TST Titanium Road Frame Frames

TST Titanium Road Frame Frames 

DESCRIPTION

Ovalized and Curved Chainstays. Tapered and Curved Seat Stays. Bi-ovalized Downtube. Brushed Satin Finish. Downtube Mounted Shifter Mounts. Ti-6-4 Machined Dropouts. 3.2lb.

USER REVIEWS

Showing 1-7 of 7  
[Jun 04, 2008]
pseudo world
Recreational Rider

Strength:

The ride reminded me of a steel rd bike I had many years ago when I was bike messenger. It is plush yet not flexi, and handles rough roads well. Used to race crits an a Cannondale, which was stiff but harsh. After a few rides, noticed the less punishing ride of ti.

Weakness:

Not as stiff as alum, but a worthy trade off for a longer lasting bike.

I brought the frame to replace an aging alum/carb frame. After riding and racing on a ti mt bike for 7yrs, and still using the bike to commute(99 Airborne), decided to try a ti rd bike. The price was unbelievable, and after some research, decided to purchase it. Build quality is first rate.

Similar Products Used:

Specialized Allez, Cannondale, Scattante

OVERALL
RATING
5
VALUE
RATING
4
[Apr 04, 2007]
Mr Roo
Recreational Rider

Strength:

Outstanding performance, durability and comfort. It looks like a $5K bike without the splashy paint-job and advertising.

Weakness:

The rear drop-out requires you to remove the skewer to take off the back wheel (also a good safety factor!)

The frame came at exactly 3.2 lbs out of the box (54cm). There were many options available, and for durability, ride comfort and style (plain without graphic) the TST was the best value money can buy. The frame size was a little large for me, however the small adjustments have made it fit like a glove. The ride is exceptional, and for a frame that doesn't scratch/dent or break, I am totally convinced Ti is the way to go. It climbs extremely well - with a little flex in the BB. Downhill it goes like a rocket ship. Over long rides (Centuries etc) soaks up the road well. I used a full carbon fork (Reynolds Ouzo), and carbon seatpost. I have switched out the bike out for Triathlon as well and completed Ironman. It did very well on the course as a roadbike/come Tri bike. My latest investment to the bike was a set of Carbon Pro-lite Gavia wheels. Its a serious machine now!

OVERALL
RATING
5
VALUE
RATING
5
[Jun 27, 2006]
wheeltitan
Recreational Rider

Strength:

price, quality, durability.

Weakness:

1" headtube a little tougher to find parts for. Down tube mounted shifters but this can be adapted.

This review if for the circa 2005 frame with bi-ovalized down tube, curved seat stays and 1" headset. I enjoy riding hard and fast and was looking for a lively, efficient, durable frame. Titanium seemed like the right material and I am glad I found this frame. As others have said the welds and precision of the frame appear to be of high quality. Perfect really. Someone must have had a very steady hand. It's not quite as lively as my steel Basso, but it's close. The difference is that when I jump on the pedals, the bike seems to enjoy it as much as I do and it takes off. Because of this I find I often like to chase cars on flats or pound over small hills without losing momentum and I usually feel like I want more after the end of a ride. Sometimes, however, for more moderate sustained efforts I don't feel as if it's as efficient but this might very well be me. As for stability on descents, it is very sure, but I suspect this has more to do with headtube angle, fork rake, and rider technique. I can't say how this frame compares to other titanium frames, but given it's beafy downtube and chainstays I suspect it is stiffer than those with more standard size tubing in these areas. I love the simplicity of a frame which rides great, is fatigue resistant, and isn't not littered with logos and paint to peel or chip and ultimately it makes me want to ride all the time.

