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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Back in March, my company moved to a new location that is nicer and ritzier than the old. Well, it didn't take long to attract some sleazy attention. Yesterday 2 bikes were stolen in broad daylight (between 5:00 and 6:00 PM) from the parking lot. One bike (2011? Fuji Newest) was stolen from the bike rack next to my bike. I used a U lock properly and he used a cheap cable lock. No need to outrun bear, just outrun guy next to you, so my bike wasn't targeted even though it was better equipped.

The other bike is a 2016 KHS Vitamin B hybrid that was on a Thule bike rack with the lock engaged. Apparently they were able to wiggle it out of the lock simply by moving the straps that held the wheel down.

Unfortunately, the site management refuses to have cameras outside of the building because it "ruins the aesthetic". As an alternative, we may be getting clamshell bike covers, although not sure how much good that'll do.

Anyways, just had to get it off my chest, has any one had a bike stolen from work? How did your company deal with the situation?
 

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I had a nice bike stolen when I was a grad student.

I solved that problem by buying a crappy 35lb Schwinn 10-speed for $15 at the county bike auction. I rode it to class for 3 years and no one touched it. Tossed it in the dumpster when I left.
 

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Thule bike locks are useless. Remove the front tire while on the rack and you can pull the frame off which releases the tension on the wheel and it slides out.

A friend was going to leave a back-up bike on the rack overnight at a hotel when I enlightened him he chose another option.
 

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All bike thieves should be tazed repeatedly in the nads.
.
 

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I kept mine in my office while at work.
Heck yes. Why leave them outside? They aren't dirty, take up the space of a step ladder, and can be stored in the broom closet. It's so silly to treat them like the cars in the parking lot.
 

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"Crucifixion? Good. Out the door, line on the left, one cross each"
B^)

Heck yes. Why leave them outside? They aren't dirty, take up the space of a step ladder, and can be stored in the broom closet. It's so silly to treat them like the cars in the parking lot.
fredrico for campus security!
 

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B^)



fredrico for campus security!
I've used a Kryptonite U lock for 30 years. I still have the extra key. It has never failed. Then again, punks steal wheels and saddles, so maybe I've lucked out.

Obviously, a student can't take his bike into the classroom, so he's got to leave it unattended. So its like remembering to lock the car when leaving it. U locks never get hassled because there's always a nice cable lock to cut apart with bolt cutters. Also, at shopping malls, thieves go for the what they perceive is the "good stuff." An old bike with brake cables looping up and skinny steel frame doesn't qualify. Put fenders on it, and its even more undesirable on the black market.

Heck, some companies have enclosed racks that keep the bikes out of the rain. Companies that encourage biking to work are modifying infrastructures to accomodate bikes. I could see the day a student could roll his bike right up to the classroom door and prop it up against the wall. A simple cable lock would prevent it from being ridden off. Who's going to take a bolt cutter into a school building?

Lots of options here, folks. Call me lucky, but I've ridden the commuter 65,000 miles and still have it. All it took was a little prudence.

Some idiot lifted the nice frame fit pump the builder put on back in '85, largely because Silca pumps are considered cool again. Now I take the pump in the backpack when parking the bike at a shopping mall. Commuting and doing business, I ask to park the bike somewhere inside the building. The bank and hearing aid specialist are cool with that. If they can see the bike, its secure.
 

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Last year we were camped at a State Park near LAX, CA. We had 2 Nice MTB's locked to a rack on the rear of our camper (road bikes were locked on roof of truck). Woke up in the morning and both locks had been cut and the bikes were gone. Luckily we had good home owners insurance and both bikes were fully covered. I now carry 2 Kryptonite New York Fahgettaboudit Chain's for sketchy places. It was a significant investment for both locks but certainly cheaper than replacing even one of our MTB or road bikes!!
 

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We have bike racks in the stair wells that are in the building. It was nice when commuting was an option.

The facilities department decided about 5 years ago to do away with all over night lockers, and make them all day use only. Without somewhere to put a stash of clothes, shampoo, towel and such it pretty much ended any commuting by bike in my building. Good thing I work from home these days.
 

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Thieving is a pet peeve of mine, although I'm not so sure about the pet part. I do have strong feelings about it though. Hanging was good enough for horse thieves. It should also be appropriate for bike thieves. Not to mention, it precludes recidivism. I might not feel this way if my new shiny red Schwinn hadn't been stolen when I was 10 years old. I mighta' been permanently traumatized.
 

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Thieving is a pet peeve of mine, although I'm not so sure about the pet part. I do have strong feelings about it though. Hanging was good enough for horse thieves. It should also be appropriate for bike thieves. Not to mention, it precludes recidivism. I might not feel this way if my new shiny red Schwinn hadn't been stolen when I was 10 years old. I mighta' been permanently traumatized.
Real bummer.

You coulda been permanently traumatized, indeed.

I finally got my first bike at age 9, late in the game, and rode all over the neighborhoods and beyond. It was my escape exploration vehicle. I rode it three years.

One day I crashed into a cinderblock hidden in grass, bent the fork and broke a rib. My dad wouldn't replace the fork. This was his way of punishing me for carelessly hitting the cinderblock. So that was it for riding until taking it up as a tonic in mid-life crisis at age 39. My entire adult cycling life-style has in one sense been getting even with Dad.

So this stuff sticks around in your head long after life buries it in the past.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
2 weeks ago, the CEO sent out an email about what was planned for the situation. The intermediate fix is the company will be purchasing U locks that can be borrowed from the front desk. They are also in discussions with the site management to see if we can implement a covered bike cage with badge access. There was also some suggestions kicking around for covered bike clamshells.

Also, for what its worth, bikes are not allowed in the building for some reason, don't know why, but have been told there's a strict zero-tolerance policy on it.
 

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U locks never get hassled... thieves go for the what they perceive is the "good stuff." An old bike with brake cables looping up and skinny steel frame doesn't qualify.
wtf?

i take it you don't live in portland, seattle, new york, etc.

Call me lucky, but I've ridden the commuter 65,000 miles and still have it. All it took was a little prudence.
lucky, it takes much more than "prudence" and a u-lock. and that is why i never leave my bikes out of my site for more than five minutes ... unless they're inside my home, where i always keep them locked.
 

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