Jamis Coda Comp Hybrid Bike

DESCRIPTION

  • FRAME: Reynolds 520 double-butted chromoly main tubes, reinforced head tube collars, double tapered cromo stays, forged dropouts with eyelets.
  • FORK: Carbon fiber unicrown with cromo steerer, forged dropouts.
  • WHEELSET: Shimano WH-R500 wheelset, 700c, 20/24H with 24mm profile rims, radially laced front, 3x rear.
  • TIRES: Hutchinson Flash, 700 x 28C, blackwall.
  • DERAILLEURS: Shimano Deore XT rear, Shimano R443-A bottom pull front.
  • SHIFTERS: Shimano SL-R440 for flat-bar, 27-speed.
  • WEIGHT: 25.00 lbs

  • USER REVIEWS

    Showing 1-10 of 13  
    [Nov 06, 2016]
    Michael Lubeck

    OVERALL
    RATING
    5
    VALUE
    RATING
    5
    Strength:

    After many many months of research, I finally bought the 2017 Coda Comp. I am so happy with this purchase! I didn't even really want a bike right now or need a bike. But now that I have the bike, I couldn't be much happier! First of all, it is beautiful to look at! It has a steel body, which I need because I CRASH A LOT! I can't use a bike that has hollow feeling carbon parts only to snap the frame when I get into one of my many accidents with the bike. `
    Anyways, one thing I love about my Coda Comp is all the eye catching colors on the bike in different areas of the bike. The bike has every color under the sun on it except for white and purple. It is very very fast off the line. The shifting is smooth and excellent! The ride is amazingly smooth and FUN and fast! This is an EXCELLENT bike. Take it from someone who didn't even care about getting a bike and was more or less forced to get a bike by someone but now who is IN LOVE with his CODA COMP!!!!!!

    Weakness:

    Only two weaknesses that have since been dealt with. The first one is the seat. The seat looks totally awesome and aero dynamic and is a quality seat. With that being said, it is too narrow and small for me to ride on it for more than 10-15 blocks without my butt being in pain. I took it to my local LBS who set me up with a new specialized MUCH BETTER seat that will keep my butt more comfortable for longer rides. After all, even if the bike is great, if the seat hurts too much to ride on it, then the bike is useless to you until you get a comfortable seat. Seat problem solved for about $50. Also, the LBS at Mike's Bikes in Sacramento (go see em - majorly huge selection) set me up with a seriously sexy light set that emits 650 Lumens. The bright white light also emits a yellow foglight on the side of it so that cars coming at you from your side can see you, not just people in front of you...man the light set looks sexy! but I digress!

    The second weakness is the pedals. This may very well not be an issue for many people. I'm just a wimp. The thing is, I like smooth pedals because the pedals usually gouge my ankles while im walking a bike, creating painful puncture bloody wounds. This "negative reinforcer" of pain and blood really takes away from my enjoyment when riding a bike. The thing is, the Coda Comp comes with spikey steel or metal pedals. They look really sporty and cool but man I don't like to be in pain and bleeding. I bought a pair of smooth pedals for under $12 and problem solved!

    This is the best bike I have ever owned! I am so excited about owning this bike! Get it! you will NOT be unhappy at all!

    [Nov 19, 2013]
    Balazs Gyenge

    OVERALL
    RATING
    5
    VALUE
    RATING
    5
    Strength:

    Great steal, great components, great geometric SUPERB ride !

    Weakness:

    Non.

    An absolute "joy ride". I have a 2007 model. I'm a part time bicycle mechanic, who loves quality biking !
    To keep this review short......I have been owned and built a lot of Italian-other road, and mountain bikes in the past 8 years. No need mentioning, that 95 % of them was steel framed models with top components.
    I do respect aluminum for a lots of use in life, but biking is certainly not one of these uses ! Yes, there has been so many years of experimenting the nature of aluminum, and there are decent ones out there, but I have to say, that life is just to short to waist it on an aluminum framed bike.
    People bragging about wait and such..........We do not reviewing a suitcase or sunglasses, in which case the weight would be a serious deal breaker.
    I do consider the Jamis Coda Comp a light bike, for what it is made for. The 520 steel frame rides like a dream, super comfortable, and strong. Carbon fork just tops the cake. The wheels are the only thing, that would not worth to dream about, but they decent for starting out with. The frame is the heart of any bike, and the components, seat, brakes, shifters etc....is always changeable, to pretty much anything available. But as a package the Jamis Cona Comp ( 2007 ) is superb.
    I would recommend this bike to anyone who's looking for joy biking in the neighborhood, or even a couple of days of light touring.
    The coda is my most favorable riding bike in the hybrid category, and beyond !

