Road Bike, Cycling Forums banner
1 - 20 of 25 Posts

·
Windrider (Stubborn)
Joined
·
22,021 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Our company is attempting to be more environmentally friendly. To that end, we have changed ingredients, and are striving to take actions to reduce our dependence on energy.

One of the things we experiemented with was replacing light switches with motion sensors, so if you leavfe a room, after a preset time with no motion in the room, the light goes off. We installed them in one building as a test, and the savings surprised all of us. So we are rolling them out company wid............Here is where it gets good.

The light switches for the mens & Ladies room on the floor I work are outside the bathrooms.....................D'uh...they installed the motion switches this morning & the complaining and bumping around has been going on all day.

You would think that the intstaller would have asked the question.

Len
 

·
Windrider (Stubborn)
Joined
·
22,021 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Val_Garou said:
Actually, they're pee-timers designed to increase worker productivity.
Yea, but every time someone walks by the switch in the hallway, the bathroom lights go on. :eek:

Len
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,524 Posts
Val_Garou said:
Actually, they're pee-timers designed to increase worker productivity.
The outside motion sensor placement is famously called the Stall Reading Prevention System. A timing adjustment should give anyone enough time for their business without being able to get too far along on the crossword puzzle.

Our builsing has motion sensor lights in the basement hallways. The poor implementation aspect of them is that the sensors are positioned for separate light fixtures, leaving sensor gaps between the lights. It's a bit like the old Maxwell Smart walk down the long hallway, if I'm remembering that opening sequence correctly.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,524 Posts
Len J said:
Yea, but every time someone walks by the switch in the hallway, the bathroom lights go on. :eek:
The need to re-aim the sensors toward the bathroom doors, rather than at the hallways.
 

·
gazing from the shadows
Joined
·
27,288 Posts
Len J said:
Yea, but every time someone walks by the switch in the hallway, the bathroom lights go on. :eek:
They put some inside our restrooms, but set the timer for like 5 minutes. Use a stall, lights go out. Which at night or in windowless bathrooms, created some cursing of the bureaucracy for sure.

As for maintenance, they just do what they are told. Replace the switch, they replace it. Trying to send a message up the line as to why what the higher ups said to do was not a good idea might very well lead to problems for the worker. It's easier just to complete the work order (which is usually how they get rated in their job, how efficiently they complete work orders assigned to them).
 

·
Steaming piles of opinion
Joined
·
10,503 Posts
Len J said:
You would think that the intstaller would have asked the question.Len
No, I really wouldn't. He shoulda maybe, but I wouldn't have expected it at all. Even if he did, I would have expected him to go right on, getting a perverse pleasure out of the sure knowledge that he was smarter than the idiot that told him to install them. But that idiot's only error was assuming that the worker had any particular sense of pride in his work, and would either raise such issues or undertake a solution on his own.

Who me, cynical?
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
21,910 Posts
I just don't understand why companies waste time and money on junk like that when what they should be doing is focusing on their core strengths and just plain old fashioned making a profit.

Has anyone figured out what the payback time is going to be on all those fancy new fixtures?
 

·
Captain Obvious
Joined
·
11,876 Posts
ours are in the ceilings.
 

·
Mehpic
Joined
·
8,162 Posts
the management at one place i worked at actually put a motion censor in the ceiling to prevent inky darkess on long stall sessions.

so, proving that there is a chance that someone has a brain.
 

·
gazing from the shadows
Joined
·
27,288 Posts
MB1 said:
Has anyone figured out what the payback time is going to be on all those fancy new fixtures?
Since they did a test building and saw the real world savings, I would say in this case the answer is yes.
 

·
still shedding season
Joined
·
8,849 Posts
MB1 said:
Has anyone figured out what the payback time is going to be on all those fancy new fixtures?
Daily life for me... Companies won't consider anything outside of a three year payback (33% ROI, where else are you going to get that right now). Plenty busy with stuff well inside of three year paybacks too. Funny thing is that the power company is waiving around rebate money, and everybody wants to wait for that. The energy and maintenance savings are about 90% of the financial reason to do it, but people fixate on that check. Customer's always right...

Motion sensors are usually at least 30% energy savings (good conservative number). They should be set with a 10 minute timeout so they don't put extra wear on the fixture (lamps and ballast, actually). Big distribution centers (and even smaller warehouses like ours) use individual sensors on fixtures because there's no reason to turn on a long row of fixtures if someone's only going a short ways down that aisle. Savings (including maintenance for fixtures that aren't operating that many hours) is pretty amazing - well over 30%. Bathrooms are a great place for them too if they're the right sensor (and put on the correct side of the door :eek: ).

Big facilities can have six-digit monthly power bills. Just saw one last week. They're slow just like everywhere else and looking to do what they can to survive.
 

·
jaded bitter joy crusher
Joined
·
19,723 Posts
MB1 said:
I just don't understand why companies waste time and money on junk like that when what they should be doing is focusing on their core strengths and just plain old fashioned making a profit.

Has anyone figured out what the payback time is going to be on all those fancy new fixtures?
Payback time on stuff like that it typically 2-5 years. Since they have service lives of 10 years or more, you can save a lot of money.

Best practice is often to hire out a company that specializes in energy efficiency and let them deal with the studies and implementation instead of half-assing it yourself. But frequently some simple energy efficiency measures can free up a lot of money to spend on the core mission of the business.

Once upon a time I did an energy-efficiency project for a charitable nursing home and we were able to save them a lot of money, which they were able to pass on as reduced fees to their residents. When you have 80 and 90 year olds on fixed income that can make a big difference.
 

·
Motorator
Joined
·
4,166 Posts
This calls for an elegant solution which is... put candles in the restrooms. Their functionality within a place like that goes beyond just providing light. :)
 

·
What'd I do?
Joined
·
1,775 Posts
2cflyr said:
the management at one place i worked at actually put a motion censor in the ceiling to prevent inky darkess on long stall sessions.

so, proving that there is a chance that someone has a brain.
Or uses the toilet.
 

·
eminence grease
Joined
·
18,538 Posts
We did that years ago with conference rooms. Can't tell you how many times I've been in a room on a phone conference, sitting still and then finding myself plunged into abject darkness.

They crack me up.
 

·
Clear Lake, TX
Joined
·
3,269 Posts
I've seen motion detectors in individual offices. That works really well. Common areas should be on the building's timing system. Obviously, a sensor in the restrooms with a longer timer is the only way to fly.

When I worked for Rockwell a loowng time ago, we just occupied a new building. The sprinkler tech's mistakenly used pressure sensors instead of flow sensors for the automatic sprinkler alarm system.
When too many people flushed at the same time, the fire alarm went off. :D It took them a few months to discover the problem.
 

·
Off the back
Joined
·
1,850 Posts
Our motion sensors have motion sensors. Our company went ape$hit. So not just light switches, but faucets, toilets, paper towels. Replacing batteries on those suckers surely costs more than the savings. Seems like energy efficient flourescents will save more money than lights turning off. And didn't they determine in some study that it's cheaper to leave florescents on than constantly turn them off & on?
 
1 - 20 of 25 Posts
Top