Litespeed Siena Ultegra Road Bike

Siena Ultegra

Frame Material: 3Al/2.5V titanium/carbon fiber composite
Frame Angles: 73.5 head, 73.0 seat
Sizes: 51cm, 53cm, 55cm, 57cm, 59cm
Colors: Brushed
Fork: LSP Carbon
Rear Shock: Not applicable
Brake Levers: Shimano Ultegra STI Dual Control
Handlebar: ITM Mantjs Super Over
Stem: ITM
Headset: 1 1/8" threadless Cane Creek
Front Der: Shimano Ultegra, bottom-pull/clamp-on 31.8mm
Crankset: Shimano Ultegra, 39/53 teeth
Rear Der: Shimano Ultegra SS
Pedals: Not applicable
Tires: 700 x 23c Vittoria Rubino Pro

User Reviews (12)

Showing 1-10 of 12  
Chip   Recreational Rider [Jul 05, 2011]
Strength:

Beautiful fit and finish..truly a USA made thing of beauty. The bends and the welds couldn't be any better.

Weakness:

I'm not sure about the quality of the decals they use,seem to scracth and flake very easily.

Purchased the frameset on ebay..wanted to go TI. The ride is very smooth..although not as "soft" as carbon fiber. Stand on the pedals and this bike takes off like a rocket ship..much quicker then my Look 566. Handling is very quick, but neutral..confidence inspiring on fast downhills and sweepers..find myself going much faster downhills.

Similar Products Used: Look 566, ultegra, spinergy xaero wheels, Michelin pro 3 tires, fsa cockpit.
OVERALL
RATING
4
VALUE
RATING
4
h2one   Road Racer [Nov 01, 2010]
Strength:

Very little road chatter, pretty to look at (I have the red decals option), ti inherently has awesome qualities to it like longevity. Great handling due to compact frame.

Weakness:

It's a little heavy and pricey for what you get - there are carbon options that perform better. But hey - you get ti because you already looked at carbon options

I bought the 2009 Siena - I believe this is the most recent Siena as litespeed did not come out with another one for their '10 and '11 lineup. I bought the bike without wheels, and swapped out the parts with DA parts from another bike and added my reynolds attack wheels.

This bike has a very nice muted ride quality to it. The handling is racy, but does not communicate the road very well. This could be a good thing if you're doing recreational riding, but for racing, stick with carbon. The ride is stiff but not punishing, and the supplied litespeed fork is plenty stiff.

Similar Products Used: Giant TCR adv 2008
Orbea Orca
Klein Q-pro
OVERALL
RATING
4
VALUE
RATING
3
rockcrusher   Commuter [Jun 12, 2008]
Strength:

Light and attractive with curved seatstays made of TI. Solid handling and stiffness, not too twitchy not too relaxed. The perfect commuting bike.

Weakness:

Hard to keep clean looking. Fork (litespeed house brand) is a touch flexy under lateral loading.

I transitioned to this bike from a bianchi CX bike. This bike is 100% better at everything (except perhaps CX) than my other bike. The ride is uber-compliant yet it is stiff and resilient. It turns in with authority yet holds and changes lines with ease. I find myself turning in too tight sometimes just by moving my head. Component wise the Ultegra is solid and the rest of the spec is basic. The litespeed saddle did not work for me at all though.

Similar Products Used: none
OVERALL
RATING
4
VALUE
RATING
3
Bigtea   Recreational Rider [May 26, 2008]
Strength:

Ride, appearance, indestructablity, head-turning looks, low low maintenance.

Weakness:

Ride, appearance, indestructablity, head-turning looks, low low maintenance.

The Siena was re-engineered in 2006. Reviews of the 2005 and earlier models are not comparable.

Litespeed offers five high-end road bikes, and the Sienna sits one notch above entry level. The frame is titanium, butted, shaped, and handmade in Tennessee. Because of the labor-intensive workmanship, Litespeed bikes are expensive when compared to similar weighted, foreign-fabricated, carbon fiber frames. But the trade off isn't just weight or money. There is more to consider.

The Siena is an amazing bike, for both its ride quality and aesthetics. Stand on the pedals and you will be instantly rewarded with forward motion. This is a very quick bike without any of the harshness you would expect to find with such responsiveness. Think of a BMW or a Lexus. The ride is ti-smooth, and the handling is very predictable and stable. On downhills and corners it tracks with laser beam precision. The Siena's handmade-in-the-USA fabrication approaches metal sculpture, with cake-decorator welds and oh-so-exotic tube shapes. With the exception of the head tube, there is nothing on this frame that is straight and ordinary. That said, a Siena is not for the weight-obsessed, although with Dura-Ace and a lot of carbon componets it could be built up to a little over 16 pounds. Larger riders (I'm six feet, 220 pounds) will find it especially attractive because of its strong, solid construction. It will not noodle under your weight at all. If you want an unique combination of durability, comfort, beauty, strength, and ride, the Siena is worth a very serious look.

