First Look: New (new) SRAM HydroR and new Rival 22

Bike Press Camp Parts

SRAM RED 22 GroupsetSRAM Red 22 HydroR is back — and claimed to be better than ever.

Most companies attending Bike PressCamp send two, maybe three employees to show off their wares at the mini-cycling industry trade show held annually at Deer Valley Resort in Park City, Utah. SRAM sent a small army. The objective for these men in (and talking about) Red: continue the reputation reparation effort that’s been in effect since the damaging December recall of its road hydraulic disc brakes — and unveil a host of new products.

The Chicago-based operation dispatched what amounted to three independent PR teams, one to talk new SRAM Hydro, another to focus on the revamped Rival line, and a third to lift the lid on several new wheelsets from sister-operation Zipp, including the $3600 Firestrike detailed here.

The lead message, of course, was hydraulic disc brakes and their new-and-fixed return to the market post-recall. After what can only be characterized as one of the company’s all-time low points, or as what SRAM road product manager J.P. McCarthy simply called an outright catastrophe, model year 2015 HydroR brakes are back and claimed to be better than ever.

“We took what is normally a long development cycle and compressed it into a short period of time,” explained McCarthy, who led the HydroR presentations during the four-day pow-wow at the swanky Silver Baron Lodge. “To achieve that we had to sacrifice other projects and pull in their design resources. [SRAM president] Stan [Day] was personally in charge of the whole process. That’s how seriously we took this.”

The end result was two-fold: early road disc adapters impacted by the recall are finally receiving new redesigned replacement brakes, and soon others interested in trying the new (new) technology will have four options including 11-speed Red 22, Force 22 and Rival 22 groups, plus Force CX 1 and an S-700 10-speed option. All variants come with rim and disc options except the 1x ‘cross set-up (disc only). “Recall consumer replacement is on-going now; we’re aiming to have retail availability for the full suite of products by August 1,” added McCarthy.

Besides fixing the seal failure that was brought on by extreme cold weather and caused the recall in the first place, SRAM says it’s improved the hood shape, lever clearance, and bleed port design. “And we still very much believe in disc brakes for road bikes,” added McCarthy. “We believe it’s a safer brake. I know I’m personally happy to be back on better brakes.”

SRAM Rival 22 HydroR Levers SRAM Rival 22 CranksAlong with fixing recall issues and improving upper tier groupset offerings, SRAM trickles its 22 hydro tech down to the Rival level.

Nearly as noteworthy is the new Rival group which will allow more price-conscious shoppers an entrée into hydraulic brakes.

“The challenge with Rival is to bring technology down to hit a lower price point,” said SRAM’s Chris Zigmont, who captained the Rival PR push at PressCamp. “But that doesn’t mean the demands of the riders are any less. The Rival rider is still going to log big miles and require top-end shifting and braking performance.”

The new group’s internals are essentially the same as it’s more expensive brethren, but with heavier outerwear to lower cost. Rival 110BCD cranksets come in 50-34 or 52-36 (but no standard option.) Just like its big brothers, all 22 gears are claimed to be usable thanks in part to the front derailleur’s Yaw technology.

The rear derailleur is available in short and mid cage WiFli, which allows for up to a 32-tooth cassette. New Rival 22 will be available within the month if all goes according to plan. Price ranges from $765 for standard mechanical brake group, to $1,347 for hydraulic rim brakes, and up to $1,557 if you go full hydraulic disc.

SRAM is recommending 160mm rotors for road use and 140mm for gravel or ’cross applications for all the hydraulic groups. New Centerline rotors come in either 6-bolt or Centerlock configurations and are sold separately.

Here’s a complete rundown of all the 2015 SRAM road/cross groups with claimed weights and U.S. pricing.

SRAM Force 22 GroupsetThe full Force groupset.

