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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
how long does it take fix a flat on a tubular tire for an average cyclist (i.e., not a mechanic but rather a cyclist just beginning to use tubulars). i assume it takes a lot longer than fixing a clincher flat - 5-8 minutes if you patch and 2-3 minutes if you just use a new tube. thanks.
 

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That depends on a lot of things. How strong are you, which glue or tape did you use, which tire, etc.?

If you are talking about changing the flat at the side of the road, and therefore not gluing up the spare, the procedure is to rip off the old tire and stretch a new one on. So, maybe 5 minutes or so. But I'm not at all experienced since I've gotten so few flats. Old timers can do it so fast it would make your head spin. One minute is doable.

If you're using Tufo tires, you can always squirt some sealant in there and be up and running without having to remove the tire at all. I've been experimenting with different sealants for non-Tufo tires as I've had uneven results with Tufo's sealant. The problem is I've not had many opportunities to try it, and I hope to keep it that way.

Paul



MPH74 said:
how long does it take fix a flat on a tubular tire for an average cyclist (i.e., not a mechanic but rather a cyclist just beginning to use tubulars). i assume it takes a lot longer than fixing a clincher flat - 5-8 minutes if you patch and 2-3 minutes if you just use a new tube. thanks.
 

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MPH74 said:
how long does it take fix a flat on a tubular tire for an average cyclist (i.e., not a mechanic but rather a cyclist just beginning to use tubulars). i assume it takes a lot longer than fixing a clincher flat - 5-8 minutes if you patch and 2-3 minutes if you just use a new tube. thanks.
I have been riding tubulars for at least 15 years. That is all I ride period
It takes about 2-3 minutes to change & air up with Co2 for the front & maybe a minute ot two longer for the back to deal with the chain etc.
No biggie at all. My riding partner on the other hand takes quite a bit longer to change his tube in his clinchers. I think your off a bit on your clincher tube change times.
Most folks who change a tube in a clincher are going to inspect the inside of the case a bit so as not to puncture the new tube...not to mention opening & closing the tire bead.

Let me put it this way........I am 100% sure I can change a tubbie faster than he can change a tube in a clincher ;)
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
further questions

flying said:
I have been riding tubulars for at least 15 years. That is all I ride period
It takes about 2-3 minutes to change & air up with Co2 for the front & maybe a minute ot two longer for the back to deal with the chain etc.
No biggie at all. My riding partner on the other hand takes quite a bit longer to change his tube in his clinchers. I think your off a bit on your clincher tube change times.
Most folks who change a tube in a clincher are going to inspect the inside of the case a bit so as not to puncture the new tube...not to mention opening & closing the tire bead.

Let me put it this way........I am 100% sure I can change a tubbie faster than he can change a tube in a clincher ;)

thanks very much. how long does it take to fix the flat. let's say you have a $60 new tubular with a gash... how do you fix that other that sealant (hole too big for sealant)? can you patch it up from the inside. do you unsew it and fix it and then resew? what is the procedure to fix the hole and how long does that take? thanks!
 

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Tommasini
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About 30 minutes

MPH74 said:
how long does it take fix a flat on a tubular tire for an average cyclist (i.e., not a mechanic but rather a cyclist just beginning to use tubulars). i assume it takes a lot longer than fixing a clincher flat - 5-8 minutes if you patch and 2-3 minutes if you just use a new tube. thanks.
By the time I get out my supplies, fill the up the tire to find the leak in the sink, slice throught the base tape to then pull it up 6 inches, and cut the threads with an exacto knife - about 10 minutes so far. Remove the threads I just cut up, pull out the tube to inspect the hole and the casing. Patch tube. About 15 minutes so far. If the casing has some damage - but not a tire killing big gash, then I apply a 3" long boot from on older silk tire casing (minus thread). Stuff the tube back in and sew up - I use nylon braided fishing line (not solid nylon - nylon braided which I think is used for fly fishing?. At this point I inflate it and check my work in the sink. Then if Ok I apply contact adhesive to the casing and base tape. Go grap a beer while it drys, then stickem together. This nets out to about 30 miutes. After that it's time to glue it to the rim which is just a few minutes too.

Seem like a hassle - not really for the better ride it gives me (uh oh - I'm going to hear about that comment) and cause I only flat about once a year - and half the time it was my fault for trying to get more life out of a worn tubbie (worn tread) than I should have.

Good luck!
 

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Better than me. I'm lucky if I can get the job done in an hour. On the other hand, I only use tubulars for racing, and I only get 1 flat every few years, so it's not too bad. I would never race on a tire that had a boot in it. If I get one like that, I give it to one of my friends who still trains on them.
 

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I got a flat on one tire after 125 miles. A piece of glass slashed it through and through. Basically, the tire was trashed. But since then, I've gotten over 4,000 miles on one pair of tires with no flats at all (Conti Comps).

There's a place in Florida, I think, that will repair tubulars for $15 if you send in more than one. I had planned to do that but I still only have the one. They charge $20 for single tires. They put in a new tube and pay for return shipping, but I think I spent about $40 for the tire (last year before the dollar jumped off a building).

Here's the link:

http://tirealert.com/

I live and ride in NYC so, except maybe for the southwest with their thorns, I don't think most people should have to worry too much about getting flats.

Paul


MPH74 said:
thanks very much. how long does it take to fix the flat. let's say you have a $60 new tubular with a gash... how do you fix that other that sealant (hole too big for sealant)? can you patch it up from the inside. do you unsew it and fix it and then resew? what is the procedure to fix the hole and how long does that take? thanks!
 

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4000 miles u say

im riding/training on a pair of conti comp 22's i got last summer, do they really last that long? if so that roks :O)

purplepaul said:
I got a flat on one tire after 125 miles. A piece of glass slashed it through and through. Basically, the tire was trashed. But since then, I've gotten over 4,000 miles on one pair of tires with no flats at all (Conti Comps).

There's a place in Florida, I think, that will repair tubulars for $15 if you send in more than one. I had planned to do that but I still only have the one. They charge $20 for single tires. They put in a new tube and pay for return shipping, but I think I spent about $40 for the tire (last year before the dollar jumped off a building).

Here's the link:

http://tirealert.com/

I live and ride in NYC so, except maybe for the southwest with their thorns, I don't think most people should have to worry too much about getting flats.

Paul
 

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MPH74 said:
thanks very much. how long does it take to fix the flat. let's say you have a $60 new tubular with a gash... how do you fix that other that sealant (hole too big for sealant)? can you patch it up from the inside. do you unsew it and fix it and then resew? what is the procedure to fix the hole and how long does that take? thanks!
Oh...........gash = trash ;)

A puncture perhaps 30 minutes & yes it is a unsew fix tube & resew.... but to tell you the truth I guess I am pretty lucky because I average 2000 miles per tire & usuually change due to wear not flats.
I think it is a combination of good roads & care. Mainly keep pumped to 110-120 psi before a ride & brush the tire with my glove immediately if I ride thru some glass.

I have not repaired a tubbie in years
 

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Learn how to do a chain stitch. That's what most tubies I've seen use.
The Tufo sealant works on probably 2/3 of all simple punctures, so it's worth carrying around, but only if your tires have removable valve cores.
 
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