Sea Otter: BodyFloat comfort seatpost by Cirrus Cycles

This isolation seatpost is designed to improve rider comfort and performance.

Parts Sea Otter Classic

2015 Sea Otter Classic

The BodyFloat isolation seatpost is designed to increase rider comfort and performance.

The BodyFloat isolation seatpost is designed to increase rider comfort and performance (click to enlarge).

Cirrus Cycles is a new company based out of Bellingham, WA and I met their co-founder, Charlie Heggem at the Sea Otter Classic recently and he was showing his brand new product called the BodyFloat. The BodyFloat is an isolation seatpost designed to improve the comfort and performance of the rider regardless of what kind of bike they ride.

Heggem calls the BodyFloat a motor mount because it connects the engine (the rider) and the chassis (the bike) together in the “most effective way”. He continues, “It’s not a suspension seatpost until you actually sit on it and then you become part of the suspension system.”

Simple snug fitting lycra cover ($10) with drawstring to protect your BodyFloat from the elements. Made of recycled fabric in Bellingham, WA.

Simple snug fitting lycra cover ($10) with drawstring to protect your BodyFloat from the elements. Made of recycled fabric in Bellingham, WA (click to enlarge).

At the Sea Otter, Heggem was displaying the BodyFloat on his own personal Calfee Manta Pro but the BodyFloat will work on almost any kind of bike. “We don’t care if it’s on a 4″ travel XC bike or a 15 lbs road bike or a 60 lbs electric bike …you tune this differently for whatever mechanism you have underneath and whatever body you have on top.” explains Heggem.

The tuning is done by making two different changes. You can change out the dual springs for springs of varying spring rate. The rider can also adjust the spring tension by loosening or tightening the rear preload bolt. For on the go adjustments, there is also a hand-tune knob available.

Hand-tune preload adjuster backed all the way out.

Hand-tune adjuster backed all the way out (click to enlarge).

Heggem explains the tuning a bit, “On my cross bike right here with this spring rate, I use about 3 and a quarter turns of preload. So that’s where I become nice and stable at about 90 rpm cadence…so I have no pedal induced bounce or movement but the bike is able to move freely underneath me.” He further explains that it is best to start by establishing a foundation to stabilize the motor on top of the chassis.

Another feature that Heggem points out, is that the BodyFloat helps the rider spread the load over more contact points. He says, “The BodyFloat allows you to spread the mass of the engine (rider weight) among more than just the feet and hands under a bump (you stand up when you hit a bump so your hands and feet take the impact). So now, you can spread that mass out between your hands, your feet and your rear end. This lets your legs do more of the work with less effort.”

The BodyFloat isolation seatpost comes in aluminum, titanium and carbon versions.

The BodyFloat isolation seatpost comes in aluminum, titanium and carbon versions (click to enlarge).

The BodyFloat is available in aluminum, titanium and carbon versions and varying sizes and prices. The aluminum version comes in 27.2×350, 31.6×350 and 31.6x420mm sizes with a retail price of $249.00. The titanium version comes in 27.2x420mm with a retail price of $415.00. The carbon comes in 27.2×330 or 27.2x380mm with a retail price of $395.00. Shims are available for larger sizes and larger seatposts and different pairs of springs are also available for $10. While we didn’t get a chance to personal test the BodyFloat, we may get one in for testing soon. Check here for a list of independent dealers stocking the Cirrus Cycles BodyFloat.

For more information or to order a BodyFloat online visit: www.cirruscycles.com.

This article is part of RoadBikeReview’s coverage of the 2015 Sea Otter Classic in Monterey, California. For more from Sea Otter CLICK HERE.

Photo Thumbnails (click to enlarge)
About the author: Gregg Kato

Gregg Kato studied journalism and broadcasting in college while working many different jobs including deejaying, driving a forklift and building web sites (not all at the same time). Kato enjoys riding local Portolla Valley roads. Besides being an avid cyclist, he is also a motorcycle fanatic. Two wheels, one Passion.


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