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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I would like some comments from anyone who has had a chance to truly compare the overall performance of NEW Dura Ace 10 with that of Campy Record 10. I don't want this to degenerate into a Campy v. Shimano mudfest. Enough of that crap has already been flooding bandwidth for years, and the debates usually become so ridiculous--ultimately filled with rhetoric that is usually reserved to discussions about religion, politics and the Mideast.

I have been racing with Shimano DA for the better part of a decade after initial experience with Campy (circa. Synchros index shifting). This year, we may get some help getting Campy Record 10 gruppos.

As a bike racer (cat 2, 145 lbs, 5'9") I am pretty pragmatic about my equipment. Sure there is a certain personal affinity for a frame or a grouppo, but what I want info on is PERFORMANCE. Try to keep it in the context of racing performance. Also please leave aesthetics, tradition, Tullio's frozen finger revelation, and Biopace on the sidelines.

I want information, regardless of how subjective, from good folks who have ridden both and have an opinion. THANKS.
 

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Not to sound like a prick but if you're picky about your gear then ride them for yourself and get your own opinion, I did.

Seriously, if you've raced long enough then you will know what feels best to yourself and to your style of racing. These are the top of the line groups for both companies and neither one is a real slouch. So do you really expect to see a huge difference between the two other than the traditional differences with these companies.

Again, don't mean to sound rude but there's my two cents.
 

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I'll compare Dura Ace 10 speed to 9-speed and can hopefully offer some insight. I've been on Dura Ace 9 for 2 years and DA10 for 1 month.

Dura Ace 10 is significantly better. The extra gear has no advantage for me yet? It's a lot of gears back there for 12-23. I think for a rider like myself a wider gear range will help me appreciate 10-speed. Here's the pluses in order of importance.

Crank/BB stiffness - DA10 is noticeably stiffer. If you bounce on the pedals on the level position, it doesn't flex. On the ride, I notice a little more go every time I accelerate. Standing up climbing on the big ring there's no chainring rub as well. I'm 140 lbs and I notice a difference. Sprinters and clydesdales should appreciate this even more.

Shifters - The new shifters are a piece of work. They are sooo smooth. The action is very deliberate and satisfying. I know, it's only shifting but firing the black lever has amazing push-button feel. The hoods are better too. More room and a higher front stop.

Brakes - 10 to 20% more power. I now have more power braking from the hoods and I switched to 1 finger braking on the drops and felt great on a long, steep and twisty descent.
 

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Ultimately, there really is no performance difference. I've never heard a racer say that his performance was determined by having Campy or Shimano.

It comes down to aesthetics, rhetoric, tradition and a whole lot of subjective opinion. In the end you're going to have to figure out for yourself that you like Campy better.
 

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Silly Request...

The pros and cons of the campy ergo levers compared to shimano sti have been discussed a hundred times. Other than those obvious differences, both can be expected to perform flawlessly.

Campy offers lower level groups that are much better values (Chorus) if a couple ounces of weight is not a big concern.
 

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There is no difference (at least not the kind you want to hear about).

I've ridden and raced '03 Record, '04 DA and '03 DA on identical frames and wheels. As far as perfomance from a completely objective standpoint (if there is such a thing), there is little to no difference. The derailleurs shift the chain from cog to cog; the brakes stop the bike. I perceive (sorry but there's no there other way to put it) that the '04 DA brakes are initially smoother and will stop in you in a bit shorter distance. Otherwise, the machinery works pretty much the same. What makes the two groups different (aside from weight) is all subjective, and that's what you don't want to hear. Kinda dull, huh? But what did you expect?
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thanks for the input...kinda what I would think.

I figured that at this level it's pretty much sixes. I just needed to know about overall experiences, particularly the bad ones. By the way, any wierd idiosyncrosies with the campy stuff, especially during building?

Thanks again.


QUOTE=MerckxMad]I've ridden and raced '03 Record, '04 DA and '03 DA on identical frames and wheels. As far as perfomance from a completely objective standpoint (if there is such a thing), there is little to no difference. The derailleurs shift the chain from cog to cog; the brakes stop the bike. I perceive (sorry but there's no there other way to put it) that the '04 DA brakes are initially smoother and will stop in you in a bit shorter distance. Otherwise, the machinery works pretty much the same. What makes the two groups different (aside from weight) is all subjective, and that's what you don't want to hear. Kinda dull, huh? But what did you expect?[/QUOTE]
 

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I like how my Chorus 10 shifts in the rear better than Shimano.
I like the reach to the levers while in the drops better with Shimano's new stuff.
Crank stiffness... the DA is supposed to be worlds stiffer but I love my Record crank/"old" technology bb. It just feels like a rocket.
Brakes: Shimano all the way, although road bikes are supposed to modulate, not stop.
I also like how Shimano shifts in the front.

While my favorite bike has 10sp Campy, my next bike will have 10sp Shimano for no reason other than I like the looks of it. There, I said it.
 

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campy is easy to build..

Rouleur said:
I figured that at this level it's pretty much sixes. I just needed to know about overall experiences, particularly the bad ones. By the way, any wierd idiosyncrosies with the campy stuff, especially during building?

Thanks again.

The only thing that's a bit more difficult in building a campy bike is routing the shift cables under the bar tape. You can choose from routing the derailleur cables on the back side of the bars or the front. I prefer the front routing, but the cables must be pushed hard against the ergo lever body to hold them down and fiberglass strapping tape used to hold them in place. If the cables are not taped down tightly they can cause hand discomfort.

Only one special tool is required to assemble a campy bike - the combination cassette lockring/bottom bracket tool.

The Campy HD-L connector pin for the chain can be installed with an ordinary chain tool, but be sure to drape the chain over the BB shell to eliminate any tension of the chain while installing the pin. Better yet, get a wipperman connex link to connect the chain.
 
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