Interbike: Hiplok DC wearable bike lock and cable combo

U-lock with cable clips to belt and bag straps for easy, comfy carry

Gear Interbike Urban

Interbike RoadBikeReview

Hiplok DC Cover

British industrial designers John Abrahams and Ben Smith share a mutual contempt for carrying unwieldy bike locks. Inspired by bike messengers and urban riders who circumvented the problem by wearing their chains or cables as a belt, the duo came up with the Hiplok–a refined version of the concept that netted the company a prestigious Eurobike Design Award back in 2013.

This year they’re back with the DC, a $90 wearable U-lock and cable combo that clips to a bag strap or belt for comfortable transport. And if you’re wondering about the name, “D” is for D-lock–the UK’s term for a U-lock–and “C” is for cable.

Hiplok DC Lock and Cable

The DC clips to either a bag strap, belt or pcoket (right) and includes a reflective plastic bridge that carries the included cable.

Like the original Hiplok, the DC is a simple and elegant solution that makes the lock’s heft disappear, particularly when clipped to a messenger bag strap. The U-lock itself boasts a “Silver” rating from lock standards group Sold Secure and adds a cable to loop through wheels and other parts. A snap-on plastic bridge carries the cable during transport.

For more information visit hiplok.com

This article is part of RoadBikeReview’s coverage of the 2014 Interbike trade show in Las Vegas. For more from Interbike CLICK HERE.

Photo Thumbnails (click to enlarge)
About the author: Don Palermini

Chicago-born editorial director Don Palermini became a cycling-based life-form in the sixth grade after completing a family road bike tour of his home state. Three years later he bought his first mountain bike to help mitigate the city's pothole-strewn streets, and began exploring the region's unpaved roads and trails. Those rides sparked a much larger journey which includes all manner of bike racing, commuting, on- and off-road bike advocacy, and a 20-plus-year marketing career in the cycling industry. Now residing in the San Francisco Bay Area and pedaling for Mtbr, his four favorite words in the English language are "breakfast served all day," together in that order.


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