9Point8 teases Fall Line 27.2 dropper post

Externally routed post coming to a gravel grinder near you soon

Interbike Parts

Interbike RoadBikeReview

Dropper posts may be a mountain bike thing, but the added control they offer is something all cyclists can benefit from.

Dropper posts may be a mountain bike thing, but the added control they offer is something all cyclists can benefit from.

The dropper post stands along with disc brakes and tubeless tires as one of the most important advancements in mountain biking. The ability to effortlessly drop your saddle to adjust for different terrain has drastically changed the way we ride.

But do we need this technology on the road side? That’s debatable. But any product that can help increase confidence when descending is worth a look. Especially given the versatility of new entries into the cyclocross and gravel bike markets. With clearance for up to 2.1” tires in some cases, these bikes can go almost anywhere.

There are currently a small number of brands offering 27.2mm dropper posts, but the vast majority are either unreliable, heavy, or only offer a small amount of drop.

Enter 9Point8. This small Canadian brand is well known in the dirt market for producing one of the most reliable and economical high-end dropper posts. Their mechanical design is dead simple, on the lighter end of the scale, and hand assembled in Ontario.

The internally routed version of the Fall Line dropper may look cleaner, but the externally routed 27.2 prototype will ensure the smaller diameter post retains the same reliability.

The internally routed version of the Fall Line dropper may look cleaner, but the externally routed 27.2 prototype will ensure the smaller diameter post retains the same reliability.

They currently offer their posts for 30.9 and 31.6 diameter seat posts, but were teasing a 27.2 version that’s close to production. This design differs from their regular Fall Line post by positioning the seat post internals in a small externally mounted box. It’s not the most svelte look, but trying to shrink the internals could otherwise negatively affect reliability. The other advantage to this design is that the post is externally routed, which means you don’t need to drill a small hole into your seat tube to install it.

9Point8 has not announced what length droppers they’ll offer in 27.2, but it’s safe to assume they’ll offer them in the 75/100/125mm increments. Their normal dropper posts can be custom tuned for specific lengths so that option may also be available for their 27.2 posts. Anyone else excited about running a dropper post on their off-road road bike?

For more info, visit www.9point8.ca.

This article is part of RoadBikeReview’s coverage of the 2016 Interbike trade show in Las Vegas. For more from Interbike CLICK HERE.

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  • David Chisem says:

    For the professional MTBer the advantages of a lower centre of gravity and reduced wind resistance maybe of significant value. But personally I find the reduced ability to pedal resulting from the fact you have now brought your knees perilously close to the handlebars, and you can no longer grip the cross bar between your knees to stabilize both yourself and the bike, the claimed advantages of a dropper post are greatly exaggerated. Furthermore the trigger on the dropper I have used for over two years provides a rather nasty knee gouging device in the unfortunate event you eject over the handlebars!

  • Tony Lapinskas says:

    Road Bike!!!!!!! My 2012 Trek Mamba and my 2013 Voodoo both need a 27.2 dropper and I’ll bet there are thousands of 27.2 mountain bikes out there who could use one.Thank God for Kind Shock as all three of my bikes are equipped with that brand. And guess what, all three combined are less than that overpriced T post. Shame.

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