Lynskey Performance Designs Houseblend R330 Road Bike

Lynskey Performance Designs Houseblend R330 Road Bike 

DESCRIPTION

  • Wright style drop-outs with replaceable aluminum hangar
  • Oversize chainstays increase lateral rigidity
  • Semi-compact geometry offers comfortable fit
  • 34.9mm clamp-on front dérailleur
  • 31.6mm seatpost

USER REVIEWS

Showing 1-10 of 11  
[Oct 20, 2012]
dave at FT Campbell

Strength:

comfort, stiffness and durability

Weakness:

None that I can find

I bought my R330 in October 2009 and since then have ridden 17,041 miles to date. The bicycle continues to perform flawlessly and I am enjoying it as much today as I did the day I took it out of the box. I love the helix seat stays and people comment on the appearance of the frame all the time.
It's comfortable, stiff, climbs well but is all-day comfortable. I've been doing 100+ mile weekends all summer with shorter afterwork spins during the week. I don't race, but definately like to push the pace.
To say that I am happy with the bike and with Lynskey the company is a huge understatement. A picture of the bike hangs in my office and I brag about it all the time.
I can't wait to put the next 17,000 miles on it. In fact I am totally comfortable that this is probably the last bicycle frame that I will ever purchase. And, I hope to continue to ride for the next 20 years. I wonder if I can get 100,000 miles on my R330?????

OVERALL
RATING
5
VALUE
RATING
5
[Sep 03, 2012]
Kevin Joy
Recreational Rider

Strength:

Beautiful to look at! Beautifully made - by artisans in titanium bike manufacture. Stiff but very comfortable - buttery smooth over the rough stuff. Incredibly stable when the corners get rough. Amazingly co-operative, helpful company - superb to deal with.

Weakness:

Quality is never cheap...

Ok, first off I need to say I am not a pro, or a racer, just a guy that likes to ride bicycles. I also need to say that I have NEVER owned or ridden a bike this good. I have three bikes, a MTB (also a Lynskey) a single speed commuter and this one. Ever since building this frame up I have not wanted to ride anything else. I keep looking for excuses to leave work earlier so I can extend my ride home. My MTB friends miss me...
I purchased the bike as a deal with full Shimano 105 gear and Shimano 501 wheels and Easton EC70 carbon fork. When the bike arrived I needed to build it up (my choice) and decided to move over my lovely Dura- Ace 7800 gear (including wheels) which was currently on my Trek 1500 aluminium roadie. The bike comes in around 7.8 kg (not that I care too much about weight!).
What I love about this bike is the 'quietness'. It's hard to describe but the frame just seems to absorb road noise that would 'echo' in the alloy frame. Hard square edges on the bitumen are soaked up without that harsh kick in the backside I was used to with my alloy frame. It also feels indestructible. As already mentioned in other reviews it responds well when accelerating and it just loves to climb. Ok, on long rides of a few hours I still feel tired but certainly not beaten up or aching from the bumps. Of course a bike like this will never be as light as the latest carbon fibre wonders but weight isn't everything is it?
Now though, I have a dilemma. I normally replace my bikes around every four to five years. Not because they are worn out but mostly because I like to try different brands/materials etc. I replace the bikes because I don't have room to keep them. This bike is a keeper. I may just have purchased my last road bike...

OVERALL
RATING
5
VALUE
RATING
5
[Jun 13, 2012]
Reed Olmstead
Road Racer

Strength:

Durable, beautiful, will last a lifetime, respectable weight

Weakness:

Wait time to get it (but hey, it's a small shop, so what do you expect?)

First, a bit about me. I've been racing for ~10 years, and have been a recreational ride for over 20 (off and on). My first "real" bike was a steel Bianchi Volpe back when I was in grade school. In '93, I got a specialized Epic Comp with Shimano 600 STI (first year available). I rode that for 10 years or so, then got a steel Tommasini, a Trek 5200, and a steel Bianchi Pista. Then when by Tommasini broke, I got a Douglas Ti frame (CO cyclist house brand). It was stolen back in November of 2011, and I went with Lynskey for my replacement.

I looked at a lot of frames before deciding on the Lynskey. I'm a cat 3 racer who really only has time for crits. While I'm competitive, I don't usually contest the finish; I mainly focus on primes. Being a bigger guy (6-2 and 185 lbs), I wanted something stiff, but as a crit racer, I was reluctant to get something that would be vulnerable in a crash (like plastic...er...carbon). Weight isn't an issue for me either, as I'm not the most svelte rider in the field. I did look at Cervelo and Specialized a bit, as I like the aero frames. However, I loved the ride of my old ti frame, and I wanted something that would last forever. With the natural finish of Ti, scrapes, crashes, and other causes of cosmetic torture aren't a problem. Not to mention the material will last forever.