Similar Products Used:

old steel Basso with Campy Chorus

OVERALL
RATING
5
VALUE
RATING
5
[Feb 07, 2006]
WheresWaldo
Recreational Rider

Strength:

Titanium Built by TST in Kent, WA Standard geometry Good looks No need for frame prep

Weakness:

Limited fork choices by 1" head tube Had to perform some surgery on head tube

Just completed building this frame into a full Ultegra Triple. All I can say is that this is one of the most comfortable bikes I have ever ridden. The welds are superb and the finsish of the frame is good. Everything is straight and there is little need for frame preperation to build this into a really nice bike. There is one caveat. The frame ws designed for a fork that has 362mm blade length. so most of todays forks will raise the front end 3mm. It was also designed for a lower headset stacked height of 11.5mm, this may or may not be a problem, for example a Chris King NoThreadSet has a lower stack height of 12.9mm. I fixed mine by removing 4mm from the bottom of the head tube. Everything worked out perfect. In the past I had ridden some early Merlin Titanium bikes and felt like they were mushy, very flexible in the bottom bracket area. The TST is certainly stiffer in that area. But with a good carbon fork and the titanium frame it is a very compliant ride. Geometry is traditional, with a parallel top tube and very conservative angles. It responds well to steering input without being twitchy. It is very stable rolling at high speeds. My current bike is a Klein Quantum Elite Dura-Ace from 1989. It has served me well but is very stiff and uncomfortable on really long rides. Titanium is certainly a much more comfortable ride and I was able to get the fit I needed with proper selection of parts.

Similar Products Used:

Merlin Titanium Klein Quantum Elite

OVERALL
RATING
4
VALUE
RATING
5
[Oct 31, 2005]
c722061
Recreational Rider

Strength:

Titanium smoothness. Lighter than most steel frames and cheap aluminums. Affordable compares with other boutique Titanium frames.

Weakness:

Sans graphics. A little porky.

I own several bikes with different frame materials. From experiences with good Trek steel frame to Specialized S-Works to Cannondale CAAD7 frames, I say this frame is very comfortable and fast. I decked it out with 105 double group, Chris King headset and Profile Design carbon fork, the bike weights in at 18 1/2 lbs with pedal so it is not that heavy. I use this bike for all sort of rides and I would say it is comfortable for century rides. I ride a lot on not well-paved roads and this bike just mutes out all high frequency vibrations. It also tracks so well with Profile Design fork (43 rake)that I could take corner real fast. I'll say it is better handling than my Specialize S-Works. So if you want try out Titanium with out breaking your bank than I recommend it.

Similar Products Used:

Cannondale CAAD7 frame Specialized S-Works Trek 600 Schwinn supersport.

OVERALL
RATING
4
VALUE
RATING
5
[Jan 12, 2005]
crestlinefarm
Road Racer

Strength:

Titanium is the perfect frame material for aggressive...or dare I say "husky" riders. At 5'11" 220lbs and a sprinter's build, I can put a lot of power into this frame and it eats it up. From the first pedal stroke, the acceleration was explosive--no flex whatsoever in the bottom bracket or rear triangle. Perfect for sprints, yet long rides on chipsealed roads did not produce the "buzz" I felt in my previous Aluminum rigs. Who knows, maybe by the end of this year, this frame will help me into the sub-200 category for the first time in 20 years!

Weakness:

Once you go Ti you won't go back!

If you are considering a Titanium frame and can find one of these, buy it--you will not be disappointed. As nice as any Litespeed or Merlin at a fraction of the cost (how much do you really want to pay for a name?) Last fall I was involved in a crash that bent my aluminum race frame into a pretzel. In shopping for a replacement, I considered a ton of frames within my meager budget; aluminum, aluminum/carbon mix, low-end carbon, even steel. I'd narrowed the choice to a Cinelli, Quattro Assi, or Litespeed Hyperion (not Ti, but aluminum/carbon mix). I asked a friend for advice on the three candidates and he blew my plan out of the water. "Might I suggest a titanium frame?" Turns out he lives close to Titanium Sports Technology (TST) in Kennewick, Washington. He also happens to know an engineer there and has ridden and raced their road and mountain frames. He vouched for the fit, finish, & QA and promised me I couldn't find better welds--called them "jewel like". His assurances were correct. The first frame I received was a traditional geometry 58cm, which turned out to be about a half-size too big (57.5 top tube, 56.5 seat tube c-t-c). This frame has a shaped down tube (bi-ovalized), curved and shaped seat & chain stays (sexy!) and plasma machined Ti 6/4 dropouts. Luckily I was able to get exactly the same frame in a 56cm...and believe me I had no problem finding one of my taller friends who was willing to "take the 58cm off my hands!"

