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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm thinking about buying a new crank. My 86 sugino has over 50,000 miles and the rings are fairly worn (I haven't had any problems, but new rings will obviously improve performance). I saw a good deal for a new Campy veloce 10 speed for $60. Does anyone see any problems?

shifters suntour downtube cylone friction
chain: whatever is cheap, sedis or low end shimano designed for only 7 speed
front derailler: suntour superbe pro (1986)
rear derailler: mavic 851 with superbe pro pulleys(sealed bearing)

thanks
 

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Lizzie will ride free
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Friction_Shifter said:
I'm thinking about buying a new crank. My 86 sugino has over 50,000 miles and the rings are fairly worn (I haven't had any problems, but new rings will obviously improve performance). I saw a good deal for a new Campy veloce 10 speed for $60. Does anyone see any problems?

shifters suntour downtube cylone friction
chain: whatever is cheap, sedis or low end shimano designed for only 7 speed
front derailler: suntour superbe pro (1986)
rear derailler: mavic 851 with superbe pro pulleys(sealed bearing)

thanks
Sedis isn't around anymore. I believe they are part of SRAM now, and pretty much everyone has good luck with SRAM chains and the connect link they use. They make a chain for 6,7,8 speed that will work fine. Match the chain to the cassette -- or in this case the freewheel. I had no problems using newer cranks with 7 speed systems, but you should get more input from others. The new ramps and pins are truly an improvement. You don't need them, of course, but people do shifts under pressure today that would have hurt in the past. I still back off out of habit. You'll also want to spend some time reading Sheldon Brown's material at Harris Cycle...just google his name. He'll have all the answers to most of your questions. Some people like the higher level campy cranks record, chorus, and centaur because of better luck with the brackets of chorus or record. Supposedly the new centaur is better than the old. Fantastic new or slightly used alloy campy cranks can be had for not much money because carbon is the rage in the high end. The higher end campy cranks use a different tool for the bracket. Check out Froogle to point you to good deals.

Oh lastly, the book Zinn and the Art of Road Bike Maintenance will fill the gap for you between 88 and now. Or you can look at the Park tool site for free.

Another thought since you were on the subject of wheels before...are you sure you want to go at this a piece at a time? Perhaps you want a new bike and keep this as the spare? Just depends what you're tryin' to do?
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I just bought a 90 Cannondale 3.0 racing frame. I'm upgrading parts on my 85 cannondale and taking those parts and building the 3.0 with them (along with some spare parts I have saved). I know this probably seems backwords to many but I really like the rigidity and ride of the older dale, it is a really fast efficient frame and I never felt like it beat me up. I also have an 86 Ciocc with columbus SL tubing and I prefer the ride of the dale over that. Any opinions on the Veloce 10 speed crankset? It looks nice, and is light. The rings are stamped though (rathed than machined).
 

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Cool.

Veloce cranks would look pretty good on a retro rig, but yeah, you could get something higher end slightly used.

Brother Grant (Rivendell) makes it a point to say, you can mix and match different brands of drivetrain components with 6-7 speed friction shifters. The rear derailleur cage just has to be long enough to take up the chain slack. Presumably, that won't change.

The problems might be, 1)mating the cranks to the existing bb tapers, and 2)getting the rings within the range of spread of the front derailleur, which would be a function of how far in the crank sits on the bb spindle. Worst case could be an upgrade to a Centaur compatible bb, which might up the cost, possibly enough to make finding replacement chainrings for the Sugino crank a more attractive option.

Performanc Bikes has sales on their Sedis, er, Sram PC-58 chains about every month. That's the one that works from 5 to 8 speeds, has nickle plated side plates, is strong enough for mountainbikers, and costs around $15.00 on sale, the same price as Sram's low end PC-48 without the nickle strengthened side plates. I keep replacing mine every 2000 or so miles and have never worn one out. The cheap Shimano chains are crap by comparison.
 

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Two name changes behind

jplatzner said:
Sedis isn't around anymore. I believe they are part of SRAM now, ...
Sedis is part of SRAM now, but that was two company buy-outs ago. Sedis was bought by Sachs, and the chains were renamed Sachs-Sedis for a year or two, and then just called Sachs after that. In a similar vain, When Sachs bought hub and freewheel maker Maillard, their freehwheels were labeled Sachs-Maillard for a year or two, and then just Sachs, and when Sachs bought derailleur manufacturer Huret, the derailleurs were labeled Sachs-Huret before becoming just Sachs.

When SRAM bought the Sachs bicycle division, all their components (chains, hubs, freewheels, cassettes, derailleurs) were immediately renamed SRAM. However, when SRAM bought Truvativ (cranks, bottom brackets and stems), RockShox (forks and rear shocks) and Avid (brakes), they kept the original brand names.
 
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