the bits for a triple crankset. The Energy compacts are light and they feel great with some power going into them. I'm not sure whether a compact was the right call at least for me though. I'm not an unfit cyclist (probably averaging close to 100km per week), but I've already found at least one hill that I could only climb with rest breaks (White Hill Rd, only 170m but 7.5% gradient) running 34 x 26. And there are steeper climbs that one might meet! Will see whether I get better at this game with more time on these wheels, but I'm used to spinning a granny touring gear, and this is less fun. The other problem with a 34x50 w/ 12-26 is that there's an awkward gearing zone in the mid 20kph region. The small ring only gets the bottom 5 gears or so (maybe +1 with trimming). This is more noticeable in urban environments than on the open road. But in those conditions front shifting has to happen frequently and creates big gear jumps. Double shifting (front and back at the same time) helps, but managing that and trimming this requires both practice and attention that distracts from the pleasure of riding. Lastly, I already have a pair of chipped teeth on the big ring after a few hundred km. Not sure of the cause though; it might not have been the crank's fault :).

Similar Products Used:

None really (touring and mtb triple cranksetes; a cheapo 42 x 52 double)

OVERALL
RATING
3
VALUE
RATING
4
[Jan 11, 2006]
dogmeat
Recreational Rider

Strength:

Great value for the buck

Weakness:

I spun out at 42mph, thanks to a big hill and 50mph tailwind. The paint can chip.

Nice crank- I'm using the FSA Platnum bottom bracket- that's nice, too. Stiffer than Ultegra, way cheaper than carbon, and the 34 ring means I can just avoid going to a tripple- I ride rolling hills with some short steep pitches. I liked it so much I bought a 130 bcd FSA Energy for my cyclocross bike.

Similar Products Used:

Shimano Ultegra

OVERALL
RATING
4
VALUE
RATING
5
[Jun 26, 2005]
NoNeedForAName
Recreational Rider

Strength:

Looks Good, Compact

Weakness:

Bent spider and both rings on single fast takeoff from trackstand at stop light.

Good product, probably not meant for sprinters or very strong riders. Thumbs up to FSA for fast warranty of product.

Similar Products Used:

Shimano, Raceface

OVERALL
RATING
3
VALUE
RATING
4
[Jan 23, 2005]
cthomas
Recreational Rider

Strength:

Light, stiff, looks great, compact gearing smooths out the hills and the 50 is a very comfortable chainring. I'm hooked.

Weakness:

None. If you are worried about the lifespan of Octalink, go for the ISIS.

Switched to a Gossamer crankset to give the compact a try, but wanted something a little more stiff. I love the looks of the carbon (and have ridden the FSA carbon cranksets before), but as a big rider want the cranset to be stiff AND durable. I just don't want to worry about it. I also looked at the new Mega-Exo bottom brackets, but decided to wait. Just too new. After trying to find an ISIS bottom bracket as reliable as my trusty Ultegra Octalink BB's have been, I finally just looked and found the Energy in an Octalink spline. Happy I did. The Energy crankset is light and stiff. Out of the saddle it is rock solid, and while I know the "science" of stiffness doesn't back it up it feels way stiffer than the Gossamer. Bottom line...if you are looking for a stiff crankset in a 50/34 gearing this is a great option, especially when it costs HALF of it's carbon cousin.

Similar Products Used:

FSA Gossamer Compact, FSA Carbon Pro, Shimano Dura Ace, Shimano Ultegra, Campy, on and on!

OVERALL
RATING
5
VALUE
RATING
5
[Sep 04, 2004]
zencrow
Road Racer

Strength:

Stiff, perfect gear range, works flawlessly with Campy

Weakness:

None

I switched from a racing triple to the Energy 34/50 compact. The beauty of this is that I went from Campy Mirage and was able to keep the front and rear Der (yes, it's long cage, but it works great) and the ergo shifters. The range of gears is perfect and except for spinning out at about 38 MPH (downhill), there is no down side. Shifts are crisp and the 34/26 I now have for climbing makes the double usable even around here where we have real mountains. The cranks are stiffer than any cranks I have used before and there is not a hint of bottom bracket flex or creak and I am a hammerhead. I will switch the cassette to a 12-25 or even 11-23 at some point, but this is absolutely a terrific crankset even with a little high gear spin out.

Similar Products Used:

Ultegra Cranks, Mirage Racing Triple

OVERALL
RATING
5
VALUE
RATING
5
Showing 1-9 of 9  

THE SITE

ABOUT ROADBIKEREVIEW

VISIT US AT

roadbikereview.com and the ConsumerReview Network are business units of Invenda Corporation

(C) Copyright 1996-2018. All Rights Reserved.