Similar Products Used: Litespeed Firenze, various Italian steel bikes over the years
OVERALL
RATING
5
VALUE
RATING
5
scollins44   Road Racer [Nov 25, 2007]
Strength:

Stiff
Durability
Ride Quality

Weakness:

Real Design Super Sphere hubs that come with the stock wheels are kinda weak.....easy enough to fix. Other then that.....None!

I've been riding/abusing this 2006 Sienna for about a year now. I've got nothing but good things to say about this bike. Looks sharp, shaped seat stays smooth out the road, full titanium compact frame design gives instant response when you stomp down on it. I'm fairly new to road racing so I do mostly CAT 4/5 races. I must say this bike exceeds all my needs. Very responsive in the sprints, VERY stable at higher speeds (40+MPH), and was probably a Timex watch in it's former life because of it's ability to take punishment (hard riding and those unfortunate crashes).
I'm a firefighter, which means "everything is junk and will break until proven otherwise". Not so with the Sienna.
This bike is a great investment for someone who can't drop $2500-$4000 every other year on a new ride. I see a ton of older Litespeeds and other titanium bikes still on the road years after they were purchased.

Similar Products Used: Fuji Robaix
OVERALL
RATING
5
VALUE
RATING
5
Patrick McDonnell   Recreational Rider [Sep 11, 2007]
Strength:

Rock solid construction and welds. Can be fitted to a wide variety of riders, including hard to fit cyclists. Nice compromise between a near race ready bike and a bike suitable for a comfortable century. It is also a nice compromise between stiffness and comfort, particularly if you are older 40. The bike will always look as new as when you bought it. Buy if you care about quality construction and want to keep a bike for many years.

Weakness:

Don't buy if you are a young cyclist looking for a super light responsive racer. There are certainly bikes that offer a better value.

The fit and finish on this bicycle are excellent. The compact geometry allows for greated options in terms of fit; and this is the first bike that really works for my short inseam and long torso. With traditional geometry, I would usually have to sacrifice on living with a too short top tube, or a too tall seat tube. The sloping top tube allows me to get a perfect fit. My bike has an FSA compact crankset and an upgraded stem and seatpost (Thompson)which looks and works great on this bike. The bike has excellent ride quality compared to the large guage aluminum tubing I historically rode. For my purposes, riding fast recreationally on group rides, it has been excellent. It seems to climb well and is very responsive. I stay comfortable evan after a long day i the saddle but it still is pretty light (<17#). The bike is very stable on descents. Ti construction means it is virtually indestructible.

Similar Products Used: Cannondales
OVERALL
RATING
5
VALUE
RATING
4
nightrider   Recreational Rider [Mar 09, 2007]
Strength:

GREAT looks, indestructible frame, Litespeed brand recognition, good components. It's an heirloom quality bike - you could will it to your children for them to ride for lifetimes...

Weakness:

Heavy(ish), lateral flex in BB area, not sure Ti is the best material for bicycle frames. Better bikes out there for much less money.

I picked this bike up from a friend who had quit riding just after he bought it. I got it with less than 200 miles on it. It seemed like too good of a deal to pass up. I was intrigued by the Ti ride qualities complimented by the carbon forks and the swoopy carbon seat stays. It seemed to me like the bicycle that Batman would ride if he had to.

I quickly swapped the crank to my FSA SLK, swapped the wheels with my Ksyrium SSC SLs, Conti Attack/Force tires, a Reynolds Carbon Pro seat post, Selle Italia SLR, and a Dura Ace rear derailleur, and some FSA K-wing bars. I figured that was a pretty good base setup. Even with that, it was still a bit burly at about 17.5lbs w/ cages and pedals.

I got this bike to replace my EPX 303, which is a pretty mass market carbon frame, of the old world design (small diameter thick tubes, big joints). I thought the EPX was flexy.

The Sienna initially seemed a little stiffer, and more agile than the EPX. It seemed to take the edge off of little bumps nicely, but with a big hit, it was kind of jarring. The handling was a little twitchy, though at high speeds it felt pretty stable, and could carve a line on a fast descent almost telepathically (probably saved my butt one time when a rider ahead of me stopped in the middle of the road from a flat during a very fast descent). I'd stay it really shines at speeds over about 20mph.

The fit and finish of this bike is amazing. It is a truly beautiful bike to look at. All of the exotic shaped tubes, flawless welds, and the carbon seat stays make it a real head-turner. People seemed to be quite impressed by it.

It's demise came when I stripped it down and put it on the scale, and compared it to my EPX. I came up with almost a 1.5 lb difference in the weight, so I built the EPX back up with all the goodies and took it for a ride. I was blown away by how much stiffer it was for climbing, and how much more direct the power transfer was - as well as it being a little more plush feeling ride (without being dead). I pretty much immediately decided to sell the Sienna after that.

