SKS Raceblade Long fenders review

Easy-to-install mud guards keep body and bike debris free

Parts
The brackets are held in place by your wheel's QR. To remove the fender simply snap them off and leave the bracket in place.

The brackets are held in place by your wheel’s QR. To remove the fender simply snap them off and leave the bracket in place (click to enlarge).

Out on the road, the SKS Raceblade Long fenders worked flawlessly, save for a bit of rattle from the front wheel’s forward fender. It’s short and only secured at one end, and has a tendency to bounce around some. I needed to bend the bracket upwards a little so it wouldn’t hit the tire every time I hit a crack or pothole. There’s also a small fender gap around the brake calipers, so you still may end up with some grime accumulation there.

The front fender had a tendency to rattle until the bracket was sufficiently bent upwards.

The front fender had a tendency to rattle until the bracket was sufficiently bent upwards (click to enlarge).

If you don’t want to use the fenders on a particular ride, you can easily pop them off, but leave the brackets in place for next time. The brackets are a little unsightly, but I for one would rather save the time if I knew the fenders would be going back on soon.

SKS says that max tire size is 25mm, but my Parlee Z5 SL with 26mm Specialized Turbo tires fit no problem, and honestly, I think you might be able to push to a 28mm tire. Bottom line, for anyone who rides in the rain and wet, the SKS Raceblade Long fenders are a great protective solution that can easily be taken off when not needed. Mount up a pair and your bike, body — and riding buddies — will thank you.

For more info please visit https://www.sks-germany.com.

About the author: Jason Sumner

An avid cyclist, Jason Sumner has been writing about two-wheeled pursuits of all kinds since 1999. He’s covered the Tour de France, the Olympic Games, and dozens of other international cycling events. He also likes to throw himself into the fray, penning first-person accounts of cycling adventures all over the globe. Sumner, who joined the RoadBikeReview.com / Mtbr.com staff in 2013, has also done extensive gear testing and is the author of the cycling guide book "75 Classic Rides: Colorado." When not writing or riding, the native Coloradoan can be found enjoying time with his wife Lisa and daughter Cora.


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  • Kenny says:

    Unfortunately sometimes things break but the real test is in how the company handled the issue. Did you contact them??

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