DT Swiss Revolution Spokes

Available At:
Revolution

Application: ultra light wheels for Road, Track and Mountain bikes Material: X5 Cr Ni 18/10, 1.4301 Tensile strength: 1000 - 1100 N / mm² (mid-area up to 1200 N / mm²) Thread: rolled Packaging: 72, 500 (BLACK: 72) Advantages: light, stability under loads, mid-area acts as spring Certificate: DIN 79.100

User Reviews (4)

Showing 1-4 of 4  
Oswald   [Apr 19, 2014]
Strength:

Lightweight
Supercheap on most online sites
Classic look

Weakness:

Too thin for rear DS use.
May need retrueing sometimes depending on spoke pattern.

I have these on almost all of my wheels, both xc and road. I love them because they cost significantly less then the more fancy blades spokes. Almost 1/3 of the price... I do have problems with them on 1 of my roadsets. It's laced radially NDS and needs to be trued from time to time. Front is also laced radially on that set and needs less retrueing. I recommend crossing them 2x.

OVERALL
RATING
4
VALUE
RATING
5
Available At:
Will   [Apr 07, 2000]
Strength:

stealthy good looks, tried and true, strong spoke

Weakness:

no one belives they are butted until you get out a crescent wrench and show them

For a traditional metalspoke, there are very impressive. The best part is that on on Euro bikes, the butting is not apparant and does not draw attention to itself. With the ever growing popularity of specalty wheelsets such as SPOX an tseriums (however you spell it), many are forgetting about the stealthy abilities a traditional wire spoked wheel can offer.

Similar Products Used: wheelsmith machined db spokes,
OVERALL
RATING
4
VALUE
RATING
4
Bob Owen   Recreational Rider [May 31, 2000]
Strength:

Strong, light. Cheaper and better than ti.

Weakness:

Expensive for steel spokes, but Colorado Cyclist sells them for $.60 and they may be even cheaper elsewhere. (Email me if you know where.)

The best value overall for front and nondrive rear spokes. Spokes almost always break at the ends, why not radically butt them in the middle? The smoothness of the butting transition helps prevent stress risers and subsequent fractures. Wheelsmith spokes have more abrupt butting.

You can feel the difference a lighter wheelset makes. The farther the weight is from the hub, the more difference it makes in reducing rotational inertia so spokes, nipples and lightweight rims make a much bigger difference than hubs and skewers.

The exceptions to my above endorsement would be if your style/terrain throws things into the spokes like rocks, sticks, etc. Then you definitely should use a heavier butted spoke like DT Competition. MTB disc brake users shouldn't use Revolutions on the brake side either. I believe that straight gauge spokes are a waste of time and so do Jobst Brandt and Gerd Schraner.

Similar Products Used: Other DT and Wheelsmith spokes.
OVERALL
RATING
5
VALUE
RATING
5
Available At:
Fred R   Road Racer [Aug 31, 2000]
Strength:

Strong, light, cheaper than TI and without the constant adjustment as TI.

Weakness:

I have not found any yet!

At first I was hesitant to try these thinner lighter spokes but I did and I do not regret it. I have had no problems with them at all! I have not even had to adjust them yet! Now maybe thats due to 36 spokes per wheel instead of the newer 24 or even 32 I don't know; but I do know I can feel the difference in the lighter wheels. I also no longer hear the whirl the old spokes made at higher speed which leads me to believe the new ones are more efficient at slicing through the wind, either that or I getting older and my hearing has degraded!

Similar Products Used: DT straight gauge spokes.
OVERALL
RATING
5
VALUE
RATING
5
Showing 1-4 of 4  
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