Road Bike, Cycling Forums banner

1 - 4 of 4 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi All
First off, I am new here so hello everyone.
I am currently looking to buy a tri bike and found 2 but can't make up my mind on which one to get!!

First bike: 06 Trek equinox 7 with
- Dura Ace upgrade,
- Zipp 404 wheels,
- carbon crank and ceramic bearings,
- T2+ cobra profile aerobars and
- tons of extra (bike trainer, old components from the original bike)
- Price: $1800

Second bike: 09 Trek Equinox TTX 9.0
- Bike is pretty much stock, no upgrades
- Price: $1500

$1800 is a bit more than I wanted, $1500 is more my price range but I feel like I'll get more for my money with the Equinox 7. The frame isn't carbon and is a little older but the bike is nicely upgraded.
Oh and I plan on doing HIM and Olympic tris with this bike.

Any thoughts?

Thanks a lot!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,263 Posts
While the 404's sound nice with the Equinox 7, I'd personally opt for what is presumably the fresher and nicer frame of the Equinox TTX 9.0.

On top of that, used wheels can be iffy imo. So just knowing that the 404's act as a selling point, it's an iffy selling point in my view, and as many say "there's better wheels for the money".
 

·
trying to HTFU...
Joined
·
1,875 Posts
while price is certainly important, getting fit properly is the _most_ important. any poorly fit bike no matter how great a deal will suck.

goto slowtwitch.com and learn a bit about tri-bike fit:

http://www.slowtwitch.com/Bike_Fit/index.html

is _the_ place to start. tri bikes 'generally' have a steep seat tube angle(STA) to allow you to mimic your regular road bike fit, just rotated forward around the bottom bracket(BB). they will also have a longer 'front-center' which will be designed to compensate for the increased forward weight bias. you will also see that the head-tube angle is a bit more slack than regular road bikes. this forward position allows you to get a more aerodynamic position without excessively compromising your run(on a slack STA bike, you over-extend the hamstrings) and reducing your breathing room by forcing your thighs to be very close to your chest(this is also referred to as the 'dead-spot' at the top of the pedal stroke.)

another note: there will be two(2) different styles of geometry, ITU and 'regular'. ITU refers to the International Triathlon Union which is the governing body for Olympic distance triathlons. they have stipulated certain things about the geometry of the bike which is at odds with 'regular' triathlons, namely, position of the seat(and hence STA), length of the clip-ons and drafting(allowed). ITU tri bikes are more like regular road bikes, and in fact many ITU athletes use regular road bikes with mini-clip-ons. i don't have the ITU rules bookmarked so you'll have to google them. that said, you'll have to decide how those rules will affect your buying decision. if i recall correctly, both Equinox bikes have geos that are ITU acceptable, Trek's most recent bike is a 'real' tri bike with the steep STA.

learn a bit more about fit first before committing to a bike that might not fit or be good for you.

good luck!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Hi CWG.
Thanks for the lengthy reply. I have been reading quite a bit about tri bikes and the associated fittings. I recently used this article to measure critical angles that may be a limiting factor: http://www.endurancecorner.com/Alan_Couzens/anatomical_bike_fitting

Based on my research from other websites, it looks like the trek equinox frame is a good fit for my riding style and for the use I want to make of the bike.

Thanks also for the note about the used wheels. Even though it looks like the bike was very well taken care of, I didn't think about the fact it could have received abuse over the years.

Thanks again for the feedback.
 
1 - 4 of 4 Posts
Top