I put about 4000 miles on this bike, so it's not miserable, but I sold it without any regret whatsoever.

Ultimately, I feel that it's a beautiful design, but have moved into the anti-ti camp. They are indestructible, but I think the design of this bike is a off. The down tube, being oval, makes for hard hits on bumps, but doesn't provide lateral support - so the bike hits hard on bumps, but flexes laterally when you crank on it. It's not a sprinter bike, nor a very good climber. I'd say that it would make a terrific recreational bike - as it is pretty comfy, and rolls pretty smoothly in the flats/rollers.

I'll give it four stars for value, because three seems too low. I'd go 3.5 if it were an option. There are a lot of better riding bikes out there for less money.

As far as the Overall, I'm going to give it a 4 again. The quality of construction is amazing. I do feel like the geometry, ride quality are good, but the flexiness and it's kind of dead climbing manners detract from giving it anything higher. There are better handling bikes out there for much less. I'd say shop around if you're going to drop big coin like this - Felt, Scott, Specialized, Trek, and many other companies make better riding bikes for less.

Similar Products Used: Trek 5200, Trek 1000, EPX 303, Scott CR1, Specialized Roubaix, Felt F1c, TVT.
OVERALL
RATING
4
VALUE
RATING
4
benbutler   Road Racer [Jan 30, 2007]
Strength:

Stiff, comfortable, responsive, made in the USA. Titanium is forever (or until you get bored and want something new).

Weakness:

Pricy, but built to last forever.

I'm just getting back into cycling after 15+ years off and was looking for the comfort of steel but the weight of carbon. Titanium falls between. Litespeed scores points in all categories. Obviously, I could have spent more money on a light, custom steel frame, but the Siena was within my price range. I believe it falls somewhere between steel and carbon in the weight department, but is VERY stiff and VERY comfortable. If weight were a real issue, I'd eat less. There are a great deal hills, both long and short, in western North Carolina and the Siena is rigid and efficient when climbing. It also has a very definite advantage in the downhill over ALL of the carbon/aluminum frames I tried (Trek Madone, Giant OCR1, OCR3, Cannondale Six 13). It is steady, holds its line well and inspires great confidence. I have reached speeds up to 58 mph on Howard's Gap. If you get a chance, take a look at the 06 Siena up close. Notice the thought that has gone into the design particularly of the stays and the down tube. Somebody LOVED making this bike. It's beautifully thought out.

Similar Products Used: See above
OVERALL
RATING
5
VALUE
RATING
5
Bob Reid   Recreational Rider [Aug 31, 2006]
Strength:

Good stiffness without losing comfort. Fast bike.

Weakness:

This year model has the Ultegra 9 speed drive train - the 10 speed is a significant upgrade.

This was my first ti bike and it rides very well. Great comfort and respectable stiffness. The bike accelerates smoothly and is capable of fast riding. Engineering and manufacturing appear to be excellent.

Similar Products Used: Cannondale, Litespeed Ghisallo
OVERALL
RATING
5
VALUE
RATING
5
peter10512   Recreational Rider [Jul 27, 2006]
Strength:

Looks, comfort, craftsmanship and durability.

Weakness:

Wheels, feels a little spongy.

Basically a very nice bike, but you better make sure it is what you are looking for before you buy. I made the mistake of just going by a friends advice and now I'm paying the price. I've gone through the setup several times (with a dealer), tried different seats and lots of minor adjustments to finally arrive at a feel I can live with.
I'm 6 ft. 0 and weigh 210 lbs. My inseam is 32 and I'm using a 57 cm. frame.
The Siena is a very nice looking bike and the craftsmanship is as good as it gets. The people who complain about the integrated headset and creaking, just need a mechanic who can properly tighten a bearing. No problem and look how many other companies use integrated headsets.
After spending about 2 month with it, I have to say I would not buy this bike again. The Ti frame just feels too cushy to me and I feel like it takes an extra 10% of energy over my Specialized Allez to get the same job done. However, it is more comfortable for very long rides, so I guess it depends what you are looking for.
If you are looking for an efficient, stiff sprinter/climber, this is not your ride.
The Real Design UltraSphere wheels that came with the bike are too lightweight for a person my weight. They creak and twist when you stomp on the pedals.
Replacing them with a set of Shimano DuraAce 7800 made a huge difference for me. Upgrading the wheels got rid of a slight wobble on fast downhills and made the bike feel stiffer. However, if I paid full retail for this bike, I would be mad about the wheels.
Did I say I love the way it looks?

I closing, as a relativ newcomer to the sport I have to emphasize again for anyone considering any bike. Try it first and make sure it is what you want, even if it takes several test rides.
If you're looking for a ride that gets compliments from your friends and is comfortable for short and long rides, your boat has come in.
If you're looking for a race horse that's chomping at the bit, try something else.

Similar Products Used: 2005 Specialized Allez Pro
OVERALL
RATING
4
VALUE
RATING
4
Showing 1-10 of 12  

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