Pegoretti Cicli Marcelo 2002 Road Bike

DESCRIPTION

Made from Dedacciai Custom E.O.M. Steel Boron tubing. Cylindrical tubes for both the front and rear triangle. The cylindrical tubes have been chosen for ride qualities over ovalized tubes. The rear stays are 24mm in diameter and are joined to a set of Pegoretti 'Forcellini' 2-piece stainless steel drop outs; the seat stays are 18mm in diameter. Uses a 1 1/8 head tube supplied with a Mizuno full carbon A-head fork.

USER REVIEWS

Showing 1-7 of 7  
[Aug 05, 2008]
Vitix2
Recreational Rider

OVERALL
RATING
3
VALUE
RATING
4
Strength:

stoutness, stiffness, straight tracking ability and agile handling.

Weakness:

The Reynolds Ouzo Pro fork that comes with the frame is too flexible for me. Again, I'm a clydesdale +, and the fork is not whippy or anything, but I've got to be able to throw my weight around on the front end without feeling the wheel magnet from my computer slapping against the sensor. It's not an adjustment issue, it's fork flex.

Just went for a ride on my newly built up Pegoretti Marcelo. My first impressions are positive, but I still have plenty of fine tuning to do regarding my position, so treat this as an initial review.

First impression...Relative lightness, stability, stoutness, good handling geometry.

This is the lightest bike in my stable and it's steel. That is not suppossed to be. I was willing to compromise on weight so I could reep the benefits of a handmade Pegoretti. As it turns out, there is no sacrifice. I'm 250 lbs so I'm not attracted to super light bikes, but I've got this thing built up to about 17 lbs with no super light stuff and not really paying a whole bunch of attention to the weight of the components that I hung on it. It's outfitted with Record 10, Neutron Ultra's, and Deda stem and bars.

It feels very solid. That is the first thing that I noticed. Not just stiff or strong, but solid. It's as if I'm riding an SUV that handles like an M3. No flex of any note (other than the fork, which I'll be replacing). It also has steels traditional snap, which I'll have to become reaquainted with.

The geometry also seems to position right where you need to be for an effecient climbing stroke, and it feels like it would still feel good after 4 hours in the saddle.

So far, so good, but I'll have to put in many more miles to offer a more complete review. I gave a 3 rating (neutral) because it will take a few more hours in the saddle to be able to say for certain how this frame compares to others I've ridden. Howevere, all indications so far are that it will more than do the job, and do it comfortably and in style.

Similar Products Used:

Eddy Merckx Premium
Pinarello Stelvio
Casato Gold Line
Olmo Gara Pista

[Jul 04, 2006]
chrisvu05
Recreational Rider

OVERALL
RATING
5
VALUE
RATING
4
Strength:

great power transfer
soaks up the road buzz
beautiful hand made styling

Weakness:

a little expensive
a little heavy but worth it
i'm afraid to ride it because it is so beautiful and I don't want to mess it up.

This bike was a drastic change for me. I went from a Cannondale CAAD 7 aluminum bike to a custom steel masterpiece of a Pegoretti. This bike is absolutely amazing. It soaks up the road buzz but is extremely stiff because of the huge but skinny seat stays. I'm a big guy at about 250lbs and this bike has no give to it when I stand up and sprint....straight power transfer...It is heavier than the CAAD 7 but that is to be expected. The pegoretti descends like it is on rails. I've had it in the high 40s (mph) and it has never felt jittery...it is solid as a rock. I'm just sad because I've found my dream bike and it is only the second bike i've ever owned...I've put a little over 1400 miles on it in the 3 months that I've owned it.

Similar Products Used:

none

[Sep 26, 2004]
Anonymous
Recreational Rider

OVERALL
RATING
5
VALUE
RATING
5
Strength:

Low weight for steel. Great colors and graphics available. Agility and responsiveness. Big, but not too big, round tubes give a cool but traditional look.

