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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi gang
yesterday's ride tourned out to be a bummer, Too bad, it was a beautiful day, I was working in the mountains of NH where the temps were upper 90's and humid. I drove back to Maine later in the day and it was a beautiful 70 degress near the coast.

Well, on my usual post work ride, I got a flat about half way through. Crap. Anyways, put in the spare and inflated with the CO2, up and going in about 5 minutes, no sweat. However, about 5 minutes on my way, another flat. Having no way to call for a pick up, I pedaled my way home, about 3 more miles.

When I got back, I did find a pin hole on the first tube. In hindsight, I didn't inspect the tire to see if there might have been a piece of glass stuck in the tire to cause the 2nd flat.

Questions:

Could the CO2 have burst the 2nd tube? I didn't think they had enough capacity to burst the tire.

Even though I did ride home on a flat tire, should the rim be ok? I haven't inspected yet, what should I look for?

thanks for reading.
 

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sometimes tools or whatever in the seatbag can cause damage to the tube. or somehow you damaged the valve. or it was old. or bad luck

1 co2 cartridge won't give you enough pressure to burst the tube, and if it did wouldn't it have occurred right away?
 

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Hopefully you learned some lessons

Always carry a patch kit in addition to a spare tube. (a mini-pump is a very good idea, too.)
Always inspect the tire when fixing a flat, unless the cause is obvious (e.g., pinch flat).

You might have damaged the rim. Clincher rims don't take well to such treatment. Damage should be obvious on inspection -- places chewed up by contact with the road. If it's not too bad you might be able to smooth things with a fine file or sandpaper.

You can't "burst" a tube by over-inflating, unless the tire has a defect that the tube can protrude through, or the tire is improperly seated and blows off the rim. In any event, it's pretty much impossible to overinflate with one CO2 cartridge.

Flats happen. Two-flat rides are pretty common, too. If you're prepared, it needn't spoil the day. Better luck next time (and bring the patch kit).
 

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You'd know it if the tube was burst by the co2; your ears would still be ringing. A tube that bursts from overinflation usually displays a long slit where it blew; a tiny hole is a puncture.

Probably the debris that caused the first flat caused the second one.
 

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"Burst" tube?

A "burst" tube to me means a blow out. In your case it sounds like you did not check to see what caused the puncture with the first flat and whatever was embedded in your tire worked it's way through again and caused it to puncture the second time. Might have been a piece of glass or a thorn. Each time you have a flat, you have to check and see what caused it.


My record is 4 flats in one ride. Bad batch of tubes I got on sale.
 

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As other's have noted, carry equiptment for 2 flat repairs. I carry 2 tubes, 2 co2 cartidges, etc.

Been bitten by both bad batches of tubes (leading to a bias for a brand that has never failed me) and failing to find the cause of the flat until flat #2. And yes, have also had to use the phone - once - due to 3 flats in one ride...

Another consideration: I am very aggressive about rear tire changing. Flatting is no big deal but I'm both a heavy guy and a worrier. It impoves my ride enjoyment to know that I have done everything I can do to reduce the likelihood of 1) flatting in the first place, and 2)with the extra tube of getting stranded. A big part of the reason for 2 tubes is that having gotten 1 flat I don't have to cut off a ride or worry about venturing far from home...
 

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I had two flats yesterday exactly because I changed the first tube without closely checking the tire to see the piece of glass that had had caused the flat. (I had assumed it was a bad patch on that tube since I'd just put on an old, repaired tube the night before).

The second flat was caused by the same piece of glass.

I carry a tube and a small patch kit. I can't imagine why anyone would purposefully go out without being prepared, unless it's just a brain fart (mea culpa).

I happened to call for my friend rather than patch the second tube, because he was just behind me on the way to work and dropped me off.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Gentlemen/(and ladies?)
advice and comments much appreciated. Yes, my patch kit was safely stored away in a drawer at home. I will try to make room for it in the pack (that thing is getting full).

Will break everything down tonight.

best regards

John
 

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2 minute tire change

rugger said:
advice and comments much appreciated. Yes, my patch kit was safely stored away in a drawer at home. I will try to make room for it in the pack (that thing is getting full).
There's a fair risk in just packing up your regular patch kit and putting it in your seat bag. Those little tubes of glue are not very durable, and lots of people report finding a dried-out tube of glue when the moment of need arrives. I carry one spare tube and a few Park instant patches. I've used the instant patches less than a half dozen times, but they have worked to finish the ride.

