How much faster is an aerodynamic position?

Watch this video to find out difference between various body positions

Aero Video
Get low to get faster. Just make sure you train in this position so your body is used to it.

Get low to get faster. Just make sure you train in this position so your body is used to it (click to enlarge).

The cycling industry — and especially Specialized — is fond of telling us that aero is everything. But it’s not all marketing mumbo jumbo. It’s a proven fact that air resistance accounts for much of the drag you feel on a bike. But while the latest and greatest aero gear can certainly help, it is you the rider who accounts for the biggest impediment to speed. So how big a difference can body position make in aerodynamic efficiency? Check out this video from our friends at the Global Cycling Network to get some answers.

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  • Charie Brown says:

    The experiment is invalid.
    The riders are drafting, although partially, behind the car carrying the camera.

  • RGRHON says:

    When road racing, your position has to adapt to your effort level and terrain as well as drafting and gust dynamics. Terrain is rarely this flat and courses rarely this short. I suspect over a long race that the percentage change is significantly lower, a point conveniently ignored by industry in every industry aero test, but not by the pros, many of whom still ride non-aero bikes. Bicycle racers are not aircraft. Just for starters, your test doesn’t define your ‘aero’ and ‘non-aero’ positions in terms of your reduced cross-sectional area. Wind speed and direction was not taken. All in all, you’ve simply added media confusion to industry confusion by implying aero is significantly better, but not by truly quantifying it, I have to say though that as lame as it is, your test is probably as good as any performed in the past by industry in any constant speed wind tunnel. If this was indeed just sarcasm, then great job!

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