I spoke with Jack at Lynskey on the phone a few times to get my size and model correct. I went with the 340, as I like a bit of a smoother ride than a lot of racers. The frame took about 2 months to arrive. I was notified of the ship date and it arrived well packaged and on time. I also ordered an ENVE 2.0 fork, Cane Creek headset, and Lynskey seat post.

I built the frame up with 10 speed Campag (as all quality frames deserve the best components available). Build up was easy, with all threads cleanly tapped and chased. Having built up several bikes, I was keen to notice the small details in the fabrication of the frame. Beautiful welds, no slag, consistent finish. Once built, it looked stunning.

Ride quality is impressive. I used to use my steel Tommasini as my reference point in ride comfort, as it was definitely the most responsive and comfortable bike I'd ridden. However, the Lynskey is tops. The compact geometry has really helped my handling skills, as I'm able to take turns much faster than on any of my traditional frames. The bike is stiff where it needs to be, jumping instantly when power is dosed out. I've done a few 70+ mile rides on it do not feel beat up at all (the old Trek carbon frame was a meat grinder...50 miles was max on that for me). But the Lynskey is a dream.

My first race (crit) was a couple of months ago. I got into a 4 man break within the first 30 seconds of the race and we went the distance, with my Lynskey helping me snag 2 primes. The 120* turn 300 meters before the finish was never a problem for me like it would have been on my old frame, as the 340 does a great job holding a tight turn at speed. Since then, I've continued to build confidence in my racing and handling skills to where I'm no longer at a disadvantage on technical courses.

Many thanks to the guys at Lynskey for all their care and attention to detail during the build. It's a frame I expect to enjoy for many, many years.

Similar Products Used:

Steel Bianchi Volpe
Steel Tommasini Tecno
Carbon Specialized Epic
Ti Douglas Precision Ti
Carbon Trek 5200

OVERALL
RATING
5
VALUE
RATING
5
[Jun 09, 2012]
Doone

Strength:

Extremely comfortable ride, very very stiff, surprisingly strong climber, understated elegance

Weakness:

Not cheap-but built for life;
Smudges a bit easily in Industrial Mill finish -Not sure if I buy this pledge furniture spray business to shine it up

I decided on Titanium after 10 years on a Cannondale Caad 3 custom and 3 years on a Bianchi 928 L'una that cracked. I am not light at 190 lbs, but am relatively fit and consider myself a sprinter-type. I took my first ride on Titanium today. The R330 fits very nicely in between these two frames: very stiff, but way more comfortable than aluminum. May not be as delicate as a high end carbon rig, but one can tell quickly that this is a responsive and bulletproof frame. The joy was really in the comfort and flats. Surprisingly, the R330 also climbed very nicely up a 5-8% grade for over 4kms, so this too was a relief. No wobble coming downhill at 65kmh. The stiffness in the bottom bracket results in power transfer that is hard to describe: you are still pushing a heavier rig-but at least you feel as if you are advancing when going uphill, if that makes sense! I debated as to how to spec this frame and ultimately decided on Ultegra 6700 with a compact crank and an 11-28 cassette. I have Record on my carbon frame, but I'm not sure that you would be much better off with Campy on the R330. It will never be ultra light, and giving up only a few hundred grams on Dura-Ace seemed a no-brainer-and it was. I completed spec with Rolf wheels (about 1600g), Ritchey carbon Streem bar and alloy stem, Kris King headset, Easton EC70 fork and iClic racer pedals. The Lynskey Ti seatpost is a thing of beauty too! I bought the frame directly from the factory, where people are super friendly and care deeply about their product. So don't be afraid to take the Titanium plunge-it's only expensive if you do not use it, and you'll have a rig you can pass on to your kids.

OVERALL
RATING
5
VALUE
RATING
5
[Feb 21, 2011]
Trevor Allen
Recreational Rider

Strength:

Performance, value and the 'it' factor that will have you talking about your bike to other admirers.

Weakness:

None. Unless you like blending in with the crowd....

