Time Challenge Pedals

DESCRIPTION

  • 13 mm. bio-position.
  • Aluminum body and steel axle.

  • USER REVIEWS

    Showing 1-6 of 6  
    [May 29, 2002]
    Sim
    Recreational Rider

    OVERALL
    RATING
    5
    VALUE
    RATING
    5
    Strength:

    if you have a large foot you can place shoes faraway from crank arms, comparing with other brands. large platform. no need of adjustment. they really are "plug and play".

    Weakness:

    a bit heavy. not so easy to step in as Look.

    you don't need to try Time pedals to feel their quality. just put your shoes with cleats to feel the difference. the contact surface between pedal and shoe is enormous, as it should be. these pedals give me the sensation of being connected. not a rider and is bike, but just one piece. you will forget other brands after using them.

    Similar Products Used:

    Look

    [Oct 31, 2001]
    Damitletsride
    Road Racer

    OVERALL
    RATING
    5
    VALUE
    RATING
    5
    Strength:

    Great power transfer, easy to clip in and out, nice tight float and good cornering clearance. (cuttaway sides) so you cant blame the pedels if you hit the ground.

    Weakness:

    a bit heavy compared to the time magnesium, but its not to noticeable.

    A HUUUGE!!UPGRADE from standard spd`s. Power transfer is quick, efficiant, and alot more noticeable. Any other time user will know what i mean. When honking up a hill or along a flat you notice all your power going to the crak arm. I guess because they are metal and not plastic like looks.

    Similar Products Used:

    spd`s.

    [Aug 05, 2000]
    Fiona Munro
    Triathlete

    OVERALL
    RATING
    5
    VALUE
    RATING
    4
    Strength:

    Pivot on the ball of your foot as a result they are easier on the knees. Very hard to pull out accidently.

    Weakness:

    Limited to what shoes you can get. Although Vitoria have just brought out some. Very stiff when first purchased.

    Wouldn't go for anything else. They can be a bit elitest as far as compatable shoes but that seems to be changing. Having said that the Time shoes are a lot more comfortable than most brands.

    Similar Products Used:

    Look

    [Aug 28, 2000]
    GC

    OVERALL
    RATING
    5
    VALUE
    RATING
    5
    Strength:

    Lateral Float.
    Won't accidentally clip out.
    Strong brass cleats.
    No cleat adjustments needed.
    Match perfectly with Time shoes.
    Release either side.

    Weakness:

    A bit heavy compared to some others.
    $$$'s in Australia (but you get what you pay for).
    Paint will wear off in time with the brass cleats.

    These pedals are the *best*, wouldn't use anything else.
    Your foot is as close to the axel as can be (when used with Time shoes - I use the Elite Profil's). There is no chance of accidental release on the upstroke. The lateral float saves your knees. Time is VERY expensive in Australia but worth every cent! Unless weight is a real concern go for the Challenge Pro's, the Criterium Pro's are identical but without paint and the Time Equipe Pro Ti's are just too expensive for most ($500+ AUD).

    Recommend these to anyone who values their knees, from
    recreational riders to pro's.

    See http://www.timesportusa.com/ for more details.

    Similar Products Used:

    SPD, Look

    [Mar 19, 2001]
    Sean Chapman
    Recreational Rider

    OVERALL
    RATING
    5
    VALUE
    RATING
    4
    Strength:

    Float - I've used Time ATAC Alium's on my MTB for 2 years and loved them.
    A good range of shoes in the UK that will work.

    Weakness:

    Unless you use Time pedals you'll need an adapter which increases the distance between your foot and the pedal.
    The paint chips off very easily with the large brass cleat.

    These pedals are great, esspecially for those who have had knee trouble from other brands (I'm in that group). They are quite expensive, but what price can you put on your knees? Once you get used to them, entry and exit is simple - you don't even think about it after a while.

    They look good (until all the paint chips off them).

    So far I haven't changed the cleats, so I don't know how easy they are to come by.

    Similar Products Used:

    Time ATAC Alium (MTB)
    Unbranded SPD (Road)

    [Jun 04, 2001]
    Russell Seaton
    Recreational Rider

    OVERALL
    RATING
    4
    VALUE
    RATING
    4
    Strength:

    Floatation, impossible to accidentally relaease, durable.

