Yahoo! Cycling Team’s 2010 Fuji SL-1 Pro – Pro Review

Feature Articles Pro Review

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The Fuji SL-1 Pro is a bike meant for training and racing. It’s a little heavier than the top of the line SL-1 RC, but it’s also beefier. Fuji’s C-7 tubing is meant to take punishment year after year with very little fatigue. It is also spec’d with heavier, though more durable, aluminum stem, handlebars, and seatpost. If you look around at the tour bikes, you’ll find the pros riding aluminum cockpits for their strength (and less catastrophic failure), and this bike follows that mold. It also features SRAM Force–and though it is slightly heavier than SRAM Red, it looks like the 2010 Force is actually better than last year’s Red.

The Yahoo! Cycling Team will be riding this exact bike with a few component changes:

  • Deda will be providing handlebar, stem, and seatpost
  • San Marco will provide the saddles
  • TRP will provide brakes
  • Challenge will provide tires

Performance
This really is a great all around bike and I felt comfortable on it immediately. It’s stiff, vibration free, and extremely predictable in all conditions. On a recent 55 mile ride with over 5200 feet of climbing, I was pleasantly surprised by how comfortable the bike was. It climbed well with no flex and very little noise; the components really work well together and it was nice to have the 39×26 bail gear. The steering felt a little slow (definitely not twitchy), likely due to the 45 degree fork offset, though it didn’t bother me. More importantly, the bike descended with confidence. Out on the flats, I was even able to come from behind and win the “sprint to the sign”, though the incredible wheels definitely made me feel like I was cheating.

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About the author: Twain Mein

Twain Mein has been a fan of mtbr.com & roadbikereview.com since 1996. After meeting Francis, he became fascinated with the technology and gear aspect of cycling and became one of our first product reviewers. Twain has been doing triathlons since 1987 and was ranked in the Top 50 U.S. National Age Group in 2012. He’s recently been learning swimming tips from his 10 year-old daughter who has way more natural talent!


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  • CliveDS says:

    Looks light, Fast and ready for some racing. Good Luck Guys!

  • ZenNMotion says:

    Great bike, poor review. Can someone who actually has an understanding of bike/frame design please write the “Pro Reviews”? Example- 45 “deg” of fork “angle” (offset) is “slack” resulting in “slow steering”? Really? The HT angle isn’t noted (72deg on a large) but it’s decidedly neutral in trail. And a 12cm stem would be entirely appropriate on the large size for most riders in that range, the 6′ tall tester is used to a 10cm stem on his own bike? Really? Get yourself to a fitter, you got the wrong bike! The average reader contemplating a $4,000+ bicycle is likely more sophisticated and expecting a more insightful “pro review” than that offered here. At least “torsionally stiff and vertically compliant” wasn’t mentioned… Sheesh guys, is this the best you can do?

  • alexcad5 says:

    ZenNMotions comments were a bit harsh, but it is true the reviewer has a little to learn about geometry and how it effects the ride. The fork rake is measured in mm not degrees. You wouldn’t know that if someone didn’t tell you, since it never says in the literature how it is measured. Also, as mentioned, a bike with a slack fork will have a faster steering, not a slower steering, however a slack head tube will make for a slow steering bike. It is normal for a bike with a slack head tube to have a slack fork – usually to eliminate toe overlap.
    The last thing zen mentioned was the stem. Zen assumes that the tester was on a bike too big for him, an assumption that may not be right. If the tester has long legs and a short reach, a smaller bike will have too short a head tube for him.
    The tester on the other hand should have opted to replace the stem for a shorter one, rather than moving the seat forward.

  • TimK says:

    I love this bike, even though I don’t own it. But someday it will be mine.

  • Twain says:

    Good feedback, ZenNMotion and alexcad5. Apologies for the mistake on the fork rake–and thanks for the knowledge. The head tube angle is mentioned at the very start, as well.
    Regarding the stem, I am more of a triathlete than road rider, and I’m used to being farther forward. And, yes, I could have switched out the stem, but I wanted to try the stock parts.
    I have a 100mm stem on this
    http://www.roadbikereview.com/reviews/blog/ritchey-superlogic-carbon-46-clinchers-pro-review/
    (and i wish I had those wheels!)

  • mikethebike says:

    Twain-

    Completely understandable that you gave that review considering you now mention you are more of a TT. When you said that you were going to take off the stem and “just move the seat forward”…I was like “WHHaattt??”. So you betrayed the fact that you are a TT right there

    I see by the link you provided that you have a road bike.

    I am only too happy to review that bike for the good of the biking community. Ship it to me. I put a few thousand miles on it and let you know what I think of it.

    Deal?

    Fuji has made some impressive bikes this year at great price points.

    Can you tell me why TT riders sit so far forward? I know its more aero, but they seem to be aero at a massive expensive of NOT using the hamstrings and back. Armstrong(not my favorite rider, but I think he did some interesting things other than in the lab) sat relatively farther back and sat lower and pedaled with a high cadence. Why don’t the other riders do this?

    Thanks in advance@!!! and sorry about the long question.

    Mike

  • Rick says:

    I have ridden this bike for 2 century rides and it really is that good! Quick and sharp handling this bike climbs like nothing I have ever ridden. I would highly reccomend this bike.

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