SRAM RED 22 HydroR
Options:
Rim or disc (Centerline rotors sold separately)
Features: Carbon levers, Titanium hardware, Easy bleed access, Fully sealed system
Weights: Rim: 387g per wheel (Lever, Caliper, Hose 600mm) • Disc: 449g per wheel (Lever, Caliper, Hose and 160mm Centerline rotor)
MSRP: Rim: $508 per wheel (Shift-Brake hydraulic lever, hose and caliper) • Disc: $590 per wheel (Shift-Brake hydraulic lever, hose and caliper)

SRAM Force 22 HydroR

Options: Rim or disc (Centerline rotors sold separately)
Features: Carbon brake levers, Aluminum shift levers, Stainless hardware, Fully sealed system
Weights: Rim: 405g per wheel (Lever, Caliper, Hose 600mm) • Disc: 471g per wheel (Lever, Caliper, Hose and 160mm Centerline rotor)
MSRP: Rim: $421 per wheel (Shift-Brake hydraulic lever, hose and caliper) • Disc: $449 per wheel (Shift-Brake hydraulic lever, hose and caliper)

SRAM Force CX1 HydroR
Options:
Disc only (Centerline rotors sold separately)
Features: Carbon brake levers, Aluminum shifter. Stainless hardware
Weights: Right-Standard: 471g per wheel (Lever, Caliper, Hose and 140mm Center line rotor) • Left-Standard: 431g per wheel (Lever, Caliper, Hose and 140mm Center line rotor)
MSRP: Right-Standard: $449 per wheel (Shift-Brake hydraulic lever, hose and caliper)• Left-Standard: $402 per wheel (Brake hydraulic lever, hose and caliper)

SRAM Rival 22 HydroR
Options:
Rim or disc (Centerline rotors sold separately)
Features: Aluminum levers, Stainless hardware, Fully sealed system
Weights: Rim: 422g per wheel (Lever, Caliper, Hose 600mm) • Disc: 493g per wheel (Lever, Caliper, Hose and 160mm Centerline rotor)
MSRP: Rim: $334 per wheel (Shift-Brake hydraulic lever, hose and caliper) • Disc: $384 per wheel (Shift-Brake hydraulic lever, hose and caliper)

S-700 HydroR (10-speed compatible)

Options: Rim or disc (Centerline rotors sold separately)
Features: 10 Speed Compatible Only, aluminum Shift and Brake levers, Stainless hardware, Quick Release, Tools-free contact pad adjust, Tire clearance: 28c, Firecrest rim compatibility (27.4mm)
Weights: Rim: 422g per wheel (Lever, Caliper, Hose 600mm) • Disc: 493g per wheel (Lever, Caliper, Hose and 160mm Centerline rotor)
MSRP: Rim: $398 per wheel – Includes Shift-Brake hydraulic lever, hose and caliper) • Disc: $469 per wheel – Includes Shift-Brake hydraulic lever, hose and caliper

Centerline Rotor
Options:
140mm or 160mm
MSRP: 140mm: $44 • 160mm: $55

First Look: New (new) SRAM HydroR and new Rival 22 Gallery
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SRAM Rival 22 Cassette

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SRAM Rival 22 Brake

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SRAM Rival 22 Front Derailleur

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SRAM Rival 22 Rear Derailleur

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SRAM Rival 22 Cranks

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SRAM Rival 22 Centerline Rotor

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SRAM Rival 22 Levers

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SRAM Rival 22 HydroR Levers

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SRAM Rival 22 Chain

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SRAM S-700 Brake Lever

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SRAM S-700 Disc Brake Caliper

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SRAM-S-700 Rim Brake

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SRAM RED 22 Hydraulic Brake Lever

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SRAM RED 22 Rim Brake

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SRAM RED 22 Disc Brake

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SRAM RED 22 Groupset

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SRAM Force HRR Brake

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SRAM Force HRD Brake

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SRAM Force CX1 Groupset

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SRAM Force CX1 Brake Lever: Left-standard

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SRAM-Force-CX1-Brake Lever

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SRAM Force CX1 Brake Lever

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SRAM Force 22 Shift Brake Lever

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SRAM Force 22 Groupset

About the author: Jason Sumner

An avid cyclist, Jason Sumner has been writing about two-wheeled pursuits of all kinds since 1999. He’s covered the Tour de France, the Olympic Games, and dozens of other international cycling events. He also likes to throw himself into the fray, penning first-person accounts of cycling adventures in British Columbia, Belgium, Brazil, Costa Rica, France, and Peru among many others. Sumner, who joined the RoadBikeReview.com / Mtbr.com staff in January, 2013, has also done extensive gear testing and edited a book on cycling tips. When not writing or riding, the native Coloradoan can be found enjoying the great outdoors with his wife Lisa.


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