Mavic Intros CXR 60 C and CXR 60 T Aero Wheels

Aero Wheels

French wheel maker Mavic is at it again. After debuting its new Cosmic Carbone 40C carbon clinchers earlier in the year, it’s rolling out an aero 60mm hoop it claims is every bit the wind cheater as rival offerings from the likes of Zipp and Reynolds. The new Cosmic Carbone CXR 60 is the shallower, next generation version of Mavic’s first aero offering, the CXR 80.

Just like the CXR 80, which debuted last year, the new CXR 60 is part of a wheel-and-tire system. Mavic claims the tire and rim are shaped to fit perfectly together and flow as a single unit. The gap between wheel and tire is sealed by the CX 01 snap-in blade, technology that also comes from the CXR 80s.

Availability in the U.S. is planned for September, with pricing anticipated between $2700 and $2800. The tubular version (front wheel pictured above) tips the scales at a claimed 1645 grams per pair without tires (730 front/915 rear), and 2175 grams (995 front/915 rear) when you add rubber to the equation.

Similarly the clinchers are 1825 grams per pair without tire (820 front/1005 rear) and 2515 grams with tires (1165 front/1350 rear).

But Mavic’s big marketing story with the new wheels is not weight — it’s all aero all the time. “Extensive wind tunnel testing against a wide variety of competitor wheels and tires has clearly demonstrated the aerodynamic benefit of integrating the wheel and tire profile into a seamless airfoil shape,” reads the press release that showed up in our in-box Thursday morning. “Just as with the CXR 80, the new 60mm profiles used in both the clincher and tubular version are inspired by NACA airfoils.”

Mavic claims that in addition to low frontal drag, the CXR 60 wheels have high lateral stability for better handling in crosswinds. And that across a range of yaw angles, side force against the wheels changes in a very predictable manner.

“All wind tunnel testing has been performed in Geneva with a stress balance created by Mavic engineers to measure not just translational drag force, but also lateral force and spinning force,” continues the release.

Unlike the 80mm depth wheels, which are available in tubular only, the new 60mm come tubular or clincher, aka the CXR 60 T and CXR 60 C. The CXR 60 C gets the Exalith 2 aluminum tire bed and brake track, which Mavic claims provides 18 percent shorter stopping distance compared to a standard aluminum brake track.

We have a test pair on order and will report back findings as soon as possible. In the meantime here are all the tech specs and pictures of the new wheels.

CXR 60 Tubular
60mm NACA-inspired profile with CX 01 blades to unify tire and rim
• 16 front/20 rear bladed, butted stainless steel spokes
• Stiff aluminum axles and large sealed bearings
• CX 01 GripLink front tire/PowerLink rear tire
• 1645gm per pair without tire (730 front/915 rear)
• 2175gm wheel-tire system weight (995 front/915 rear)

CXR 60 Clincher
• 60mm NACA-inspired profile with CX 01 blades to unify tire and rim
• 16 front/20 rear bladed, butted stainless steel spokes
• Stiff aluminum axles and large sealed bearings
• CX 01 GripLink front tire/PowerLink rear tire
• 1825gm per pair without tire (820 front/1005 rear)
• 2515gm wheel-tire system weight (1165 front/1350 rear)

Mavic Intros CXR 60 C and CXR 60 T Aero Wheels Gallery
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About the author: Jason Sumner

An avid cyclist, Jason Sumner has been writing about two-wheeled pursuits of all kinds since 1999. He’s covered the Tour de France, the Olympic Games, and dozens of other international cycling events. He also likes to throw himself into the fray, penning first-person accounts of cycling adventures in British Columbia, Belgium, Brazil, Costa Rica, France, and Peru among many others. Sumner, who joined the RoadBikeReview.com / Mtbr.com staff in January, 2013, has also done extensive gear testing and edited a book on cycling tips. When not writing or riding, the native Coloradoan can be found enjoying the great outdoors with his wife Lisa.


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