    Best, Balazs

    [Oct 20, 2013]
    SW
    Recreational Rider

    OVERALL
    RATING
    5
    VALUE
    RATING
    5
    Strength:

    Fit and Feel in terms of geometry and road riding experience (even on asphalt roads that are not in great shape), shifting, cost, tires, quickness and agility, surprisingly comfortable seat, great looking bike with silver paint.

    Weakness:

    Wish the handlebar stem could be raised even a half inch but not possible. Weight is OK but a few pounds lighter would have been better (for me). Nevertheless I am very much enjoying this bike.


    Very nice bike (2013) at a great price.

    Similar Products Used:

    Tried Trek 7.5X and found it to be a bit more agile, a bit quicker and lighter but also very "jittery" in terms of how road feel was communicated through the frame to my hands, arms, and body. Not for me. Geometry felt like an odd fit to me too, and I didn't like the flat black color. Also was much more expensive.

    [Oct 10, 2010]
    Del
    Recreational Rider

    OVERALL
    RATING
    5
    VALUE
    RATING
    5
    Strength:

    Steel soaks up road vibration and weight is not a factor. Great value for the price. Nice upright riding position that adds to the comfort.

    Weakness:

    Seat is not comfortable and changed handgrips to more ergonomic style.

    I have the Coda Elite which has the same frame as the Comp, but with upgraded components. I've been riding a Cannondale Synapse Sport for the past 3 years but wanted a more upright bike with flat bars. My friend swore by steel frame bikes and after testing Specialize, Trek, and Giant aluminum frame flat bars I decided to give Jamis a try. First off I was impressed with the workmanship and paint scheme and lettering of the Coda and the quality of components for the price. This is actually a 2009 model in metallic gold paint. Second, I was blown away with the ride feel of the bike. The steel frame really soaked up the road vibrations and had a solid feel that the aluminum bikes could not equal. I was sold and bought it on the spot.

    Similar Products Used:

    Specialized Sirrus, Cannondale Synapse Sport, Trek FX, Giant hybrid

    [Jul 10, 2010]
    ask
    Recreational Rider

    OVERALL
    RATING
    5
    VALUE
    RATING
    5

    2010 Jamis Coda Comp. OTD for $625.

    Good price???

    [May 04, 2010]
    dsw1204
    Commuter

    OVERALL
    RATING
    5
    VALUE
    RATING
    5
    Strength:

    Steel, steel, steel!!! The component group that comes stock is unparalleled by it's competition.

    Weakness:

    Absolutely none.

    I just absolutely love this bike. I looked at the Cannondale Bad Boy (which I liked a lot), Specialized Sirrus, Trek 7.5FX, and the Giant FCR2. All these bikes are great bikes, but when you look at what you get, the Jamis Coda Comp totally outshines these other bikes. The bikes comes with XT derailleur (second from the top-of-the line XTR), SL-660 shifters (second from the top-of-the line SL-770), Avid SD-5 brakes with SD-5 levers, and not to mention the Reynolds 520 steel frame. This bike is considerably faster the the Bad Boy and as fast as the others I looked at. It will climb hills as well as the Bad Boy and much better that the Sirrus, FCR2, and the 7.5FX (street hills, that is). I am a commuter and will ride paved trails when I can get the time. This bike excels in those arenas. The steel frame takes the buzz out of the road and makes the ride extremely comfortable. The gearing makes it easy to climb the most difficult hills and also allows you to tear up the road on straight-aways and down hills. I can't say enough great things about this bike!

    Similar Products Used:

    I haven't owned any other decent bike, but did test ride the Bad Boy, Sirrus, FCR2, and the FX7.5.

    [Jan 18, 2010]
    buttmunch
    Recreational Rider

    OVERALL
    RATING
    5
    VALUE
    RATING
    5
    Strength:

    Beautiful steel frame - very nice ride even on rough city streets. Fast, agile, and comfortable. Good, confident braking.

    Weakness:

    My friends say it is heavier than my old road bike (not noticeable to me). Brakes are hard to release when removing the front wheel.

