Road Bike, Cycling Forums banner
1 - 17 of 17 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,079 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
anyone here able to hold 400 watts for any amount of time? Been trying to do a few mins so far, about at Boulder altitude (5340ft). I find it much easier to spin a faster rpm but even then i cant keep it constant tending to spike too 420/440w or drop to 370w. Im sure it gets easier when you get stronger but for those of u than can hold it for 5,10 min or more whats your technique higher rpm or bigger gear? BTW IM 6'3" 168lbs prolly have another 5lbs i could possibly lose.

-Jon
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
681 Posts
I usually can only do it in high torque situations, either a steep hill (10%+) in something like 39-21 or 53-14 or so on the flats, i need to feel some tension in my legs in order to hold it, around 10minutes. 6'0 175lbs.
 
G

·
If you haven't been pacing with a power meter long you'll also get much better at it with just a bit of practice.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
447 Posts
6'4, 175 currently, I top out at 4:00 or so, I'm aiming to get my 5 minute up to 400 by May. My technique is a big fast gear legs pumping fast always works for me
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
231 Posts
Forced watts will help. ie. hills, heavy trainer load.
 

·
TWD
Joined
·
540 Posts
so is the training strategy to pick a wattage and try to hold it for the max time (high wattage interval) and not focus on building FTP? If you have race data showing you need to hit that wattage for a certain amount of time I can see the reasoning but not sure that's the best way to build power? Internet coaches please fill in here

realize you question it about RPM's ... sorry in advance for the tangent
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,079 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
thats what coach had me doing the other year, albeit this is at altitude which is much harder by about 40 watts i'd say for 5340ft.
 

·
Dweebus Maximus
Joined
·
211 Posts
Travis said:
so is the training strategy to pick a wattage and try to hold it for the max time (high wattage interval) and not focus on building FTP? If you have race data showing you need to hit that wattage for a certain amount of time I can see the reasoning but not sure that's the best way to build power? Internet coaches please fill in here
Variety is the spice of life. Training focusing on FTP only is going to work for time trials, but leave you wildly unprepared for the demands of most road races. It's pretty rare to find the podium with steady state output alone. Build your FTP, and build your power for shorter, more intense durations also. Building FTP and also increasing power over durations of 1-5 minutes are not completely unrelated, especially in race conditions where you need to recover and be ready to all it all over again, and again, and again. However, to really get sharp you need to do some training at the actual intensity levels you will encounter within a race, and 400w is just the tip of the iceberg.
 

·
extremely biased
Joined
·
870 Posts
Holding a certain wattage after pulling it out of a hat is pretty pointless.

Look at w/kg not raw watts. I know guys that can hold 375 for and hour and have 5 min power in the 500+ and 1 min at 800+, but they are 185 pound or more.

Starnut
 

·
Cycling Coach
Joined
·
1,734 Posts
bauerb said:
my v02max is 400w, so i can usually only get 1min or so at that level
You should be able to maintain a power that induces VO2 Max for ~ 3 - 8 minutes.

If you cannot sustain 400W for more than 1-minute, then the power that induces your VO2 Max is lower than you think. Or you are very fatigued when attempting to do so.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,079 Posts
Discussion Starter · #12 ·
STARNUT said:
Holding a certain wattage after pulling it out of a hat is pretty pointless.

Look at w/kg not raw watts. I know guys that can hold 375 for and hour and have 5 min power in the 500+ and 1 min at 800+, but they are 185 pound or more.

Starnut

umm...i did say my coach gave me the 400w number
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,079 Posts
Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Circlip said:
Variety is the spice of life. Training focusing on FTP only is going to work for time trials, but leave you wildly unprepared for the demands of most road races. It's pretty rare to find the podium with steady state output alone. Build your FTP, and build your power for shorter, more intense durations also. Building FTP and also increasing power over durations of 1-5 minutes are not completely unrelated, especially in race conditions where you need to recover and be ready to all it all over again, and again, and again. However, to really get sharp you need to do some training at the actual intensity levels you will encounter within a race, and 400w is just the tip of the iceberg.
of course that's not all I do, when did i say it was? sometimes I even ride with no hands :0B
 

·
Cycling Coach
Joined
·
1,734 Posts
Alex_Simmons/RST said:
You should be able to maintain a power that induces VO2 Max for ~ 3 - 8 minutes.

If you cannot sustain 400W for more than 1-minute, then the power that induces your VO2 Max is lower than you think. Or you are very fatigued when attempting to do so.
Although having said that, it can be the case that if you are attempting these efforts on an indoor set up that you struggle to generate power on, then you'd need to find an alternative.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
896 Posts
alex you are correct. my last V02max test result showed that I sustained 430 for 1min, and 400 for 2mins. this test started at around 250 watts and added 30w every 2mins. so, with a less taxing "warmup" i probably could have held 400 for more than 3mins
 

·
Cycling Coach
Joined
·
1,734 Posts
bauerb said:
alex you are correct. my last V02max test result showed that I sustained 430 for 1min, and 400 for 2mins. this test started at around 250 watts and added 30w every 2mins. so, with a less taxing "warmup" i probably could have held 400 for more than 3mins
Well even in that test that's what you did. Last two steps:
2-min @ 400W
1-min @ 430W
= an avg of 410W for final 3-min

so you are either too fatigued to complete your workout (and hence need some rest/recovery time) or the trainer set up you are using is less than ideal for these sorts of efforts. If that's all you've got, then suggest you go for the "Alls you can do is alls you can do approach" and find a level you can sustain.

Interval work should primarily be guided by what you've actually been able to do, rather than reference some fitness marker (which is handy for setting a good place to start from).
 
1 - 17 of 17 Posts
Top