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Per your bike's specs "Tires 26mm maximum width****", so the answer is likely "no".

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Most likely not as most mainstream road racer is limited to 28c max, if even. 31c pushing beyong the envelop. this question should be asked to the BMS support

but why would you want to put a 31c tire on a 23mm wide rim? It's akin to making your tire into the bulbous off-road tire. It's good and more cushy for going in a straight line, but carving will suck
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Most likely not as most mainstream road racer is limited to 28c max, if even. 31c pushing beyong the envelop. this question should be asked to the BMS support

but why would you want to put a 31c tire on a 23mm wide rim? It's akin to making your tire into the bulbous off-road tire. It's good and more cushy for going in a straight line, but carving will suck
Thanks.. I was watching time trial tour de france and saw valverde crash around a wet curve..
Watch this - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=t46JY1ur8LA

Speed is not too much of an issue for a non professional rider like me.. but safety is.. Im just getting into road bikes.. Please suggest a better tire with more traction and safety..
Thank you guys !
 

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And the 'c' goes w/ the '700' to describe the wheel diameter. The tire is 31mm wide, so it should be 700c x 31mm. Everyone does it wrong, but that's the way it should be.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
And the 'c' goes w/ the '700' to describe the wheel diameter. The tire is 31mm wide, so it should be 700c x 31mm. Everyone does it wrong, but that's the way it should be.
So will a 700 c X 31 mm tire fit my bike? Thanks
 

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So in your new 25mm tires, put about 62 psi in the front and 78 psi in the rear. Give or take five or so.

They should be comfortable, have great traction, be safe in all conditions and provide extra safety via their reflective sidewalls. I use them, love them.
 

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Thanks.. I was watching time trial tour de france and saw valverde crash around a wet curve..
Watch this - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=t46JY1ur8LA

Speed is not too much of an issue for a non professional rider like me.. but safety is.. Im just getting into road bikes.. Please suggest a better tire with more traction and safety..
Thank you guys !
A wider tire wont give you more grip in wet conditions (or in general). Rubber compound and the ability to clear water out of the way is what supplies the grip when its wet. Painted lines are extremely slick when wet no matter what tire you're using. My 23mm Continental Gatorskins have far more grip than I dare to use on wet roads and I'm very brave through corners.

On a side note about tire pressure. Sportbike riding on track days we actually increased tire pressure in wet conditions to keep the tread open to clear water. I imagine keeping the sharp profile of a skinny road bike tire would clear standing water much easier than a wide tire at low pressure.
 

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A wider tire wont give you more grip in wet conditions (or in general). Rubber compound and the ability to clear water out of the way is what supplies the grip when its wet. Painted lines are extremely slick when wet no matter what tire you're using. My 23mm Continental Gatorskins have far more grip than I dare to use on wet roads and I'm very brave through corners.

On a side note about tire pressure. Sportbike riding on track days we actually increased tire pressure in wet conditions to keep the tread open to clear water. I imagine keeping the sharp profile of a skinny road bike tire would clear standing water much easier than a wide tire at low pressure.
Speed and surface area being what it is the smart thinking has always been to lower bicycle tire pressures about 10psi when it's wet.
 

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Simple physics. Higher pressure on narrower tire produces smaller contact patch, but results in greater downward force between the tire and the road. A wider tire has larger contact patch, but that also translates to less force exerted onto the road by the tire, thus reducing traction.

I believe the biggest contributor in staying upright, regardless of conditions, is maintaining proper balance and be mindful of weight transfer while braking.

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Simple physics. Higher pressure on narrower tire produces smaller contact patch, but results in greater downward force between the tire and the road. A wider tire has larger contact patch, but that also translates to less force exerted onto the road by the tire, thus reducing traction.

I believe the biggest contributor in staying upright, regardless of conditions, is maintaining proper balance and be mindful of weight transfer while braking.

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Physics always wins!!!

Same rider weight but on a sharper tire profile will slice through standing water easier every time. Which would warrant running a higher psi while its raining. If a wider tire also has a softer rubber compound more suited to wet conditions it could very well have more grip but it will still hydroplane in standing water easier than a narrow tire.

Larger contact patch does not translate into higher friction coefficient whether its wet or dry. Its primarily the rubber compound that provides grip.

I got rid of TV so I haven't been watching the TdF but I'm pretty sure it was the slick painted lines that the riders kept falling on. They can be like ice when wet. Also be aware of any road with a smooth texture in wet conditions like some old chip seal roads can get.
 

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Physics always wins!!!

Same rider weight but on a sharper tire profile will slice through standing water easier every time. Which would warrant running a higher psi while its raining. If a wider tire also has a softer rubber compound more suited to wet conditions it could very well have more grip but it will still hydroplane in standing water easier than a narrow tire.

Larger contact patch does not translate into higher friction coefficient whether its wet or dry. Its primarily the rubber compound that provides grip.

I got rid of TV so I haven't been watching the TdF but I'm pretty sure it was the slick painted lines that the riders kept falling on. They can be like ice when wet. Also be aware of any road with a smooth texture in wet conditions like some old chip seal roads can get.
If you think a bicycle can hydroplane on wet roads you'd be confused.
 

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Simple physics. Higher pressure on narrower tire produces smaller contact patch, but results in greater downward force between the tire and the road. A wider tire has larger contact patch, but that also translates to less force exerted onto the road by the tire, thus reducing traction.
Uhhh no, changing air pressure does not lessen the force exerted onto the road by the tire. If you and your bike weigh 170lbs, there will always be 170lbs force exerted onto the road by the tires.
That's simply physics.
 

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A wider tire wont give you more grip in wet conditions (or in general). Rubber compound and the ability to clear water out of the way is what supplies the grip when its wet. Painted lines are extremely slick when wet no matter what tire you're using. My 23mm Continental Gatorskins have far more grip than I dare to use on wet roads and I'm very brave through corners.
I'm not so sure about additional width not helping on wet surfaces, but what I am sure about is a Gatorskin being a pretty unimpressive wet weather tire, regardless of width. This is a pretty common complaint with those tires, along with a somewhat rough ride quality. I've experienced both issues. If you want to have some fun in the wet, try a 25c GP4000s II or 4-Seasons (and probably lots of other tires that aren't Gatorskins).

When it comes to trying to squeeze large tires on a road frame, keep in mind that widths vary between manufacturers and rim widths. For reference, a 25c GP4000 measures 27.5mm wide on my 17.5mm internal rims. Generally, the wider the rim, the wider the tire will be for a given size. The 27.5s fit my frame with room to spare, but that width/height is about the safe limit of most forks that I've owned. They are my current go-to tires though. They're pretty much great at everything, and bumping up from a 23c was noticeable. I say try that route. 2-packs are pretty cheap on eBay (~$70), and if they don't fit, just sell them.
 

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Uhhh no, changing air pressure does not lessen the force exerted onto the road by the tire. If you and your bike weigh 170lbs, there will always be 170lbs force exerted onto the road by the tires.
That's simply physics.
Correct. Force will not change, but increased air pressure reduces a tire's contact patch, thus same force results in higher contact pressure between the tire and road.

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If you think a bicycle can hydroplane on wet roads you'd be confused.
Exactly. Sipes on road tires just provide edges, they're not needed for water dispersion. And edges can be good on a slick road. Rubber compounds likely have more of an effect in the wet than a couple of mm width difference.
 
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