Weakness:

Paint finish is nice but not equal to high end US frames and all the clear coats but it is still really good looking. My only regret is not getting one when the exchange rate was in our favor. Thin steel tubing requires rust-proofing and care.

After riding a very pretty Richard Sachs bike for several years, I started to research new bike frames and materials and kept running across people raving about Pegoretti Marcelos. I spoke with a bunch of folks--dealers and owners-and finally ordered one. Mine took about 6 months to get with a custom paint scheme through Lantern Rouge in Maryland. It was worth the wait; the frame is terrific. Out here in New England cycling is a mix of hills and short flats. This frame is the best I've ever ridden up hills and you can almost feel the efficient transfer of energy from cranks to the rear wheel. On fast (40 mph+) downhills it is confidently connected to the road and has yet to feel like it is approaching any limits. On flats I can go a little more quickly, am using smaller gears than I had been, and it seems easier to maintain a cadence in the 90 range. And, it is really comfortable-- the combination of the carbon fork (my first) and the Pegoretti geometry is remarkably smooth and comfy for me, the aging athelete. I ride the same routes frequently and on the Marcelo the road surfaces seem smoother and less patchy. This bike is a lot of fun--a beautiful combination of high-end technical frame building and simple good looks. Surprizing how many bikers never heard of these great frames.

Similar Products Used:

Richard Sachs, Guerciotti, Frejus (yes, I'm that old), Bottecchia, Campagnolo Chorus, Record, the usual. etc.

[Aug 18, 2003]
Toothpick
Recreational Rider

OVERALL
RATING
5
VALUE
RATING
5
Strength:

Looks great, handles wonderfully. Stiff but not harsh. Don't see many of them.

Weakness:

None

After much thought, I placed my Marcelo order. Stock geometry, size 54. Two months later, it arrived. The paint is beautiful and the thick chainstays and dropouts really set off the look. While not as light as some aluminum counterparts, the bike is anything but heavy, and the ride is responsive. The combination of the steel frame with carbon fork and seatpost really dampens vibrations. The steering is not overly quick, and the ride is very stable. First ride was great, with a nice 40 mph downhill-smooth as glass. Instead of standing for a short but steep hill as usual, I easily spun instead. Last hill of the ride, instead of holding back, I attacked as I had so much energy than at the same point on my previous bike. This frame is not flexy, but does have the nice steel springingess. If you're thinking light steel or Ti, this one still gets my vote.

[May 09, 2002]
Jay Dwight
Road Racer

OVERALL
RATING
5
VALUE
RATING
5
Strength:

Everything that is necessary for going fast is built into this frameset. There is a certain alchemy in building frames that does not translate into charts showing lengths and angles. Only when one puts a leg over the bike, and has the power to make it go, does the true nature of its ability come clear. The Marcelo distills twenty-odd years of building frames for division one teams, and delivers it to those lucky souls, like myself, who have the wherewithall to enjoy the fruits of Dario Pegoretti''s labor. So, going fast, race fast, is this bike''s strength. Only two bikes I have ever owned compare with this, and those are a Confente Masi that I rode for 25 years, and a DeRosa Track bike that I still ride. The Breezer #23 compares, but it is a mountain bike.

Weakness:

Well, under normal circumstances I would take issue with the slight irregularities there are on this frame. The bottle bosses on the downtube were well out of alignment, for instance. On another bike, it would have bugged me to the point of replacing it. But every time I ride this bike, I am so thoroughly blown away by how well it does everything required to make speed, and control it, that I don''t care. That''s right, the old Italian adage, just ride the thing, applies completely in this case. Paint never bothers me, unless it is hiding a multitude of sins. The first nick takes care of that issue, and I repaint my frames when they need it.

