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LOOK lover
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616 Posts
Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Well, it took 2 years, but I finally got this thing built the way I want. It started out as a road bike that I modified for time trials as needed. When it became clear that I was going to be able to build another road bike, I dedicated this one to time trialing - got the integrated aerobars on it last year, and the recently-purchased wheelset was the final piece of the puzzle.

This is one rock-steady frame! I really enjoyed riding it as a road bike - it pretty much did everything from climbing to sprinting with a gliding, silky-smooth ride. It's equally impressive as a TT rig, and the high comfort factor is a real plus for doing 40-k at threshold!

I've listed details of the build and attached some pictures. The last picture shows it with the DuraAce 7700 clincher wheelset w/ Maxxis Detonator tires that I use when training.

Frame: 2004 LOOK KG486 High-Modulus monocoque carbon, size M (53 cm)
Fork: LOOK HSC4 carbon, 1 1/8" carbon steerer
Colour: Gloss black
Cranks: Shimano DuraAce 7800, 172.5 mm, 53X39
Bottom bracket: Shimano DuraAce 7800
Cassette: Shimano DuraAce 7800, 11-23
Chain: Shimano DuraAce 7800 w/ Connex link
Front derailleur: Shimano DuraAce 7800
Rear derailleur: Shimano DuraAce 7800
Headset: FSA carbon integrated
Bars: ITM CX2 Dual aerobar
Shifters: Shimano DuraAce 7800 bar end
Brake levers: Cane Creek Aero
Brake calipers: Shimano DuraAce 7800
Tape: Stella Azzura Eleganza red/black
Seat post: Thomson Elite aluminum, 27.2 mm, black
Saddle: Fizik Arione Triathlon
Wheels: Zipp 808 tubular (front); Zipp 909 disc tubular (rear)
Tyres: Zipp tubular, 700x21
Pedals: Shimano DuraAce SPD-SL 7800
Computer: Mavic WinTech wireless
Bottle cage: Weyless Leggero carbon Team-1
Other: Specialty Racing Products red anodized cassette lockring, crankset bolts, rear derailleur bolt/pulley screws
Total weight: Who cares? This thing is fast!
 

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LOOK lover
Joined
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616 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
Lab Worker said:
your seatpost is the wrong way around though :eek:
I'll be [email protected], I think you're right!

Easy enough to fix - but I'll have to give the guys at the shop some grief about that one :D
 

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Registered
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188 Posts
Looks Great!!!

Niiiice....
Mine is the 486 Special Edition (Two Tone Paint) Grey/Orange, I can't wait to see it completed. It's sitting at my LBS waiting on Strongliht Cranks and ZG brakes...
The Fulcrum Racing 1 whls, FSA bars and Dura-Ace comps are already on.
All it takes is money and patience... (ALOT of each)
Thanks again for the pix, I hope mine "LOOKS" as nice...
 

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LOOK lover
Joined
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616 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
ROGER79 said:
Niiiice....
Mine is the 486 Special Edition (Two Tone Paint) Grey/Orange, I can't wait to see it completed. It's sitting at my LBS waiting on Strongliht Cranks and ZG brakes...
The Fulcrum Racing 1 whls, FSA bars and Dura-Ace comps are already on.
All it takes is money and patience... (ALOT of each)
Thanks again for the pix, I hope mine "LOOKS" as nice...
I can't wait to see pics. I got mine just before the Special Editions came out - I'm not sure which one I would've gotten. The grey/orange will be hot for sure, and last week I saw someone with the blue/white - it was gorgeous.
 

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GeoCyclist
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655 Posts
Dual use bike question???

This looks like something I might consider. I’m looking at competing in Duathlons and haven’t convinced myself to buy a TT bike. The new bike purchase quandary is more of a storage than cost issue. After reading your post, it has me thinking this could be the answer to my problem; however, I have a couple of questions.

Do you encounter a fit problem when using a Road frame for a TT bike. My concern is the difference between the frame geometries; i.e. steeper seat tube angle on TT frame. When you add the aero bars on your road frame, does this give you the same body position as you would achieve on a TT frame?

Is it a real issue to change the equipment between your TT set-up and Road set-up? I would still intend to use the one bike for road racing; therefore, I’d be changing the equipment prior to training and competing in Duathlons. I can’t see this being a real problem; just keep two completely separate sets of bar/stem, shifters/brakes levers, and cables between the two set-ups. Do you see any issues with this?

Do you find that you are switching between your TT and Road bike several times a week? This might be a training issue that I have not considered.

Your thoughts, and or comments, are appreciated!
 

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LOOK lover
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616 Posts
Discussion Starter #7 (Edited)
Geocyclist -- if you must use one bike for both road and multisport it should be standard road geometry, and your TT position should not be that different from your road position. Generating power in a radically different aerodynamic position requires regular training in that position, which is difficult without a separate, dedicated TT bike.

You will note, however, that I am using standard road geometry for a dedicated TT bike. That's because I don't do multisport (anymore!). While the steeper seat tube of a triathlon frame arguably allows better aerodynamics, its chief advantage is to de-emphasize the quadricep muscles and save leg strength for the run after the bike in multisport events. In pure time trials, however, you want to fully utilize all of the leg muscles for maximum power. Increases in aerodynamics are counter-productive if they reduce the ability to generate power. This is not to say that triathlon frames cannot be used for time trials - which they can. But there is no inherent advantage to using them over road geometry frames assuming proper fit. A very aerodynamic, forward position can be acheived on most standard road geometry frames by selecting the proper top tube length and using a zero setback seatpost. In fact, the KG486 has been used as a TT bike and as a triathlon bike on the pro level with great success. I road race and do crits on my other bikes, but time trialing is my strength, and I train on this bike weekly.

As for switching out equipment when converting to/from tri/road - yes, it's a bit of a hassle, but not prohibitively so. A separate integrated aerobar setup with shifters/levers is a little trickier than just adding clip-ons to a standard road bar because you have to touch up the shifting each time. Again, however, you should try to keep your aero position on the bike fairly close to your normal road position. Unless, that is, you are willing to switch out once a week for training - in which case you can gradually optimize your aerodynamic position as you gain comfort and the ability to maintain power.
 

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GeoCyclist
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655 Posts
Another Question answered

Thanks for the quick reply. You answered another question that I had failed to ask; the difference between TT and Tri bikes. With this bit of new found knowledge I can see my one bike solution is not going to work; as I need to be looking at Tri bike geometry and not TT bikes for duathlon / triathlon events. I’ve only done a single duathlon to date; however, I’m now getting interested in doing these events more frequently.

I will be moving to a very flat country (Bahrain) this summer and my days of mountain road cycling are coming to an end. I’m just starting to look into the local cycling scene and it appears there is an active racing calendar with a combination of road, TT, duathlon, and triathlon events. The only difference will be no hills and the season runs fall through spring to avoid the summer heat. Hopefully, I’ll get a bigger place to live and can expand my collection of bicycles; as it appears my single road bike will not be enough.

Once again, appreciate the reply!
 
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