    Weakness:

    Difficult to clip into, weight, bad cornering clearance.

    I bought my low end Time pedals from Performance for $80 back in spring 1992. Been using them for road riding ever since. At that time there were very few other clipless pedals offering floatation for the knees. Look had not invented their red ARC cleat yet. Prior to 1992 I had used clips and straps. Feet went numb from having the straps too tight. I had used Look black cleats in the late 80s. My right knee could not tolerate not having floatation so the Look pedals were given to my brother.

    In 1992 I was doing a solo tour of Erope on my new Trek 520 and needed some pedals with floatation. I bought the Time Sport pedals from Performance for $80. Used the thick adaptor on my Duegi shoes. Worked well enough over 4,000 miles that summer and many thousands of miles in later years. No knee problems. The adaptor would move if the screws were not tight enough but other than that, no problems using the adaptor. The Bio-Position was of course another 1/2" higher but I never noticed any problems with this.

    Many years later I bought some superb Carnac shoes which take the Time pedals more or less directly. Sidi, Carnac, Time(made by Carnac), and maybe one or two others take Time pedals more or less directly. I suggest using these shoes if you use Time road pedals. With these shoes you have no adjustment of the cleats other than straight ahead or back. You cannot twist the cleats side to side to better accomodate your natural knee crookedness. The adaptor plate does allow this so you are not constantly fighting the pedal spring. Other cleats, SPD and Look, allow you to adjust the cleat on the shoe bottom to better fit your natural knee angles. Something to consider if your natural angle is very crooked.

    Time pedals are very difficult to get into. I've used them for 9 years and they still require plenty of force and concentration to snap into every single time. Not the pedal for city riding. But once you are in, you do not come out until you want to come out. This is better than the pedals which allow your feet to slip out when you decide to sprint or put some pressure to the pedals. I've heard too many stories of other pedals releasing unintentionally to ever trust them.

    I do use other pedals. I use the SPD 747 for the mountain bike and winter riding and touring. Its nice to be able to walk when you get off the bike. Especially on tours. Its also nice to be able to yank your foot out of the SPD pedals when the emergency requires it. Can't do that with Time pedals. Time pedals and cleats are difficult to walk in. Maybe the worst walking cleats made today.

    My old pedals are still gong after 9 years and zero maintenance. The aluminum body is being worn away by the rear brass cleat when I clip in and out. I figure anotehr 10 years before the brass cleat wears the pedal side completely away. 19-20 years for one set of pedals seems durable enough to me. If you like to have the newest and prettiest and flashiest high tech new wonder in biking gear, do not buy Time pedals. They do not wear out.

    The rear brass cleat never wears out. I finally replaced my original rear brass cleat when I was informed Time had come out with a new model that was considerably easier to enter the pedal. The new style has both sides of the brass cleat clipped. The old one only had one side clipped. The old style was extra difficult to get into. The new style is difficult enough. The front plastic cleat Time is shipping now wears out pretty quickly. The older aluminum front cleat wears for 5 years or so. You can still find the aluminum front cleat if you look.

    The pedal body is large. Lots of surface area to press against. Never had a hot spot when using Time pedals. Unlike the SPD pedals. But then I only use high quality stiff road shoes with the Time and used some cheap flexible Specialized with the SPD pedals.

    The pedals are heavy. Gram counters will not like them. Personally, I've never noticed whether I was riding heavy or light pedals or shoes. I also don't notice my speed go up or down if my water bottle is empty or full. I don't pay much attention to weight when it comes to pedals, shoes, saddles(Brooks only) or handlebars. Where I contact the bike, comfort is the only consideration.

    The difficulty in entry is about the only real negative I can say about the Time pedals. Because of this, they are not for everyone. Inexperienced, old, fragile, and/or unconfident bikers should not use Time pedals due to the force required for entry. They are a racing pedal. Be aware of what you are using.

    Similar Products Used:

    Shimano SPD 747, Look, toeclips and Alfreda Binda Extra straps.

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