Specialized Power Pro saddle review

Short-nosed perch designed for aggressive riding position

Saddle
Specialized’s Power Pro is aimed at riders in aggressive positions. A large cutout and wide base offer a stiff platform from which to produce power.

Specialized’s Power Pro is aimed at riders in aggressive positions. A large cutout and wide base offer a stiff platform from which to produce power.

Lowdown: Specialized Power Pro Saddle

Designed for an aggressive riding position, the intriguing short-nosed Specialized Power Pro saddle offers seated comfort during extended tip-of-the-saddle efforts. With several models, three widths, and two levels of cushioning, the Power is an attractive option for a wide variety of riders.

Stat Box
Weight: 207 grams (143mm, Ti rails/carbon shell) Price: $200
Options: 143mm or 155mm widths, carbon or Ti rails, black or red colorways Rating: 4.5 Stars 4.5 out of 5 stars

Pluses
Minuses
  • Excellent shape for aggressive riding positions
  • Stiff shell not for everyone
  • Multiple widths, rail options, colors, and padding depths
  • Odd look

Review: Specialized Power Pro Saddle

Humanity is a wonder, full of people of different shapes and sizes. This diversity can be an asset but also a burden, especially for those trying to design products that interface directly with human anatomy. In cycling, arguably the most important connection between rider and machine is the saddle. Unfortunately, for many, discomfort is assumed as a required element of cycling. This is not even remotely the case. But finding saddle nirvana can require lots of trial and error, which can be a painful experience.

The carbon base of the Power Pro is quite stiff. For those seeking a bit more cushion, look at the Expert model which receives thicker padding.

The carbon base of the Power Pro is quite stiff. For those seeking a bit more cushion, look at the Expert model which receives thicker padding.

During my 25 years of cycling, I’ve ridden lots of saddles. Recently, as my yearly mileage figures have steadily climbed, I’ve experimented with saddles, both traditional and outlandish. One of the more interesting ones that crossed my path is Specialized’s Power saddle, which was launched in March 2015. Designed with an aggressive position in mind, I like its shape for road riding even when I’m not pinning it.

Specialized recommends setting the Power up so the forward section of the saddle is level, with the rear then offering an angled surface to push against.

Specialized recommends setting the Power up so the forward section of the saddle is level, with the rear then offering an angled surface to push against.

Specialized recommends starting with the nose of the Power three centimeters behind that of a more conventional perch. I ended up with it even farther behind the bottom bracket. Once there though, I was almost instantly comfortable. Perhaps I lucked into a good angle, but with the nose only slightly down, I was a happy camper. (Specialized recommends leveling the front section of the saddle, making the rear of the saddle sweep upwards slightly.)

Continue to page 2 for more of our Specialized Power Pro saddle review

About the author: Nick Legan

Nick Legan is happiest with some grease under his nails and a long dirt climb ahead. As a former WorldTour team mechanic, Legan plied his trade at all the Grand Tours, Spring Classics, World Championships and even the 2008 Beijing Olympics. In recent years, gravel and ultra-distance racing has a firm grip on Legan’s attention, but his love of mountain biking and long road rides hasn’t diminished. Originally a Hoosier, Legan settled in Boulder, Colorado, 14 years ago after finishing his time at Indiana University studying French and journalism. He served as the technical editor at VeloNews for two years and now contributes to Adventure Cyclist, Mtbr and RoadBikeReview.


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