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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've been mtb'ing for 2 years now and plan to purchase my first road bike, question is which should i get a triple chainring setup or 2 up? Which built bike would you suggest under $1500, the best bang for the buck thanks.......
 

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Bacon!
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Read through the zillion other postings below this as far as price range. You'll get such a large variety of answers it'll only add a whole list of new questions for you. Basically though, buy a bike that is minimally using a Shimano 105 or Campy Centaur drivetrain. Personally, I really like the Ultegra stuff and think it shifts smoother than the 105. I haven't used Campy often enough to provide you with info on the feel and workmanship of it but a lot of people love it. As far as brands. Any of the house brands are good. Specialized, Trek, Felt, Bianchi, Lemond, Giant, etc. etc. are all equal as far as quality IMO. Fit is going to be everything. Ride the bike for a minimal of 30 minutes before you buy it. Longer if they'll allow it. Make sure they take the time to fully set up the bike and measure you to make sure it's going to fit your body.

As far as triple, double, double compact it will depend on what you're going to be riding. Triples are great for the major mountain stuff. They help on those 12% forever climbs. Doubles are can be changed out in the cassette to be made a little easier and lot of people still ride them in the hills but it is going to take a little more effort. I have a double compact and love it. Sort of an inbetween option. I haven't found anything yet that I can't climb with it. It is a little slower on the downhills as I top off the gears (end up spinning like a madman when my friends on doubles are getting a little more out of their gearing).

Anyway, good luck.
 

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Taking a pragmatic view....

The market's so competitive that I don't think there's a huge difference in quality or components among bikes in that price range--they'll all have about the same parts, maybe cutting costs in different places (one company will save a few cents on a headset, another might save a few on a bottom bracket, stuff like that). They'll all shift OK and brake all right (because the major components will be about the same) and not have room for tires bigger than about 25mm.
So what do you do? Make sure whatever catches your eye fits you--don't be lured by a bargain or a flashy paint job into buying something that's not just right. Ask around about service, and try to pick a shop with a good reputation. In general (but not always), I've had better luck with small places than mega-stores, but the number of small independent bike shops is dwindling.
As for double vs. triple, I have triples on everything but my singlespeed now, and I'll never go back--but I'm an old guy living among 8000-foot mountains. Really, though, there aren't any serious disadvantages to a triple, and it gives you a bailout gear when you need it. The three objections to them that people usually mention are appearance (who cares?), weight (what, four ounces? You'll never feel it) and sloppy shifting (doesn't bother me--how can you screw up a front shift, anyway?).
All this is invalid, of course, if one of the bikes is orange. Then you buy the orange one.
 

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papa sboak
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new bike

1. The bike MUST fit you. Read the endless posts about fitting a bike on this forum.

2. Buy a blowout or clearance model that'll save you a good 15%+ or allow you to stay in the same price range and get something better. Be patient, visit at least 7 or 8 LBS, even if they aren't that local. Find a balance between what you want & where you get the best service.

3. Don't buy anything you can't ride. You can't tell fit simply based on the numbers.

4. In all respect to Cory, DO NOT get an orange bike! Get a YELLOW one!

5. Buy a $600 bike on sale for much less (if it fits), change nothing on the bike (except for adjustments, possibly saddle/stem), learn how it works & ride it for at least 2000 mi., THEN decide if you NEED a pricier bike. By then, you'll have a better idea of your needs and wants. If you go all out now (okay, $1500 isn't all out), you might regret not having made that decision later when you know more about road bikes. Then you'll have a really nice beater/commuter or you can sell it for a slight loss & put it toward your "good" bike.
 

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mikey_mike said:
I've been mtb'ing for 2 years now and plan to purchase my first road bike, question is which should i get a triple chainring setup or 2 up? Which built bike would you suggest under $1500, the best bang for the buck thanks.......
I was in the same boat as you. Recreational mtn biker for about year and half, and I have just bought a road bike (just arrived so need to get built up). Before I go into what I have learned, let me give you some background info so that you can compare.

Background:
o I'm a clyde.
o Live in an area that has plenty of very tough climbs. I have hills all around me.
o Tried giving road riding a chance about 10 years ago, but it didn't work out. On a hindsight, I had too big of bike and caused too much bodily discomfort that I couldn't get used to it.
o Been mtn biking, and I'm in better shape then 10 years ago even though I have probably gained 30 lbs since then (probably contradictory, but I'm definitely able to ride longer and climb further than before).
o My price range was about $1000 to $2000. And I was mainly looking for steel frame, but low end ti if I can do it under $2k with triple chainrings.

Here's what I have been able to learn by talking to bicycle shop owners, friends who road ride, surfing the forums, asking and gettting great responses by people on this board.
o Fit is the most important factor for road riding...learned my mistake from my 1st road bike. With mtn bikes, it's not as important as on road bikes as we are always moving around the saddle to adjust to the terrain and we tend to ride less miles.
o Try riding as many bikes as possible and not for 5 minutes around the shop. The longer that you can ride it, will give you better sense of what the bike offers. I realized that numbers didn't mean much. In one shop I was able to check out four different bikes that had similar numbers, but at the end I was able to tell which one felt most right to me.
o I bought a 05 left over and saved quite a bit.
o There are basically 3 choices on the drivetrain/crank:
1. triple
2. double compact
3. double
I wanted a triple, but the bike that I got only comes in double compact. My plan is to give double compact a try and see how that works out. If I feel that I need more gears, then I will switch out to triple. Cost wise, it's not the smartest thing to do, but I was willing to take that chance. I figured instead of getting a great deal, it might just end up being an ok deal.

Hope you do find a bike that is right for you.
 

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Bianchi Axis-- almost a no-brainer

The Bianchi Axis is the best all-around bike I've seen for $1400. Then get new tires for it.

It's a lot of bike for the money.

mikey_mike said:
I've been mtb'ing for 2 years now and plan to purchase my first road bike, question is which should i get a triple chainring setup or 2 up? Which built bike would you suggest under $1500, the best bang for the buck thanks.......
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I'm from the Philippines and there are three manufacturers that are reliable in terms of product support namely GIANT, JAMIS and MERIDA. I'm limiting my choice to these 3 brand names, have lowered my budget to $800 max because i will be just using it for 3hr. weekday road ride for cross training...thanks for all your inputs.
 
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