Often times you will hear about people who can change a flat in less than two minutes. That's a nice demonstration to put on in your garage or at a bike show, but in the real world, it is IMPERATIVE that you figure out and deal with what caused the flat before you replace the tube and pump back up. It could be a pinch flat, tire defect, a bit of glass, sharp rock, or wire imbedded in the tire, or a problem with the rim strip. People often post here about multiple flat situations, but they don't diagnose the cause and so can't solve it.
 

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rugger said:
Gentlemen/(and ladies?)
advice and comments much appreciated. Yes, my patch kit was safely stored away in a drawer at home. I will try to make room for it in the pack (that thing is getting full).

Will break everything down tonight.

best regards

John
Rugger,
My solution is a bit off the wall since it is expensive but very effective. The next time you have to replace your wheels, go for the tubeless wheels and tires. Hopefully they will have come down in price by then.

After endless flats and a serious, helmet busting blowout, I switched over to tubeless a year ago and have not had a flat during a ride since (about 1800 miles). I did have a flat but it occured overnight from a piece of stainlees wire I picked up while in a pace line. I heard the clicking but continued to the end of the ride (about 12 miles) and forgot about it during the ensuing BS session. The next day I saw the wire in the tire as I was loading the bike and when I pulled it out, I could hear the air leak.

These tires have allowed me to regain the confidence I lost in a high speed crash caused by a blowout in a curve (paceline again).

I do realize that this is likely not a practical solution for you at this moment.

Bram
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Swiftsolo
Interesting to consider, I will check prices.

Epilogue:
I checked the tire, it seemed fine, no glass or obvious puncture. First tube may have just worn with a pinhole, I would presume that can happen.

My guess on 2nd tube is a pinch flat, which is when the tube isn't installed properly? Could be the case here, since I changed it somewhat quickly hoping to beat a thunderstorm.

The rim seemed ok, I ran my fingers along both edges, no apparent damage, visual or tactile, and tape was still in place. I pumped it up yesterday and is holding pressure ok. Will venture out on it tomorrow. Was unable to repair first tube, my guess is it just wore out. +1 for tubeless!
 

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Yes sh1t happens

2 weeks ago and I was in a hurry - 40km commuting, but also hoping to make it a pleasure ride.

At 20km, I went through a nail. It stuck in the tyre for 2-3 revolutions. Made a fearsome noise, whacked the rear caliper and frame. I replaced the tube.

40 minutes or so later, 2 km from the finish, the same again (maybe not a nail but something sharp, large and jagged) but worse. it sounded like a car crashed into me and totaled the bike. I grabbed the bike and ran, only just making my appointment.

On subsequent inspection :
1) the rear caliper is badly scratched underneath. Object #2 did more damage than #1.
2) seat stay fork nicked through the paint through to the carbon.
3) chainstay fork paint badly scratched in the BB area.
4) chainstay scratched, opposite the chainring, clearcoat and maybe cosmetic carbon wrap is affected.
5) 1 tube (it was new) has big hole
6) 1 tube (the spare, also new) just about trashed - repairable but not reliable
7) tire (fortunately an old worn one on loan from my commuter bike) just about scrap - it limps on with massive gaitering.
8) the rear rim got a nick and a bad scratch. I was in the process of selling the wheelset and this new embellishment did nothing to improve the resale value of the otherwise immaculate Aksiums..... sigh!

Fortunately the frame damage is cosmetic only and in hidden spots.

The worst two punctures I have ever seen or personally endured, all in one ride :cryin: :cryin:
 

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Pinch flats

rugger said:
My guess on 2nd tube is a pinch flat, which is when the tube isn't installed properly? Could be the case here, since I changed it somewhat quickly hoping to beat a thunderstorm.
If it's really a pinch flat, it will have the characteristic "snake bite" pattern: two closely-spaced holes. It comes from the rim bottoming out on a road obstacle (rock, pothole, etc.) and the cause is not improper installation but under-inflation -- also likely with a quick repair.
 

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Rim Tape??

I read through all of the replies and only found one that mentioned rim tape. I had several flats and couldn't figure out what was causing them. The roads/trails I ride are clean, but you never know. Finally, I looked really closely at the punctures and they were happening in the same place. Inspected the rim and found a hole had punched in the tape, exposing the spoke end. Put new tape on and the problem was solved. No flats since. This solved my problem, maybe not yours, but it's a good idea to check the tape every now and then.
 
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