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The Peloton Magazine article seems to attempt to adress both of the questions that have been raised. I don't think anyone knows more than that right now (at least I don't).
 

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LA CHEVRE
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same as CAAD10/EVO fork to me. the fork is curved so they moved dropouts back to compensate that.
Yep, not a new idea. Basically, the wheel is positionned in the same spot as it would be on a normal fork, but to help create the semi-suspension, the legs are curved further forward so the dropouts are rearward facing to account for the legs' more pronounced curve.

The legs curving more forward adds directional flex and the dropouts being rearward add some kind of leverage to help the leg flex. What's new and not on the Evo and CAAD 10 though is the twisted orientation of some of the carbon fibers in areas of the fork (also in the seatstays) that helps the flex a tad more (longer fibers flex more easily) but the shape of the fork helps keep it very stiff laterally and that twist apparently also controls the rebound of the flex...

And yes, so far, the new Synapse is only available in Hi-Mod... I'm taking a wild guess it will eventualy be available in a cheaper version with the standard Mod carbon... perhaps for the next model year, perhaps along with a disc-brake compatible version.
 

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LA CHEVRE
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Only thing interesting from the article is that his 61cm Synapse with Speedplay Zeros track pedals was 6.93kg, not bad for an endurance bike, of that size, with clinchers, steel spindled pedals and heavy FSA parts...
 

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Only thing interesting from the article is that his 61cm Synapse with Speedplay Zeros track pedals was 6.93kg, not bad for an endurance bike, of that size, with clinchers, steel spindled pedals and heavy FSA parts...
I agree, that is very light for bikes in this class and it's even competitive with some comfortable riding race oriented all-arounders like the Supersix Evo and Felt F Series. The lines seem to be blurring between "race" and "endurance" bikes due to the popularity of gran fondo and gravel rides/races. Felt is marketing it's newly designed Z Series in a similar way as is Devinci with their new Leo SL. The price sounds like it is going to be pretty steep on the new Synapse, however. That might make a Leo SL or Z Series a more attractive option for folks looking for this kind of bike:

Cannondale Synapse Hi-Mod 2014 Road Bike – First Look - BikeRadar

Felt Bicycles 2013 Z and ZW-Series - YouTube

Cycles Devinci 2012 Leo SL product presentation - YouTube
 

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LA CHEVRE
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I agree, that is very light for bikes in this class and it's even competitive with some comfortable riding race oriented all-arounders like the Supersix Evo and Felt F Series. The lines seem to be blurring between "race" and "endurance" bikes due to the popularity of gran fondo and gravel rides/races. Felt is marketing it's newly designed Z Series in a similar way as is Devinci with their new Leo SL. The price sounds like it is going to be pretty steep on the new Synapse, however. That might make a Leo SL or Z Series a more attractive option for folks looking for this kind of bike:

Cannondale Synapse Hi-Mod 2014 Road Bike – First Look - BikeRadar

Felt Bicycles 2013 Z and ZW-Series - YouTube

Cycles Devinci 2012 Leo SL product presentation - YouTube
Well, Cannondale, Felt, Devinci, everyone has a bike for that category nowadays, Specialized, Trek, BMC, Giant.... I find it odd that just now they say the Synapse is more aimed between endurance and race, it's been that way for the old Synapse for years, it's not new that the team have raced Synapses in the cobbled classics, perhaps it's just that, with Peter Sagan's success and popularity, it brought the attention to it while in past years, their use was more low-key. The new one has a racier geometry, is lighter and has better power transmission but the old one wasn't a slow hybrid bike either!

For prices, the Synapses will probably have similar pricing to SuperSix Evos with comparable specs, given the bikes you get, they're not overpriced IMO.

I find it sad to say it because it's one of the only local company here and I'd love them to do well only for that but Devinci's customer support and the trouble to get them to honor their warranty is so bad, enough to never consider one. Maybe they make more money building bikes for public bike sharing programs across the world these days that they don't care about their individual consumers, they'd rather sell a few thousand bikes to NYC, London or other very lucrative contracts.
 

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Well, Cannondale, Felt, Devinci, everyone has a bike for that category nowadays, Specialized, Trek, BMC, Giant.... I find it odd that just now they say the Synapse is more aimed between endurance and race, it's been that way for the old Synapse for years, it's not new that the team have raced Synapses in the cobbled classics, perhaps it's just that, with Peter Sagan's success and popularity, it brought the attention to it while in past years, their use was more low-key. The new one has a racier geometry, is lighter and has better power transmission but the old one wasn't a slow hybrid bike either!

For prices, the Synapses will probably have similar pricing to SuperSix Evos with comparable specs, given the bikes you get, they're not overpriced IMO.

I find it sad to say it because it's one of the only local company here and I'd love them to do well only for that but Devinci's customer support and the trouble to get them to honor their warranty is so bad, enough to never consider one. Maybe they make more money building bikes for public bike sharing programs across the world these days that they don't care about their individual consumers, they'd rather sell a few thousand bikes to NYC, London or other very lucrative contracts.

I hear ya and totally get that you are a Cannondale man. I actually only think it's a problem if there aren't non-Hi-Mod options. $4,000-$10,000 is alot for a bike for most people regardless of how good it is. People looking for "endurance" type rides have often been reluctant to go that far for the most part as I understand it. The entry point for the new Felt Z Series is under $2000 and a Leo SL frameset is $1999 for instance. I actually hope they stay pretty close to current Synapse prices and have as broad a range of options as possible with Hi-Mod and non-Hi-Mod frames and different builds. I think that's the win-win because they come away with a product line that falls within most cyclists' budgets. This is the kind of bike that could have mass appeal if tons of people can identify a model that they can afford. That's one of Cannondale's strenghths and I hope they don't abandon it with the new Synapse.

As far as the changes and race label goes. For years it has seemed like the endurance category has been more comfort than race and now companies are trying to flip that by producing more comfortable "race" bikes (or are at least making their endurance bikes more race oriented). They seem to be stiffening the frames up a little bit by using carbon blends that are on par with their top level race machines, lightening the weight and lowering the the headtubes some, etc. Felt's Z Series is now around 1000g and also has an improved bottom bracket system for instance. Ridley's new Fenix is another example and it come's in at around $1700 for the frameset and under $3,000 for a nicely equipped complete bike.
 
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