Road Bike, Cycling Forums banner

1 - 8 of 8 Posts

·
2wheeler
Joined
·
34 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
A couple of years ago I met a friend that was into holistic medicine and herbs. We had a talk and I had mentioned the sinus problems that I had had for all my life and so on. She said she had something that would probably help me with my breathing on and off the bike. The next day she brought me a bottle of Cordyceps and told me to give it a try. So each day I took them as directed and noticed that my airways were more clear, infact I would get the sniffles.
After analyzing my heart rate data, as I would normally do after long rides, I noticed that my heart rate was lower...considerably lower! probably because I was able to breath so much better and my airways were clear, anyway, I know this is a LONG read but I just thought you may find it intersting. (For an interesting read go here:
http://alohamedicinals.com/Cordy_Article.pdf)


TCM practitioners also recommend regular use of Cordyceps to strengthen resistance to infections, treat colds and flues and generally improve the homeostasis of the patient. Cordyceps has traditionally been, and is still most often used for kidney and lung problems, or health issues thought to stem from the lung or kidney meridian. For example, it is used to ease a wide range of respiratory ailments such as to reduce cough and phlegm, shortness of breath, bronchial discomfort, COPD, and asthma. Modern science has confirmed the efficacy of Cordyceps for most, if not all, of the traditional uses.

Today in the West Cordyceps is most widely used by two groups of people: Athletes and the elderly. The use of Cordyceps by athletes stem from the publicity surrounding the remarkable performance exhibited by the Chinese Women’s Track and Field team at the Chinese National games in 1993. In that competition, 9 worlds records were broken, and not just by a little bit, but by startling amounts! At first the governing sports authorities suspected that some performance-enhancing drug had been used. But it was freely admitted by the team’s coach that the secret to their success was in the Cordyceps he had been giving the team! Recent research has confirmed that Cordyceps usage increase both the cellular ATP level (Guowei, 2001) and the oxygen utilization (Jia-Shi Zhu, 2004). ATP (adenosine tri-phosphate) is the molecule that actually releases energy in the cell. We talk about consuming fats, and proteins and starches to gain energy, but what it all boils down to at the cellular level is ATP. ATP releases energy in the cell
by losing a phosphate and converting from a three-phosphate form of adenosine to a two-phosphate form, called ADP (adenosine di-phosphate). When the ATP loses a phosphate, the breaking of that bond releases energy that is then available for the cell to use. An increase in cellular ATP means a real increase in actual energy, energy that is available for use. This contrasts to the perceived increase in energy such as
that which occurs from the use of CNS stimulants such as caffeine, ephedrine and the amphetamines.
While some drugs such as amphetamines may make the patient feel like they have more energy, they actually don’t. That is a CNS effect rather than a cellular effect, and it results ultimately in an energy deficiency. That is why amphetamines lead to weight loss. The brain thinks there is plenty of energy to burn and keeps going. But of course with no actual extra energy available for the moment-by-moment needs of the cell, the body is forced to draw on its reserves, the fat stores. With Cordyceps use, the double effect of increased ATP and better oxygen utilization go hand-in-hand; more fuel to burn and more
oxygen to burn it with. This is why athletes gain extra energy with Cordyceps and soldiers use it for the lessening of fatigue. It has also found favor with the elderly for much the same thing; extra energy and
easier breathing.

An interesting note is that the energy and performance increases seen with Cordyceps may be more profound in people that are less than optimally fit verses the highly trained athlete. In one recent study, Cordyceps was tested in highly trained professional athletes and, contrary to most of the other studies that have been done on the performance of non-professional athletes, it was shown to have no appreciable
effect in increasing performance. Perhaps these subjects were already optimally fit, and an increase in available ATP or oxygen utilization was of no significant physiological value to them. (Parcell et al 2004) For the rest of us though, it seems that Cordyceps could supply that bit of extra energy we need to get through our day-to-day hectic lifestyle. Perhaps we should consider Cordyceps to be the ancient herbal
treatment for the stresses of modern life.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
21,507 Posts
Let me understand

So the one relevant study shows no effects, but it's really good stuff? Help me understand your point. Your conclusion based on purely anecdotal evidence doesn't do much for me.
 

·
2wheeler
Joined
·
34 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
I'm not trying to "prove" or "disprove" anything, infact, it really doesnt concern me wether or not it has been published by some doctor here in the States stating that it IS approved or whatever for performance use. I never took it to increase my performance in the first plase :). I was just told by my friend that this MAY help me breathe a little better and it did, this I could tell from all the problems I have had in the past. Did it help me climb faster, no. Did I set a record in a TT, No. Did I claim to increase in speed, NO. I was just stating that, yes it had helped me. I was able to breathe so much better and this is coming from someone that has had chronic sinutitus since I was a kid. It got so bad I had to have surgery BUT when I took cordyceps it helped ME. I just ran across the article and thought some would find it interesting to read. If you go to the link I provided there is plenty more to read that is just plain fascinating....thats it.

PS- And as I stated it DID lower my heart rate, or maybe IT didnt, but IT DID by allowing me to breathe more freely.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
91 Posts
Tis is what I found when I started taking Cordycep too. Breathing is easier and I can keep at the red zone longer. Seems like my muscles are the limiting factor now.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1 Posts
You guys know where Cordyceps comes from, right? I'm guessing they don't tell you on the label.

It's a genus of fungi that slowly takes over an insect's body, until everything but the exoskeleton is consumed. When the insect is reduced to but a husk, the fungus bursts through the exoskeleton, alien-style, and sends out a spore-bearing stalk.

I don't know about you, but I wouldn't feel compelled to eat it even if there were a bonified clinical trial showing that it were effective.

For more grisly photos, see:

http://www.utexas.edu/courses/zoo384l/sirena/species/fungi/
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
491 Posts
That's just going to increase its appeal. A lot of cyclists are looking for a secret weapon so the more extreme or bizarre something is, the more appeal it has.


dneafse said:
You guys know where Cordyceps comes from, right? I'm guessing they don't tell you on the label.

It's a genus of fungi that slowly takes over an insect's body, until everything but the exoskeleton is consumed. When the insect is reduced to but a husk, the fungus bursts through the exoskeleton, alien-style, and sends out a spore-bearing stalk.

I don't know about you, but I wouldn't feel compelled to eat it even if there were a bonified clinical trial showing that it were effective.

For more grisly photos, see:

http://www.utexas.edu/courses/zoo384l/sirena/species/fungi/
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
91 Posts
dneafse said:
You guys know where Cordyceps comes from, right? I'm guessing they don't tell you on the label.

It's a genus of fungi that slowly takes over an insect's body, until everything but the exoskeleton is consumed. When the insect is reduced to but a husk, the fungus bursts through the exoskeleton, alien-style, and sends out a spore-bearing stalk.

I don't know about you, but I wouldn't feel compelled to eat it even if there were a bonified clinical trial showing that it were effective.

For more grisly photos, see:

http://www.utexas.edu/courses/zoo384l/sirena/species/fungi/
Fear Factor in pill form for easy consumption=p
 
1 - 8 of 8 Posts
Top