Road Bike, Cycling Forums banner
1 - 8 of 8 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
54 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Camyphiles:
Can anyone shed any light on an issue I am having. My 2003 Record rear hub chews up the outer freehub bearing (6803) about once a year. It's not a huge deal to replace (as I've done it 3 times now) but I'm wondering if anyone has any idea WHY? The same bearing on the inboard side has never need to be replaced, nor have the axle bearings - all still smooth.

The bearing retainer, first, then the balls literally get ground up. Pop out what's let of the bearing and push another in and good to go, but only for about a year. Needed to do this the last 3 years, but never before on these 10 year old hubs. They been built up onto 3-4 different sets of rims over the years (currently on Stan's ZTR Alpha 400)

Also any suggestions on possible use of ceramic bearings? Where to get them? will they hold up better.

Thanks
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,492 Posts
Not any help, but all my bikes have Campy hubs, I've done lots of miles and never had this happen. The most I have done is replace cones and bearings on an old abused used wheelset I bought.

Something not right with alignment? Axle slightly bent?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
54 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks for the responses. This has happened with a C50 Colnago (now retired frame) and now a M10. The C50's drop outs MAY have been misaligned, but no way to find out now.
With a slightly bent axle is it possible to ONLY affect one bearing and not notice anything else. For example not rolling smoothly or spinning easily on the stand?
Lastly, I've been using "homemade" lube (4-5 pts mineral spirits to 1 pt oil) for the past 4+ years. I wonder if that might have contributed to corroding retainers?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,492 Posts
It makes no difference to how the wheel behaves on the stand. the freehub is irrelevant at that point, it's just along for the ride.

are you commonly riding in wet or salty conditions? cant think what else would contribute to corrosion, and of course to bearing failure.

one way to test our theory is to pull it apart and have the spindle checked out at a machine shop for straightness.
 

·
Big is relative
Joined
·
11,887 Posts
Replace both freehub bearings. They're cheap and it would eliminate the possibility that the inner bearing is oversized and putting all the load on the outer bearing.
 

·
Big is relative
Joined
·
11,887 Posts
I haven't had any problems yet even though I have some fairly old hubs. But, just out of curiosity, how are you getting the old bearings out and the new ones in.
The outer bearing is pressed in and the inner one has a snap ring retainer. You have to take the outer one out to access the inner one. The outer one just taps out and there's a alloy sleeve between them. It's a pain.
 
1 - 8 of 8 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top