Wound Up Threadless Carbon Forks

Threadless Carbon

WOUND UP bonds their X-WOUND straight legs to a 7075 aluminum crown and 7075 dropouts.

User Reviews (18)

Showing 1-10 of 18  
Tobias Souster-Williams   [Sep 16, 2014]
Strength:

Stiff and sexy, clean lines on older bonded lug carbon frames. Great for casual road riders.

Weakness:

Serious riders shouldn't expect more than a couple years life.

Ive had a few Wound up road forks on a few different bikes over the years. Great forks for the long open road, I only retired them when salty corrosion under the clear coat, and minor creaking became aparent at the dropouts. Unfortunately with my last one, I ordered a cross disk fork with road geometry, for a performance commuter... and apparently got a road fork with a disk tab bonded to it. Needless to say, it failed catastrophicly within 6 months. Im not bashing the forks (Ive bent a Salsa, Surly and the stock fork on the same bike) just saying make sure the fork is designed for your intended purpose. The guys at Wound up were great, refunding my purchace price and advising me to find a fork that would be more suited to my riding style.

OVERALL
RATING
3
VALUE
RATING
3
jefseven   Recreational Rider [Jan 17, 2011]
Strength:

Beautiful, straight, tracks straight, strong. If you're worried about 5 or 10 (or even 20) grams, you might have bigger problems.

Weakness:

causes a lot of jealousy in other riders

I bought this one to replace one that was in a head-on collision causing catastrophic failure of a Mavic Ksyrium SSL front wheel. The person responsible for the accident paid for everything, so instead of "chancing" the older fork, I bought a new one. There were almost negligible signs of stress around the crown, but the impact was enough to split a VERY EXPENSIVE wheel right in two! I was a lot the worse for wear, bruised sternum, torn shoulder muscles, etc., but honestly, I think had I not been reimbursed for the fork, I might have considered continuing riding the old one. I made my own stress tests on it and it bore a LOAD of weight (much more than my own) - without the least signs of weakness anywhere. It has a 1" carbon steerer and I weight about 180#. This one compares favorably to my Colnago fork, although I'll give the Colnago the edge for now. I'm probably making my preference on the rake, which was more "relaxed" with the first W-U, but the new one is a little more aggressive. The Colnago was exactly between the two. I don't have enough miles on it to make a solid determination yet - It usually takes at least 2K miles for me to form any kind of educated opinion. If it has a catastrophic failure, like the one "AINTNOSUCKA" describes, I'll be VERY SURPRISED! I note that he's not a registered reviewer (how hard is THAT to do?) and after what he calls "catastrophic failure" he seems non the less for the wear - he simply did some checking at the LBS's after that! WOW! After riding straight forks, I'll never go back to a curve, either. Not if I can help it! It's beautiful and strong and tracks like a mind-reader - Ok, call me a pollyanna, I'll take it!

Similar Products Used: Kinesis Al
Colnago Flash
OVERALL
RATING
5
VALUE
RATING
5
rhanbury   Commuter [Jun 26, 2008]
Strength:

* will custom make to your requirements
* strong
* stable

Weakness:

* stiff ride
* looks that you love or hate
* quality-control/customer service

The best thing about these forks was they were one of very few available (custom made in my case) suitable for mudguards/fenders and long drop brakes on my audax/randonee bike, both in the length and in the fittings.

On the upside they are strong and stable, but the ride is too stiff for me - I'm a lightweight (150 lbs) and ride on a lot of broken up the tarmac. Also I wasn't terribly impressed by the quality control or customer service - one of the mudguard mountings was inserted into the steerer leg at the wrong angle. Customer service gave me the wrong dimensions for the crown to steerer distance, and forgot to include the star fangled nut to fit the headset.

Similar Products Used: Steel touring forks
OVERALL
RATING
3
VALUE
RATING
3
Walhog King   Recreational Rider [Jun 06, 2008]
Strength:

Light weight, nice looking fork and the price I paid leaves no room to complain.

Weakness:

Light weight? I weight 230lbs and makes me thinks a bit before I bunny hop the bike.

The fork was stickered with Seven Cycles brand. I assumed it was stock to a Seven cycles road bike. I weighted on my food scale on home and came in less than a pound. It was a carbon steer with alumiun insert.
This fork takes the road vibration out of the bike. I had to check the tire pressure to make sure that it was not deflated. I can see the fork flex under load. It is definetely more flexible than the last carbon fork I had installed.

Similar Products Used: Nashbar carbon fork
OVERALL
RATING
4
VALUE
RATING
5
funkdaddy   Road Racer [May 19, 2005]
Strength:

Very strong, predictable, reliable, no problems or degradation in 3 full seasons of heavy usage in cyclocross races and training.

Weakness:

A bit heavy for carbon, limited mud and brake clearance (newer version has a new crown with more clearance)

Actually used (and raced) the '02 Wound-Up CX fork w/ Chromoly steerer. Tough fork, solid performer.

Similar Products Used: AlphaQ CX fork, Kinesis Aluminum, Steel
OVERALL
RATING
4
VALUE
RATING
4
bike_boy   Commuter [Mar 12, 2005]
Strength:

Gorgeous, light, good vibration dampening, and comes in a tandem model. Made in cooperation w/ Co-Motion, so the geometry is not changed.