I have owned steel, carbon and other titanium bikes in the past. Each frame had its particular strengths and weaknesses with respect to weight, stiffness, comfort, etc. So when I wanted a new bike near the end of 2009 I wanted to get the bike that combined the benefits of each material; the best of all worlds, so to speak. I read reviews of scores of frames from at least 20 manufacturers, picked a number of brains in the biz, and trusted my own judgement. Titanium was the way to go. My previous Ti frame was my overall favorite ride, and I was longing to go back to it. So I called Jim O'Brien at the Right Gear and told him I was thinking of getting a Lynskey. He replied that there was a "World of difference" between the Ti I had before and the Lynskey. Man, was he right! This bike is stunning in every way. Every bit as light as high-end carbon bikes (Okay, maybe world class racers might notice the few grams of difference, but 99% of riders won't). This bike, folks is stiff! I am not a small guy (6'1" and 190 lbs.), and there is simply NO flex in this frame. Energy put into pedaling transfers directly to the pavement in the form of forward motion. The R330 is a stable, confidence-inspiring bike - on descents, in turns or in any condition. My frame was shipped with an Alpha Q (GS-10) fork, which has proven to be a very suitable pairing. There is no flex in the fork, even in hard, out-of-the-saddle climbing or sprinting. Since I am a recreational rider, I wanted (most of all) a comfortable bike, one on which I would look forward to completing long rides. This is what makes this bike and this company really shine. Shortly after getting the Lynskey I did a 60+ mile ride and my 40-year old body felt great afterward. This bike is a joy to ride! Comfortable, stiff, light, and stunning good looks! And mine is a 'Houseblend' version. Lynskey offers an entire custom build-up as an option. Its hard to imagine it getting any better...

Similar Products Used:

2000 Lemond Victoire - Ultegra build and Rolf Vector Comp Wheelset

OVERALL
RATING
5
VALUE
RATING
5
[Dec 29, 2010]
ryanharne
Road Racer

Strength:

Extremely smooth welds and generally high build quality.
Stiff and responsive during aggressive acceleration but comfortable enough while you're rumbling over long gravel sections at a race pace.
A good value considering I plan to take the frame to my grave.
Top notch customer service/representatives.

Weakness:

Like another reviewer, I am not terribly happy about the decals but there are many nice ti frame builders who still use them rather than etching (Moots, for example).
I would really prefer a cast or machine headtube badge, though, even before laser etching of the logos. The current badge doesn't look like it will hold up to years of use nearly as well as something that is machined from a small block of titanium.

I purchased a Houseblend R330 frame and Alpha Q GS-10 fork in August 2009. A Cane Creek S3 headset was installed by my favorite LBS and I put on the rest of the components, which were all identical from the previous bike. The Lynskey purchase was intended to eliminate my bike lust. I had become very tired with always wanting the latest carbon that Contador, Boonen, or whoever was riding to their success. I wanted a bike made of metal, made in America, and made to last. My personal build is a climber-type but I also savor bad weather riding and anything on gravel. The bike I wanted needed to be light enough to not get in the way when I (attempt to) attack my buddies on climbs but also needed to be durable enough to take beatings over washboard gravel.

So, those were my requirements. Honestly, I no longer remember what pointed me in the direction of Lynskey. I was considering something in this $2k price range and spent several months doing online research. I expected titanium would be the best metal since I wasn't concerned with lugwork or beautiful paint schemes. Frankly, I had always loved my friend's titanium bikes decked out in nothing but some etching or minor decals. Hand-brushed titanium is just stellar. And somehow I discovered Lynskey.

The previous bike I was coming from was a 2009 Specialized Tarmac SL, at the time one of their top-tier carbon bikes. Since I built the Lynskey using the same components from the Tarmac, I was able to, from one day to the next, determine how well the Lynskey rode in comparison.

The first impression was that I truly was not sacrificing any comfort by going back to a metal bike. Titanium is not aluminum (from my Cannondale CAAD experience) and the Lynskey is just as comfortably responsive as the Tarmac. But it clearly is a bit "firmer" in terms of putting the power down. It hops out of tight corners just like the best of bikes and allows me to step on the pedals on a climb and get instant acceleration.

After 18 months with the Lynskey, my main objective is complete: I no longer have bike lust. Yes, they also make that beautiful Helix frame, but I think I'm quite happy with the R330; the no-nonsense design really appeals to me. This frame will leave my stable only by force.

I've raced all sorts of events, done informal racing centuries, group rides, weekly hammerfests, countless repeats of my favorite local 22% gradient... this bike does everything extremely well and I've never had any suspicion that I'm missing out by having given the cold shoulder to a carbon frame.

On another front, without ridiculous oversized tubing, cleaning the frame down is a piece of cake since a cloth can easily make it around all of the tubes. It genuinely saves time to clean a frame when you aren't trying to weasel a cloth around clunky carbon shapes.

The bike is truly an all-arounder but is probably stiff and race-like enough to turn-off those only interested in casual riding (or those considering a bike in the "plush" category). When you hit a bump, you'll feel it but only about equally with almost any top-shelf carbon racing bike nowadays. For racing situations, that stiffness is important for accelerating and steering precision. Perhaps it can be said that the Lynskey balances comfort and stiffness admirably.