Similar Products Used:

Similar is a relative term--I've ridden various Aluminum & steel rigs; Peugeot, Raleigh Technium (danger~bonded aluminum tubes BAD), old steel Trek, new aluminum Trek, K2 Mod.4, & Giant OCR.

OVERALL
RATING
5
VALUE
RATING
5
[Jun 29, 2004]
ZenNMotion
Road Racer

Strength:

very comfortable for high mileage days Predictable neutral handling Stiff enough for sprints but not harsh All the bennies of Titanium Very inexpensive, while the old stock lasts!

Weakness:

Plain jane stealth bike- no decals, paint, markings-uwanna rolling billboard, get a Colnago or a Litespeed. Not a bike for a criterium specialist- but perfectly adequate. You can't have it all at any price! You'll get tired of explaining "what kinda bike is that?" From a know-it-all roadie "that looks like a Seven" Well it ain't. Bush has a Trek, Kerry a Serotta; if Nader shaved his legs and increased his LT threshold, this would be the bike he'd choose. Well, buy it anyway. rated 4 for plain looks, though the welds are better than Litespeed's

I'm a cat 3 Masters racer in my 18th year of racing. I've actually had 2 of these frames, the first met its end in an accident- a '95 model with straight stays. My current one is a 2000 model, 3/2 Ti with curved stays and a beefed up shaped downtube. These are excellent frames, and old stock are being sold through the deep discounters (Cambria, Nashbar, Ive even seen them on Ebay). My 56c/t weighs 3lbs 3oz on my postal scale. I also purchased a 55cm Litespeed Tuscany frame, compared the 2 and sold the Tuscany. Welds appear at least as good as Litespeed, if not better. The brushed finish looks nice, but not as well done as LS. The 1" traditional headtube is either a plus (my opinion- home serviceable headset without fuss)or "outdated" when compared to 1 1/8 integrated crap that LS has marketed (I've never heard a satisfactory answer to why). The headtube is 14cm, plenty long enough for enough stiffness for my all carbon Look hsc3 fork. The bike handles beautifully and predictably, more a road racer/fast century rider (no hands is easy) than twitchy crit bike, though I've raced in plenty of fast crits. It's hard to tell handling characteristics of different frames unless you push the limits- this one shows its stuff on fast switchback descents, takes decreasing radius turns like its on a monorail, predictable, easy to change lines or pull out during hard braking . Like I said, its not as super responsive as some in tight packs in crits, but much better as an all-rounder and super comfy for long days and rough roads. At 5'10" and 150 lbs, I'm not a sprint specialist, but this is plenty stiff in the sprints for me, no noticeable flex. This frame feels nearly the same as a Litespeed Ultimate I rode a few times, maybe a bit more forgiving for the long days. The frame was absolutely in perfect alignment I checked it myself- (ex-mechanic) and required no further prep. I got this directly from the factory, and dealt directly with TST's CEO (!), so I don't know about the Nashbar and Cambria frames, they may need prep. If youre reading this, you probably already know that its made with 3/2 Sanvik Ti tubing, built by some of the most experienced Ti welders in the U.S, not some sweatshop overseas. Don't worry about the 1inch headtube. You will find replacement forks and headsets for many years to come. I also like the Look fork. They have a reputation of being somewhat more flexy, but my experience has been excellent- the HSC-3 is a very nice match for this frame, for road racing, crits and long training rides in the hills. An materials scientist/roadie friend who's been an expert witness in several fork failure lawsuits recommended Look for its construction, testing and excellent safety. That was good enough for me. Plus, an amazing deal at totalcycling in the UK. If you want flash get flash and do your part to spend the economy back to health. If you want a bombproof, beautiful handling racing/century titanium frame that will last forever at a great price, consider the TST and put your own decals on (or not). Just don't tell anyone you got it at Nashbar!

Similar Products Used:

Trek 2000 alum, various high end steel, Litespeed Ultimate

OVERALL
RATING
4
VALUE
RATING
5
Showing 1-7 of 7  

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