Shimano Dura-Ace FD-7700-B/F Front Derailleur

Dura-Ace FD-7700-B/F

  • Super-Rigid Wide Link Design
  • Replaceable Nickel-Plated Aluminum Alloy Chain Cage

  • User Reviews (5)

    Showing 1-5 of 5  
    basjan   Road Racer [Aug 15, 2003]
    Strength:

    Light, looks good, wide cage adjusts easily...does it's job.

    Weakness:

    Does it's job as good as much cheaper Shimano components, but much worse than cheaper Campy derailleurs.

    This derailleur is superlight and very well finished. I agree with other reviewers below that it is overpriced and under-"performanced". It did it's job, but I have actually switched to a Campagnolo Daytona (third in Campy's hierarchy) derailleur and it works much better! The Campy shifts easier and under more load. I think the Shimano only pushes, while the Campy pushes and lifts the chain. I am not a Campy vs. Shimano advocate, but when one works better than the other, no reason not to switch out. If you look at the inner plate's design, the DA is actually very flat, while the Campy is more contoured, resulting in a better shift. This is the same type of improvment that I noticed when going froma LX front MTB derailleur to the more expensive, but better shifting XTR version.

    Similar Products Used: Campy Daytona, Shimano 105
    OVERALL
    RATING
    3
    VALUE
    RATING
    3
    Dan Dalton   Commuter [Jul 15, 2003]
    Strength:

    good at changing gears...pretty

    Weakness:

    expensive, seemingly intolerant, can't do the washing up or iron shirts

    it's a light, very pretty, braze on front mech that changes gear at high speed under heavy torque, and then back again. it's got some srews, some nuts and bolts, and a nice box. i just wonder whether that's not just a bit too little for something so expensive. if i was reviewing any front mech i'd be saying much the same, it's a fairly simple piece of kit after all, doesn't have to put up with much abuse, no dramatically moving parts and so on. all this talk of super wide front plates and coated bushings just seems like so much guff to fool gullible types like me to part from more cash. problematically, as soon as the drivetrain loses the straight from teh box cleanliness that i can't be bothered to maintain after every ride, it seems to get confused about which gear i want to be in. i'm riding with friction shifters and ta chainrings, which might upset the little princess, but for this money it should be a bit more understanding and love its fellow components, adn it's a worry just as you hit top whack when the chain starts jumping from ring to ring.

    Similar Products Used: 105sc, campag circa 1980 (works just the same...)
    OVERALL
    RATING
    3
    VALUE
    RATING
    3
    Julian Hughes   Recreational Rider [May 30, 2003]
    Strength:

    Look nice. Matches the rest of the groupset. Shiny when new. Has the words Dura Ace on it. Works very well for a few thousand miles.If you change your bike every year(!) you'll remain impressed.

    Weakness:

    Stops working well after a few thousand miles. Where the plate contacts the chain on shifting the shiny plating wears rapidly to reveal the nasty cheap pressing beneath. It vibrates itself apart. The little alloy adjusters love to seize into their little alloy holes. It's expensive.

    Looks nice, works well for a while. Cleverly manufactured to appear to be much higher quality than it really is. A very disappointing and surprisingly bad product. Having had problems on another bike with an Ultegra front derailleur I replaced that one with a Campagnolo Chorus item which doesn't look as cool but works better and keeps on working and is a superior piece of work in *every* respect except appearance. I have now replaced this poor Shimano Dura Ace product with a Campagnolo Daytona item. It *has* to be better!

    Similar Products Used: Ultegra, Campag chorus, LX, XTR
    OVERALL
    RATING
    2
    VALUE
    RATING
    1
    George Friedman-Jimenez   Recreational Rider [Dec 15, 2001]
    Strength:

    Shifts smoothly and reliably, even with nonstandard drivetrain configuration. Construction appears durable.

    Weakness:

    Cost $60 with 1 1/4" adapter. A little heavy with adapter clamp. Requires some extra care in initial adjustment (maybe not, if used as designed, with 118 mm BB and 52/39/30 crank).

    This review is for the newly released Dura-Ace TRIPLE front derailleur, braze-on mount with adapter clamp. This is an excellent derailleur that makes a triple an attractive option for people who like fast group rides and also like to spin up steep hills. This derailleur can be adjusted to shift smoothly while avoiding rubbing of the chain against the cage in all legitimate gear combinations. I was not able to adjust my previous derailleur, the Ultegra triple, to do this. In about 200 miles on varied terrain with this derailleur, I have not missed a front shift yet. It works with Ultegra triple crank 52/42/30 and Ultegra STI levers (which do have adequate fine-tuning click stops, in my experience). To decrease the pedal to pedal width, I was even able to use a 109.5 mm splined double BB rather than the 118 mm recommended for triples. This did take some careful adjustment to avoid the derailleur hitting the seat tube before the chain shifted to the small ring. Highly recommended.

    Similar Products Used: Ultegra triple.
    OVERALL
    RATING
    5
    VALUE
    RATING
    4
    SteveS   Recreational Rider [May 24, 2000]
    Strength:

    Looks and function

    Weakness:

    Cost?

    It is actually hard to critique Shimano derailleurs because they tend to function so well. (Unlike the Ultegra STI levers that rattle like crazy until you glue them down) This is the first clamp on derailleur that I had used in many years, plus it was 9 speed moving up from 7 speed. No problem either way. These have functioned beautifully for me. Compared to some other components, this derailleur is a fairly modest costing upgrade to your drive train.

    Similar Products Used: Previous versions of Dura Ace, 600, and Sante'
    OVERALL
    RATING
    5
    VALUE
    RATING
    5
    Showing 1-5 of 5  

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