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Dr. Flats a lot
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Even if I took an upgrade to a 3, I almost never have enough time to train for 70 mile races.
My going to a race with my team is like other guys going fishing with their buddies, I'm there for fun, a challange and at the end share a beer with my buddies and tell stories.
Getting home in one piece is way more important to me than an extra set of tires from a prem.
Flatting sucks.
Bike racing is incredibly dangerous.
If you really want to win, do an early breakaway.
Biomechanics, nutrition and efficiency does a lot more for your speed and endurance than aerodynamics and weight.
Smart training works better than a lot of training.
 

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Yeah, what's the big deal with prems anyway? Is it really worth the $6 pair of ugly socks the bike shop couldn't sell and has been collecting dust for 4 years?

I'm now in the process of building a "race" bike - it's an old S-Works aluminum frame I got off Craigslist cheap with old parts I have on hand or found on eBay/craiglist - so that I don't ahve to worry too much about destroying my bike and crashing.
 

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Bike racing is incredibly dangerous.
If you really want to win, do an early breakaway.
+1 to both of those. I did an early (solo) break (mile 11 of a 36 mile race) on Sat. and was astonished that I stayed away. A few miles later some guys came up to join me and we hammered to the finish.

I'll add one of my own: bike racing becomes less dangerous if you do an early breakaway.
 

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but thinking about it
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It's personal

zoikz said:
Even if I took an upgrade to a 3, I almost never have enough time to train for 70 mile races.
My going to a race with my team is like other guys going fishing with their buddies, I'm there for fun, a challange and at the end share a beer with my buddies and tell stories.
Getting home in one piece is way more important to me than an extra set of tires from a prem.
Flatting sucks.
Bike racing is incredibly dangerous.
If you really want to win, do an early breakaway.
Biomechanics, nutrition and efficiency does a lot more for your speed and endurance than aerodynamics and weight.
Smart training works better than a lot of training.
All good things for you to know, but others will fairly feel that it's "your" moment of clarity (not that you claimed these were universal truths). Flatting definitely sucks, and I value my safety, but:

As much as I like racing with my teammates and hashing it out with them, there's something I enjoy about going out as a privateer sometimes, especially when I know the pecking orders in the well-represented teams.

I enjoy hard, long road races more than any other format, and feel more satisfied with a good result in one than in anything else.

If you really want to win, go with the [i[right[/i] breakaway.

Nothing works better than as much smart training as you can handle.
 

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Captain Obvious
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zoikz said:
Even if I took an upgrade to a 3, I almost never have enough time to train for 70 mile races.
while i agree with the rest, this statement seems to say "i don't care if i am sandbagging". don't know if that's how it was supposed to come out.
 

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waterproof*
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Hey I hear ya. I like being able to be competitive on the limited amount of training that I can do with a real job and a young family. And I ride a cheap bike because, well, racing is hard on equipment. Ask the 2 cat 4's whose $3k CF bikes I saw slide out the back of a pickup on Sunday, then have the pickup's heavy spare tire bounce on them.

I got shelled at mile 10 of a 48 mile RR on Saturday, and then on Sunday, different course/conditions, I got 2nd. Sandbagger? Depends which result you look at.
 

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I race cat 4. I train 60-75mins M-F year round. my races tend to be no more than 1hr, and are mostly crits and circuit races. I can pull top 10's unless I do something stupid(which unfortunately is 80% of the time), eg: try to TT the last 1km off the front, etc. anyway, I find that really smart training is enough. I do fine in longer races as well, eg state RR race, tends to be closer to 2.5hrs. so much of doing well in races is smart training, BUT being even smarter in the race itself, and that takes time/experience, etc
 

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SO, talk a little about smart training. I am cat 5, have 8 weeks to get ready for a small stage race that has one 9 mi TT a 30 min crit and a 38 mi RR the next day. There are a couple good climbs in the RR.
I have been riding haphazardly this winter-didn't think I was going to sign up for the race and now, here I am.
 

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Dr. Flats a lot
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740 Posts
Discussion Starter · #9 ·
painful intervals

everyones training is unique, for me I find that intervals are the key. they are hard to do unless you live in a very bike friendly area (I don't) or are willing to spend a lot of time on your trainer (I am.) I'll ride on my trainer 4-5 times a week lasting about 1-1.5 hrs, and then go on 1-2 road rides with fast people. Once it gets warm out I'll do 1-2 trainer sessions a week, but will mostly ride a set 3 mile loop where I have predetermined sprint and recovery zones. I don't buy into the long slow distance thing. Plus intervals will induce testosterone and growth hormone production which in addition to the CV benefits will really improve your muscle performance.
It takes organization, reading and listening to your body to figure out how to train effectively. Most of all, it takes pain. Blinding searing pain...for brief periods, and then some recovery...then back to mind searing pain. It helps to have data. I like data. I have a power meter, but you don't need one. For the most part a Heart rate monitor works. And if you are on your trainer with fixed resistance your speed will be a good surrogate for power.
My favorite interval is the 2/1. 2 min on, 1 min recovery. I'll do stacks of 5 with 5 min recovery between. the 2 mins are at thresh-hold. Then I'll do 10 min at 85% with a high rpm. 5 min recovery then back to the thresh-hold intervals. Bring plenty of fluids and get some fast carbs in right before you start.
There are tons of threads about this. Some pretty decent books. Chris Carmichael IMHO is a bit of a jerk, but he knows his stuff. His DVD's will run your through a lot of stuff like this, and his books will help you design your own training plans, nutrition etc...
 

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Captain Obvious
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zoikz said:
Once it gets warm out I'll do 1-2 trainer sessions a week, but will mostly ride a set 3 mile loop where I have predetermined sprint and recovery zones.

don't you get bored to tears on such a short loop? intervals sure do help when you can't put in the hours.
 
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