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Ive been mountain biking and road biking for a few years now and Im very seriously considering a cyclocross bike. Basically I will use this on crushed limestone trails in both summer and chicago winter. Also I want it to be a good bike for commuting. Since ill be riding in snow I assume that disc brakes will be a good option. Other than that Im thinking aluminum but steel is cool as well. Basically Im asking for some thoughts on what to buy, also how good are these in snow? Im thinking about a thousand bucks for a budget but I know bikes and ill go higher by a couple hundered if it makes a good difference.
 

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So much out there. A cross bike will do it all, with some minor tweaks. You might look for something used, but $1200 will get you a good bike new as well. I bought a new 2007 Jamis Nova for $900, stripped most of the parts off, sold them for around $350, bought the parts I wanted for about $600, and now have a great bike.....$1150 or so. I would have bought a frameset, but was unable to find one in my size. Check out Soma, Surly and Salsa for steel, can't say for aluminum, not my thing. You've probably got half the parts kicking around the garage, look for a frame and get building!
-Brian
 

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shomyoface said:
Hate to say it, but perhaps a single speed 29'er may be a better choice for your uses......
Huh? Can you elaborate on why you'd say that?

He wants to commute year round and ride "crushed limestone" trails with it, so he doesn't need big mtb tires.. he needs cross tires at best. Commuting year round means fender eyelets, are those common on 29ers? And singlespeed... why?? There's no reason to limit your gearing on a bike that's going to be versatile, the gear you want for pavement will not work so well on trails.
 

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colinr said:
Huh? Can you elaborate on why you'd say that?

He wants to commute year round and ride "crushed limestone" trails with it, so he doesn't need big mtb tires.. he needs cross tires at best. Commuting year round means fender eyelets, are those common on 29ers? And singlespeed... why?? There's no reason to limit your gearing on a bike that's going to be versatile, the gear you want for pavement will not work so well on trails.
More disc ready/equipped options, especially in Al. More of that "versatility" you mention being able to run anything form a road tire to 2.5" MTB tire. There is plenty of reason to limit the number of components you bolt onto a commuter that will be in the elements year round. Lack of eyelets is an easy problem to solve.

Maybe you can elaborate on why a CX bike is a better option. No opinion either way on my part, but you seem pretty keyed up.
 

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PeanutButterBreath said:
More disc ready/equipped options, especially in Al. More of that "versatility" you mention being able to run anything form a road tire to 2.5" MTB tire. There is plenty of reason to limit the number of components you bolt onto a commuter that will be in the elements year round. Lack of eyelets is an easy problem to solve.

Maybe you can elaborate on why a CX bike is a better option. No opinion either way on my part, but you seem pretty keyed up.
Meh. Not really keyed up enough to elaborate much on this one. But come on, the guy says he wants to get a cx bike for commuting and light trail riding, is that not a very common use for them?

He could go to the commuting/touring forums if he wanted to ask "what's the best commuter setup?"

To make this meta-discussion not completely worthless -- I would say that you don't need discs on it. This will drastically limit your frame/hub choices, and I don't think the benefit is worth it. So what if you don't have the greatest braking in the rain? You can stop a bike with cantis in rain and snow just fine as long as you don't take stupid risks.
 

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colinr said:
He could go to the commuting/touring forums if he wanted to ask "what's the best commuter setup?"
A lot of people could do that and should at the very least X-post to that board.

colinr said:
To make this meta-discussion not completely worthless -- I would say that you don't need discs on it. This will drastically limit your frame/hub choices, and I don't think the benefit is worth it. So what if you don't have the greatest braking in the rain? You can stop a bike with cantis in rain and snow just fine as long as you don't take stupid risks.
I agree completely.

These are both discussions that come up weekly. Best "CX" bike for commuting. Best "CX" bike with disc brakes.

I want a car for driving to work and running errands around town year round. Should I get a Mitsubishi EVO or a Subaru WRX? I may or may not compete in the Pikes Peak International Hill Climb. . .
 

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pretender said:
Seems like he already did: tires, gears, fenders, and panniers. I completely agree with Colin. A SS 29er would be ponderously slow on the road, and way overkill for the dirt paths he likes to ride on.
Those are all options that are available on a 29er. Ponderously slow? :rolleyes: You can run the same tire and gearing on both. For the intended use, the only thing you get with a CX bike over a 29er is limitations.
 

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PeanutButterBreath said:
Those are all options that are available on a 29er. Ponderously slow? :rolleyes: You can run the same tire and gearing on both. For the intended use, the only thing you get with a CX bike over a 29er is limitations.
SS 29er was the option on the table. Yes, you can put narrow tires on a 29er. The 29ers I've seen (and the one I own) don't come with rack or fender eyelets.

The only thing a 29er has on a cross bike for the OPs stated use is the wider availability of disc brakes, which you've already conceded aren't necessary.

You accused Colin of being "pretty keyed up"?
 

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pretender said:
SS 29er was the option on the table. Yes, you can put narrow tires on a 29er. The 29ers I've seen (and the one I own) don't come with rack or fender eyelets.

The only thing a 29er has on a cross bike for the OPs stated use is the wider availability of disc brakes, which you've already conceded aren't necessary.

You accused Colin of being "pretty keyed up"?
P-clamps make the eyelet argument moot.

If OP wants disc brakes, I agree with you that that they are more widely available on 29ers.

I also explained why SS is both a viable and possibly preferable option.

Please explain why a 29er, SS or otherwise, would necessarily be ponderously slow on the road. TIA.
 

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PeanutButterBreath said:
P-clamps make the eyelet argument moot.

If OP wants disc brakes, I agree with you that that they are more widely available on 29ers.

I also explained why SS is both a viable and possibly preferable option.

Please explain why a 29er, SS or otherwise, would necessarily be ponderously slow on the road. TIA.
Oi veh.

A 29er isn't necessarily ponderously slow on the road. All you have to do is change out the tires, gears, wheels, fork, and frame. :D
 

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pretender said:
Seems like he already did: tires, gears, fenders, and panniers. I completely agree with Colin. A SS 29er would be ponderously slow on the road, and way overkill for the dirt paths he likes to ride on.
Karate Monkey?

I commute with my SS 29ers to work and they are fine for the "road" when the roads are in the city, curbs, stairs, stop and go...

I am curious as to how well a Karate Monkey would serve as a cross bike since I have never raced a cross race (yet).
 

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marty_hd said:
Karate Monkey?

I commute with my SS 29ers to work and they are fine for the "road" when the roads are in the city, curbs, stairs, stop and go...

I am curious as to how well a Karate Monkey would serve as a cross bike since I have never raced a cross race (yet).
Just like commuting, a wide range of bikes will work fine--although not optimally--for cross racing, depending on what sort of componentry you hang on it. Portaging the bike will be somewhat difficult. The KM frame and fork are about a pound heavier than those of the Cross Check, for example. The triangle isn't as tiny as other 29ers, so shouldering the bike is workable, but not ideal. If you run two-inch knobbies, it will be ponderously slow on pavement sections.
 
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