    Wow, I love this bike! I use it for commuting and for weekend fitness rides. Traded in my Bianchi road bike because of neck and back pain. I can ride the Jamis comfortably for hours, unlike my other bikes. This has become the favorite bike in the house. I rode most of the competing "hybrid" flat bar road bikes - the Jamis was love at first ride for me. Highly recommended.

    Similar Products Used:

    Sirius, Bianchi, Trek hybrid (forgot the name)

    [Jun 28, 2009]
    Anonymous
    Recreational Rider

    OVERALL
    RATING
    4
    VALUE
    RATING
    5
    Strength:

    Steel, steel, steel. (The carbon fiber fork and suspension seatpost also don't hurt....)

    Perfect first road bike for the ex-MTBer.

    Tried-and-true MTB components won't leave you stranded in the urban grind.

    Sub-$900 price won't break the bank yet buys you enough bike for years of enjoyment.

    Weakness:

    Weight--heavy for a "true" road bike. Fancier components would lighten (and price-n) it up.

    I bought my 2008 Coda Comp (there was no pulldown for '08) after I decided my 15 year-old mountain bike was not best suited for on-pavement recreational/fitness riding (well, duh)....

    As a casual rider who only rode MTBs, the upright posture and flat bars of the Coda cut down on the intimidation factor. Other MTB-esque features like rapid-fire shifters, Shimano LX gruppo, etc. also smoothed the transition.

    I cross-shopped the Trek FX, Specialized Cirrus, and Cannondale Bad Boy (had a discount on those brands thanks to a friend who worked at another LBS). I also had half an eye out for one of the boutique brands that seem so popular on bay area streets--I ultimately decided that my riding level hardly justified a $2000+ bicycle.

    The single biggest difference between the Jamis and the aforementioned contenders is the Coda's Reynolds 520 steel frame. The old-timers had already told me that "steel is real," but I didn't fully realize it until I took the Coda on a bombed-out and depleted (i.e., typical) Oakland street. Put simply, the steel frame takes the edge off. Small road imperfections and large potholes alike are soaked up by the steel. The difference is immediately noticeable; over the long haul, the relative cushiness of steel makes up for any weight difference compared to the aluminum competition (my 21.5" Coda Comp weighs almost exactly 25 pounds "empty").

    The benefits of the steel frame were so striking that I'm surprised Jamis doesn't promote it more--perhaps they're worried about steel's old-fashioned image? Frame material is something the casual buyer can easily overlook, especially in this price/market segment, but my experience has been that frame material alone can be a MAJOR determining factor...enough for me to skip my Trek/Specialized/Cannondale discount and pay full price for the Coda.

    The included components are a nice, rugged compliment to the frame, and if my knee weren't so sketchy, I'd ride this sucker across the country.

    Similar Products Used:

    Nothing, really. Only other bike is a '94 Trek 7000 MTB. Which, not surprisingly, is HELLA slower than the Coda on the street.

    [Jan 21, 2009]
    oldbalddude
    Commuter

    OVERALL
    RATING
    4
    VALUE
    RATING
    4
    Strength:

    Price! Comfortable seat (upgrade), suspension seatpost, solid frame, decent carbon fork (Kinesis), good wheelset, solid component mix, smooth shifting. Came with PLanet Bike fenders and a rack too!

    Weakness:

    Frame is a little small, the bike looked like it had sat out in the sun for a while. :(

    It's like a road bike on steroids! The frame is a little small for me, but I put a longer stem on it and she's good to go. I figure I can find a bigger frame on CL or at the semi-annual bike swap meet. That said, the steel frame is solid and I was impressed with how the carbon fork (my first) handles the bumps in the road. Very nimble and agile, I love this bike.

    Similar Products Used:

    First hybrid, but have ridden road & touring bikes.

    [Aug 28, 2008]
    Tim Horn yak
    Commuter

    OVERALL
    RATING
    5
    VALUE
    RATING
    5
    Strength:

    Quiet, smooth shifting, deceptively fast and absorbs almost every vibration from the road.

    Weakness:

    The paint marks up easily. That's about all I can complain about.

    I purchased the 2007 Coda Comp mostly because of all the great reviews and the great deal I was getting. After the first ride it was like night and day from my aluminum framed bike. You barely know your traveling over the road because it's so smooth. I can hardly wait to use it on the century this weekend.

    Similar Products Used:

    2006 Schwinn Super Sport aluminum with carbon fork and seat post. Daily commuter use. (and it's harsh compared to the Coda)

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