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I just installed a new '06 Centaur BB on my Bianchi (68mm BB shell, 111mm spindle, English) to replace a Veloce AC-S. Even out of the box I noticed that the Centaur spindle had much more rotating resistance than the AC-S (which has about 2000mi on it). For example I could spin the bare AC-S spindle with my fingers and it would go for several rotations, whereas the Centaur would barely do one.

But of more concern is that the resistance of the Centaur spindle goes way up after I tighten the non-drive-side cup to the 70 n*m/50 ft*lb torque spec. As per the instructions I backed off the torque to around 30 ft*lb and secured the threads with blue loctite, but even at this level the spindle is significantly tighter than before. I finally settled at around 10 ft*lb which was a sort of uneasy compromise between tightness of the cup and tightness of the spindle.

So my question is, is this normal? I haven't ridden the bike yet, and I don't want to damage the BB bearings, so I wouldn't mind backing off the torque of the non-drive side cup even more. Could there be something wrong with my BB shell or the BB itself? Is it safe to ride the bike with such low torque on the non-drive side?
 

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You have to use loctite on both cup threads and reduce the tightening torque to no more than 10Nm on both sides. Wait a couple of days to let the glue become hard before riding the bike.
The bearings are full of grease, they require some brake in, I had the same problem with the Chorus ones.
 
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