Review: Voler Black Label Cycling Collection

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On the bottom half, the gripper-less “Power Band” leg openings had me worried the legs of the shorts might creep up–Voler’s web site even notes this may be the case. Though a potential concern for riders with extremely skinny thighs, the combination of the high-compression fabrics along with doubled-over cuffs kept the edges where they belong and felt extremely comfortable–more so, in fact, than traditional silicon or elastic grippers.

Voler paid attention to details large and small, from the excellent CyTech HP padding, to the two-piece collar, to the reflective band along the rear pockets.

A long distance-rated synthetic chamois–the CyTech HP from Italian supplier Elastic Interface–lines the bib shorts and performs beautifully. Its seamless construction and low-profile design provides a comfortable interface free of both chafing and that pillow-between-the-legs feel of some pads. Notably, several other high-end manufacturers also use the CyTech HP, usually on higher price point shorts.

As extras go, the use of hidden-until-needed reflective materials, and well-proportioned and tensioned rear pockets highlight the kind of consideration Voler brought to every detail. While I found the zippered key/phone pocket a little hard to use, it’s the smallest of niggles and will likely work just fine with some practice.

As a complete experience, Voler’s Black Label has what I can only describe as a disappeared feeling of comfort. That is to say the garments feel hardly there–seamless and undistracting, and near weightless even when sweat soaked. If they could only make these not get dirty, I’d wear them every ride.

Voler’s PowerBand arm openings hold firmly to the bicep without creating a pressure point. Photo by Voler.

For now there are only five pieces in the Black Label collection–the $99 men’s and women’s short sleeve jerseys; the $109 men’s and women’s shorts; and the $119 men’s bib shorts. Women’s pieces come in five sizes from small to extra large, while the men’s selections add a sixth size, double extra large. Barker predicts they’ll add additional colors next spring and may incorporate more Black Label features into their team kits as well. Black Label thermals and outerwear are also in the works.

As if performance, comfort and price weren’t enough, Voler brings national pride to the equation despite their French-sounding name.

“We do all our manufacturing here in Grover Beach, California,” said Barker. “We source our jersey fabrics in the US, our performance spandex and specialty fabrics in Italy, and zippers in the US and Canada. All of our threads, elastic and heat transfers are from the US and we always choose a US supplier if we can.”

Voler Black Label Cycling Collection

  • Men’s SS Jersey, MSRP: $99 (tested)
  • Men’s Bib Shorts, MSRP: $119 (tested)
  • Men’s Short, MSRP: $109
  • Women’s SS Jersey, MSRP: $99
  • Women’s Shorts, MSRP: $109
  • Sizes: Men’s: XS, S, M, L, XL, XXL; Women’s: XS, S, M, L, XL
  • Colors: Black, Black with red (shorts and bibs only)
  • Available: now
  • Country of origin: Made in USA from US, Canadian and Italian components

For more information visit voler.com.

Review: Voler Black Label Cycling Collection Gallery
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Voler Black Label Pocket

A zippered pocket keeps devices secure and away from the back. Photo by Voler.
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Voler Black Label Jersey

Despite the use of black fabric, the Black Label fabric is sheer and feels no warmer than other colors.
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Voler Black Label Jersey

The subdued yet stylish Black label jersey is a refreshing departure for Voler.
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Voler Black Label PowerBand

Voler’s PowerBand arm openings hold firmly to the bicep without creating a pressure point. Photo by Voler.
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Voler Black Label Genesis Fabric

The slim Genesis fabric side panel both provides a nice visual line as well as compliments the high-compression functionality of the rest of the bibs. Photo by Voler.
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Voler Black Label

Voler paid attention to details large and small, from the excellent CyTech HP padding, to the two-piece collar, to the reflective band along the rear pockets.
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Voler Black Label Genesis Fabric

The use of Voler’s lightweight, scalloped Genesis fabric helps keep the bib strap and yoke from feeling hot.
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Voler Black Label

The Black Label features cuts for both men and women. Photo by Voler.
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Voler Black Label

Voler’s stealthy Black Label kit prefers the understated over the ‘rolling billboard’ look. Photo by Voler.
About the author: Don Palermini

Chicago-born editorial director Don Palermini became a cycling-based life-form in the sixth grade after completing a family road bike tour of his home state. Three years later he bought his first mountain bike to help mitigate the city's pothole-strewn streets, and began exploring the region's unpaved roads and trails. Those rides sparked a much larger journey which includes all manner of bike racing, commuting, on- and off-road bike advocacy, and a 20-plus-year marketing career in the cycling industry. Now residing in the San Francisco Bay Area and pedaling for Mtbr, his four favorite words in the English language are "breakfast served all day," together in that order.


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  • Dick Voss says:

    I do not think that they should may bike jersey in black as they are very hard to see on the road, and especially for winter as it is even worse to see riders in black jerseys. That is just my observation as a biker for many years, Also black tops/jerseys are hard to see when someone is making an signal to turn is very hard to see.
    Thank You, Dick Voss

  • Darell says:

    Fortunately, they now have “invisible against the asphault” gray (with bright green accents)… and also red.

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