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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Any noticeable quality or weight difference? I'm rebuilding my RB1 stockish. Keeping the 6spd freewheel and dt-shifters, adding Tektro brake levers, and need to purchase a new front hub, crankset, set of derailers, and set of brakes.

Plenty of 80s stuff on Ebay, but the 9spd stuff is cheap and new. Which way do you think I should go?

-Shay

Edit: this is regarding Shimano 105 stuff.
 

· Carbon Fiber = Explode!
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Yes and no. Plenty of vintage high quality parts are good for life. Plenty of modern stuff sucks and vice versa.

It all depends whether or not you want a modern or vintage gruppo. I would always side with the new stuff, but vintage holds a part in my heart, especially Suntour groups.
 

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For derailluers and brakes many 80's stuff perform and weigh the same, as long as it is, or close to, top of the line. You'll lose out on more gears and index but who really needs them anyways.

Today's bearings are easier to maintain and adjust, i.e., headset, hubs and BB. However, if you are keeping it true to vintage you might as well run them the same circa.
 

· Old, slow, and fat.
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There are some things that certainly looked nicer, but overall, weights keep coming down.

I too drool over Superbe Pro, but its hard to go back to DT shifters and 7sp FW hubs when the rest of the world's set up for S10
 

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+1 cassettes are better than freewheels. But it's not like the old stuff sucked eggs, it all worked find back in the day. I think it's just a personal pref thing; you want to go "retro" or modern?

If you're going modern, go 9 or 10 instead of 8. I have an 8 speed bike and it's getting tough to find some parts.
 

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kbiker3111 said:
Its worth making the jump from loose bearings/freewheels to cartridge bearings/cassettes for the durability and maintenance involved. But then you'd couldn't use the old der/shifters.
freewheels are probably more durable, as a class, than cassettes. not as many gears and much heavier, however.
 

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Loosescrews.com and Harris Cyclery have parts, but my 6-speed uniglide
is getting very hard to get replacements for. As mentioned, if you go 9-speed
you'll need new hubs so either new wheels or rebuild your existing rims (not worth it) and
your rear frame would have to be spread to 130mm (very carefully). I wouldn't worry
about weight that much, after all with 80's bikes, your frame is already probably
4 pounds and who cares anyway about that? The old 105 uniglide stuff works
pretty GD good and lasts a hell of a long time if maintained.
 

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drewmcg said:
freewheels are probably more durable, as a class, than cassettes. not as many gears and much heavier, however.
Freewheels may be slightly more durable than cassettes, but when it comes to the associated hubs, cassettes hubs are much more durable than freewheel hubs (no more broken/bent axles). How do you think Shimano got a foothold in the Campy dominated road market?
 

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The cogs on your freewheel are probably shot. Freewheel cogs are almost impossible to get anymore. You'll probably have to get a new freewheel. Now's the time to "upgrade" to 7 speed.
I could live with a 13-21 7 speed freewheel. I might even have to spend some time in the small ring.
 

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kbiker3111 said:
Freewheels may be slightly more durable than cassettes, but when it comes to the associated hubs, cassettes hubs are much more durable than freewheel hubs (no more broken/bent axles). How do you think Shimano got a foothold in the Campy dominated road market?
True dat. I've broken freewheel hub axles powering up very steep short hills out of the saddle.

I'm a somewhat heavy guy, but, c'mon. It was an unloaded bike every time... wasn't like I was expedition touring with 100 lbs of equipment. :(


...
 

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Bearings

kbiker3111 said:
Its worth making the jump from loose bearings/freewheels to cartridge bearings/cassettes for the durability and maintenance involved. But then you'd couldn't use the old der/shifters.
Actually, a modern cassette is no more durable than a freewheel. As far as cartridge bearings, are you aware that Campy's top hubs are ball bearings with non-contact seals? They are excellent quality, very durable, better rolling than nearly any cartridge bearing system on the market, and due to the seal design, just as resistant to contamination as the wiped contact seals that are typical of cartridge bearings.
 

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20 years ago I would get around 7,000 mile on a freewheel. Today I am approaching 18,000 on my 2001 10 speed Campy Chorus Cassette.

20 years ago I would have to repack my Campy hubs every 2,000 miles and replace bearing. Adjusting cones to ensure that the tolerences were tight but not too tight is a talent and aquired skill.

Today, I get around 7,000 or more miles on sealed bearing and they are easier than heck to take out and press in.

20 years ago I would pack and replace my crank bearings every 3,000 miles. Again, making sure the adjustments were just right was an aquired skill.

Today I get around 6,000 or so miles on my Campy UT bearing and replacing them is easy.

Headset you say. Let's put it this way, "How many brinneled (SP?) headset do you come across today?

Sure, I had a pair of Superbe Pro hubs that were as smooth as a baby's bottom. But I wouldn't trade anything to go back to those days.

But, it is fun to wax nistalgically on a time when you actually had to have skill to build and repair bikes. Todays components have almost done away with needing any skill at all.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Thanks. I think I'll go with new except for the rear hub and shifters. 6 speeds and dt will satisfy my nostalgia; The other choices can be more pragmatic. To be honest, I don't think I'll ride this bike much anyway. It's a stand-in for all of the 80s[1] autos I am too cheap to own/restore. MTB guy, but maybe I'll get hooked by the Bridgestone and become a roadie.

-Shay

[1] Sounds goofy to many, I know, but there's something special about 80's sedans to me. Ask a 5yo kid to draw a car, and he'd likely, even today, draw something which very much looks like a Caprice Classic.
 

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raymonda said:
20 years ago I would have to repack my Campy hubs every 2,000 miles and replace bearing. Adjusting cones to ensure that the tolerences were tight but not too tight is a talent and aquired skill.
Ugh, and then you put the wheel back on and things tighten up just a bit more and it's back to the drawing board. I've never needed to relace a sealed bearing on my 4.5 year old bike (figure 1500 miles a year on this bike).
 
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