Weakness:

Kinda pricey, but it is carbon.

It's not the only carbon tandem-fork available, but it is one of the most beuatiful bike components ever made. We've been using it for nearly the past year and the bike still feels like a dream. And certainly the fork has a lot to do w/ this. As the captain, I can say that it goes where it is pointed and does an excellant job of dampening road vibration.

Similar Products Used: None on the tandem. Otherwise, old school OCLV w/ steel steerer tube.
OVERALL
RATING
5
VALUE
RATING
4
posthocfallacy   Recreational Rider [Mar 11, 2004]
Strength:

Well built, light, pretty to look at. Good conversation pieces.

Weakness:

Information about steer tube recommendations are not available without a phone call. It should be on the web.

I bought my '98 LS Appalachian used. The stock aluminum forks were harsh. I use this bike for 2 to 8 day touring trips, loaded with rear panniers and handle bar bag (no front panniers yet) or BOB Yak. I do the bike part of 3 triathlons each year, and ride 4 to 10 centurys a year. This is my general purpose road bike. I have about 4000 miles on the forks. I bought the cross forks because I wanted heavy duty. My bike requires 1" threadless steer tube. I really like the feel of these forks and have never had any shimmy or shake, even with high speed decents (max speed 51 mph on Old Stage Road north of Boulder) with corners at the bottom which require hard braking, which I never seem to get done before the corner, so am braking as I go into the corner. I have heard this is the worst condition for shimmy. I have never gone that fast loaded, but have had some 30 mph corners loaded that all felt solid. I feel more flex and motion from the Ti frame than I do from the forks. The Ti frame flex is especially noticable loaded, and doesn't seem to make a difference whether panniers or Yak. My only complaint about Wound Up is that for anyone over 200 lb (I am 215, was 230) they do not recommend the aluminum and certainly don't recommend the carbon steer tube. As far as I can tell, there is no mention of that on their website. If the owner of my LBS (Performance) hadn't called Wound UP, I would have ordered the aluminum steer tube. Who knows how bad a mistake that would have been? It is possible that they over-build their product enough that nothing would have happened, especially since I don't do cyclocross and am not abusing the forks as I would if I did. Other than that, the product is great. I think it took about a week to get the forks, because the cross forks are built when the order comes in, not sitting on a shelf ready to ship. They look good, get comments from other bikers and start some great conversations. I have crashed once with these forks on the bike. The wheel was tacoed so badly that it wouldn't roll. I was able to smack the wheel on the ground hard enough be able to ride it home with the brakes released. The forks survived the crash without a scratch. I have more than 1000 mi. on them since (and a new rim) and handling has not changed.

Similar Products Used: None. The only other carbon part I have ever used is my carbon aero bars.
OVERALL
RATING
5
VALUE
RATING
5
Geremy   Road Racer [May 02, 2003]
Strength:

Strong and road comfort. Steel steerer is a must, only a couple of grams more, but well worth it in terms of comfort and lifespan.

Weakness:

None so far

Purchased a Wound Up fork with steel steerer about 2 years ago. I have a few thousand miles on it, very comfortable and strong. I am writing this review to clarify how stong this fork is. I was door jammed at about 20 miles an hour in Atlanta traffic. The fork took the direct hit, then the handle bars, then the head tube. The fork has absolutely no signs of damage, have ridden 1000 miles since. This was a hard hit as it bent my handle bars, broke my shifter cables, and put some serious scracthes in my frame, not to mention myself! The fork is still 100%. The combination of flex and strength of the design is outstanding. Furthermore, the on road comfort is the best I have experienced.

Similar Products Used: Steel fork, many other carbons
OVERALL
RATING
5
VALUE
RATING
5
Leisure   Recreational Rider [Jun 02, 2002]
Strength:

Plush AND Precise. Fork looks modern and retro at the same time.

Weakness:

Bit heavy, bit pricey.

I'm a mountainbiker to begin with who likes full-suspension and technical riding. I've been spoiled by coil/oil Marzocchis and, when purchasing my first serious roadbike, looked around for a fork that would emulate a lot of the virtues of a precise, yet plush mountain fork. I expected to compromise a lot because of seemingly large differences in priorities between road and mountain biking. I figured I'd be constantly irritated by the clunky feel of a fully-rigid front-end that wandered about over minor road blemishes. Some forks were exactly that, others did better than I expected. But the Woundup managed to get the most of the feel I wanted. It tracks and turns in precisely, and ordinary road chatter is damped out completely. I would almost call it plush. It feels really calm and confident, and does so just as well at 45 mph as it does at 10. Obviously I love the feel, and the quasi-retrogrouch look is kind of cool too. If you're reading the review below wondering about longevity, Woundup now has a lifetime warranty, and claims to have twice the fatigue resistance of the next-strongest carbon fork. Whether or not it's really that high would be interesting to see, but I'm interpretting that to mean that if there was any issue with the fork to begin with it has been resolved.

OVERALL
RATING
5
VALUE
RATING
4
Boxes   Recreational Rider [Jan 25, 2002]
Strength:

Stiff and responsive

Weakness:

You may or may not like it''s looks.

This is the only carbon fork I have realy ridden. I have not notice any characteristics that I do not like.

Similar Products Used: Look - short ride on too small a frame
OVERALL
RATING
4
VALUE
RATING
5
Showing 1-10 of 18