So, I highly recommend Lynskey for those of you wishing to ditch the carbon craze. For better or worse, this may be the last bike you'll ever buy.

Similar Products Used:

Specialized Tarmac SL, Cannondale CAAD9 and Six13, Trek Madone 2006 year

OVERALL
RATING
5
VALUE
RATING
5
[May 02, 2010]
monty
Triathlete

Strength:

amazing ride quality.
price, got a good deal on 1yr old frame off ebay.

Weakness:

if had to be critical of anything, just that i hate decals on a nice bike. wish they'd just etch'em all. i could have it done for around $300 i think but not worth the hassle.

i like another poster bought the R330 as a second bike to my Ti Tri Bike. After only 1st ride, i'm totally impressed. Bike is light (considering frame weight at around 2.8 lbs), 15 lbs by my home scale, making it very responsive on climbs and out of the saddle, power goes straight to the road. i'm 175lbs and i feel no flex, bike feels plenty stiff and amazingly smooth over various surfaces, best ride i think i've experienced (past bikes include, specialized, cervelo, other ti bike). anyway, still getting used to it but must say all the reviews i read before making this purchase were "on the money".

Similar Products Used:

specialized tarmac, cervelo P2C, Litespeed Saber

OVERALL
RATING
5
VALUE
RATING
5
[Apr 29, 2010]
steve s
Recreational Rider

This is for a 09 R330 frame that I got last October. After debating the pros and cons of different materials I settled on titanium. I'm a 58 yr old rider that prefers the label enthusiastic rider rather than recreational rider. Having owned several nice steel bikes (Colnago and Fuso) in the 1980's I was looking for a new bike to replace my Specialized S-works Aluminum frame. I wanted something handcrafted and made in the USA. There are a number of titanium bikes made in the USA. I did my homework, reading reviews posted here, on Pez as well as several others. The price of the Lynskey was definitely the deal breaker. I finally gathered up enough cash to get all my components and was able to get the bike assembled last week. I choose a Ritchey super carbon logic seat post, Ritchey wcs carbon 4-axis stem, FSA compact bar, Fizak Arione seat, Look keo max 2 pedals paired with the 2010 Sram force group, Mavic Ksyrium SL wheels, and Continental Grand Prix 4000 tires. I couldn’t be more pleased with the finished product. The bike is super smooth, crisp and sharp and just feels more responsive and lively than my Aluminum S- works. Even though I have yet to be professionally fitted, I brought my S-works to my local bike shop to compare the measurements and geometry between it and the Lynskey and the fit seems to be dialed in perfectly. No, my average speed hasn’t magically increased 2 mph, but the level of comfort I am experiencing has increased exponentially. My 5 day, 120 miles per week of riding will most definitely edge closer to 180 – 200 miles a week. The reward was well worth the wait.

OVERALL
RATING
5
VALUE
RATING
5
[Apr 15, 2010]
mylynskey09
Recreational Rider

Strength:

Stiff, Light, Well Finished. Longlasting & Comfort

Weakness:

None

Was Looking At Baum Ti Frame made locally & found Lynskey on The Web. Did some reaserch & found that the Lynskey was comparable to the Baum, but thousands odf dollars cheaper. Got my R330 frame direct from the factory. being A taller rider, I have had problems in the past with fitting with non custom made frames. I can say this was not the case with the R330. It is beautifully made, with a simplicity that belies the quality. It rides like a dream, soaking up anything my local roads can serve up. It fits like a glove & I have had little adjustment to make it comfortable. Climbs superbly, but descends almost perfectly balanced with hardly a wobble. Finished with Chris King Headset & Campagnolo Record, I could not wish for a more complete package

OVERALL
RATING
5
VALUE
RATING
5
[Apr 15, 2010]
platbr
Road Racer

Strength:

Weight, strength, stiffness, finish, performance.

Weakness:

None, although the weight will be greater than an ultralight carbon fiber frame.

Best bicycle I've owned, including carbon fiber, aluminum, and custom steel. So lively, light, and without the issues of carbon (www.bustedcarbon.com). Fit and performance are great, finish is very nice, and overall, a stunning road machine. Supple, comfortable ride, yet stiff enough to climb. I'm a big guy, so stiffness when climbing and sprinting is very important.

Similar Products Used:

Trek Madone 5.5 (dura ace); Rodriguez Custom Steel (record); Pogliaghi (record).

OVERALL
RATING
5
VALUE
RATING
5
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