Having ridden 1200 miles a month on this bike, through the winter and into the spring, I have a good sense of its particular merits. They are legion. This bike may have equals, but nothing surpasses it. If you are in the market for an absolutely full-on race bike, that will fly uphill and down and egg you on from the moment you clip in, this is the one. Its stability in close quarters makes hammering short climbs in the pack stress-free, even when rubbing shoulders with another cyclist. Tip off the edge of a 20% downhill, and lay off the brakes-this bike is so dead-on straight and true that you''ll just sit up into the wind to slow for the turns. Climb four miles of 7% grade, and you''ll use a 21 where a 23 was your former choice. You''ll be sore when you get home, but there will be a smile on your face. It''s light, it''s very stiff, and best of all, it''s steel, which means that despite being very thin-walled, the tubing will stand up to many years'' abuse without any nagging worry about catastrophic failure.

Similar Products Used:

DeRosa Track, Ron Cooper Track, Road, Touring; Confente Masi; Team Issue Fuji; Bianchi;

[Mar 18, 2002]
karim assfahany
Road Racer

OVERALL
RATING
5
VALUE
RATING
5
Strength:

sss

Weakness:

ssss

While many manufactures have plumped for carbon fibre. Pegoretti''s Marcelo is made from the finest steel. Robert Millar rides it and loves its springy response. As far as desirability goes a simple steel bike won''t be very high up on the list of the modern day racer or even those who don''t seek speed; at least not in this day of age of fat alloy and composite assemblies. Memories of the floppy, bendy, attempts of the previous generation to build something lightweight out of steel are hard to forget and even when the level of performance was acceptable, the weight of the frame certainly wouldn''t be. To those who have grown up in the carbon-for-everything-and-everywhere era, something made out of a material that might rust, must seem prehistoric. So it could seem a bit pointless to bother with steel tubes at all, unless you want a retro bike like the Independent Fabrication tested previously, but fundamentally the material does suit bike frames well. A bike like the one the Pegoretti brothers have put together here just shows just what level of performance you can get from the latest tubes built with the latest techniques, it may not look very modern with it''s plain white paint and simple graphics, but once ridden, all preconceptions disappear. Dedaciai''s EOM tubeset has been widely adopted by many people to make their top steel frame so when the guys who did the development of EOM before it was let loose on the market produce their own tweaked version, something spectacular could well be expected. Having seen the level of craftsmanship and skill used to make these frames on Procycling''s visit to their workshops at the start of last year I can''t see any reason why this won''t happen. I think I referred to jewelry when I described these so I''m expecting no disappointments. In terms of ride and handling the Marcelo is right up there with the best of them and of all the bikes available to try at a Megatest I conducted in Spain, this was the one I would always recommend to people if they didn''t know what to choose. They soon discovered that behind the simple exterior lies a range of qualities that only come with pedigree machines. All those that rode the steel Pegoretti came back impressed by what it has to offer. The ride, in particular, stands out for it''s ability to smooth out the constant buzz thrown up f

Similar Products Used:

sssss

[Mar 05, 2002]
bill
Recreational Rider

OVERALL
RATING
5
VALUE
RATING
5
Strength:

Road feel is just right. Precise handling. Unusual (although what I''ve heard more than anything is "Nice Peugot!").

Weakness:

Maybe it''s me, but the paint, while pretty, seems a bit soft. It also came with this very dopey Deda badge on the seat tube that I was afraid to remove (see, paint), but finally did. Vast improvement. The steel also is quite thin, and you need to decide whether you can live with its fragility. I dropped a little plastic tape measure on the top tube, and it''s barely visible, but there is a little ding.

Darn good all around bike. Stiff, but not too. What I first noticed was how the bike tracks through anything. Hit a rough patch on a turn? Not a problem. The rear stays right there. The steel provides more road feel than my Litespeed but still somehow demolishes uneven surfaces. You can carve turns like on skis -- very precise handling. Very responsive. The bike gives back whatever you give it. I don''t have a ton of experience with high end bikes, let alone high-end steel bikes, but I like my bike

Similar Products Used:

Litespeed Natchez

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