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snowbound said:
You are *supposed* to use a special tool, though you can get by without one... I'd reccomend a whipperman link.
Campy recommends their tool, but it is no longer like the special tool for their original 10s chains. Now, using a normal chain tool is not just "getting by." That said, the Wipperman is the obvious answer.
 

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An ordinary chain tool will install the HD-L pin. Drape the chain over the BB shell to eliminate any tension on the chain while the pin is installed from the left side (per campy's instructions).

As others noted, the wipperman connex link is the best way to go. Campy has redesigned the 10 speed chain for 2006. It's now narrower. I haven't got one to measure, but the outside width is narrower, so the width of the connex link may now be too wide for the best fit. Perhaps the narrower shimano version of the wipperman link will prove to fit the new chain better.
 

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Squirrel Hunter
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Just Installed

C-40 said:
An ordinary chain tool will install the HD-L pin. Drape the chain over the BB shell to eliminate any tension on the chain while the pin is installed from the left side (per campy's instructions).
Just installed a Campy chain Sunday and it worked just fine with a standard, shop quality Park chain tool. I have had problems installing Campy chains in the past with lower quality chain tools. Follow C-40's suggestions re: draping the chain and the inside out installation from the left side. Go to Parks web site and note the picture of a Campy chain installation where the guys thumb is holding/guiding the pin. Take care that the pin goes in straight. A little gentle lateral twisting freed up the stiff link.
 

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C-40 said:
An ordinary chain tool will install the HD-L pin. Drape the chain over the BB shell to eliminate any tension on the chain while the pin is installed from the left side (per campy's instructions).

As others noted, the wipperman connex link is the best way to go. Campy has redesigned the 10 speed chain for 2006. It's now narrower. I haven't got one to measure, but the outside width is narrower, so the width of the connex link may now be too wide for the best fit. Perhaps the narrower shimano version of the wipperman link will prove to fit the new chain better.
I installed a 2006 Campy thin chain last night. I'm not sure where to measure it but the measurement across the pin is 6.55 mm. If you measure the Connex link on the pin, you can compare it to that. I used a standard Park chain tool.

 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Keeping up with Junior said:
Just installed a Campy chain Sunday and it worked just fine with a standard, shop quality Park chain tool. I have had problems installing Campy chains in the past with lower quality chain tools. Follow C-40's suggestions re: draping the chain and the inside out installation from the left side. Go to Parks web site and note the picture of a Campy chain installation where the guys thumb is holding/guiding the pin. Take care that the pin goes in straight. A little gentle lateral twisting freed up the stiff link.

Excellent news. This is what I already have :)


Thanks for the responses everyone.
 

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I've installed my Campy chains with a standard chain tool; you just have to be careful. I also carry a spare IRD 10-speed link of course.
 

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where to measure...

The width of concern is across the inner plates, right at the hole for the pin. If you have leftover links, find an exposed end and measure it. The old chain measured .155 inch or 3.94mm in this area.

The width across the outer plates is supposed to be in the neighborhood of 5.9mm. The old chain was 6.1mm. Don't measure across the pins, move over to the side of a pin.
 

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Wipperman

I've been using the Wipperman link on Record chains for a few years, works great, the new Campy chain is 1mm thinner, not sure if this will affect the link
 

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vegan wrench
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Keeping up with Junior said:
A little gentle lateral twisting freed up the stiff link.
This is not good advice. If you stop pushing the pin at the correct point the link will not get stiff. Twisting the link is a sure method of causing a failure down the line.
 

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Squirrel Hunter
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Delicate

bloodthirstylust said:
Twisting the link is a sure method of causing a failure down the line.
Perhaps I should have used the word delicate and bend instead of gentle and twist to conform with the Campagnolo instructions. You do make a good point though that the link should not be so stiff that it indicates overinsertion. Need to strike that fine balance.

http://www.campagnolo.com/pdf/7225301_Ultra_Narrow_chain.pdf
Page 31... Make sure that the chain closure does not present any "harsh points" or links that do not bend freely (Fig. 17). Free the joints as required with delicated lateral bending of the links.
 

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correct, twisting the cain CAN be a point of failure.
One must be careful to not push the pin to far in the chain, so it will slip out from the side
and make accident. The pin MUST sit excactly in the middle of the chain.
When I am mounting a new chain, I press the pin in the chain with my tool, until I feel that it slides easier inside (weak click/torques easier, difficult to describe the feeling)
(often difficult to feel this, there is very small margins betweeth the both ends...)
Then I break of the insert ends, double checking that the pins are sitting excactly in the middle.
(use your fingers to check out how far out the pin are sticking out of the chain and compare it to the other side/other chains). If not, I'll use the tool again to align the pin correctly.
It is seldom I need to wiggle when the pin are sitting correct. Just be careful!
Never had any chainproblems following my procedure.

(sorry for my crappy english, my brain is somewhat crappy today) ;)
 

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vegan wrench
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Keeping up with Junior said:
Perhaps I should have used the word delicate and bend instead of gentle and twist to conform with the Campagnolo instructions. You do make a good point though that the link should not be so stiff that it indicates overinsertion. Need to strike that fine balance.

http://www.campagnolo.com/pdf/7225301_Ultra_Narrow_chain.pdf
to me, lateral implies bending the chain side to side, which i don't think is a good idea and to me is the "obvious" way to free up a stiff link. however, although campagnolo uses the word lateral, their diagram has someone bending the chain in the direction a chain would wrap around a cog/chainring. i don't have a problem bending the chain in that direction.
 
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