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I have developed a very interesting situation this year. I obtained a new frame for my triple road bike during the winter and switched it out with the old frame. Same size and same geometry so we basically took the setup and components from the old frame and duplicated it on the new frame. From the measurements, I can see the new frame is set up exactly the same as the old frame.
I started riding my mountain bike at the beginning of April for 3 weeks without any issue. Also rode my double road bike a few times in April / early May, again without issue.
After getting into shape for 5 weeks I took out the triple and did 2 mountain ride in a week, I noticed that my Achilles tendons were sore the next day after the ride? Did some mountain bike rides the past 2 weeks, no problem. Took out the triple on Tuesday and did a 40 mile ride in the hills and had another bout of pain in my Achilles tendons? The next day my tendon were extremely sore. I have never had pain in my tendons in 25 years of cycling. All we did was swap out 2 identical frames, the bike is set up exactly as the old one. I was riding my other 2 bikes with no problem.
Both of my Achilles are very sore, so something is definitely wrong somewhere. The only thing of note is that my triple has toe clips, I have clipless pedals on my double but for whatever reason I kept the original platform pedals on the triple.
What can cause Achilles pain? I feel absolutely 100% comfortable on the bike, we just switched the frame, it's essentially the same bike with a carbon frame as opposed to an aluminum frame.
Any advice would be greatly appreciated. Thanks in advance.
 

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You and/or a good physio is going to have to determine exact cause of your pain, but here are some general observations.

The Achilles tendon is active in the plantar flexion (toes down) and dorsiflexion (toes up) of your foot. If you flex your foot through a large range of motion during one pedal revolution, you are putting constant stress on the Achilles tendon. The force component of this stress is determined by where your foot is on the pedal. Pedaling with your toes produces very large stress forces. Pedaling with your heels puts no stress at all on the Achilles tendon. I'm sure your foot is on the pedal somewhere between these two theoretical extremes, but it might be of some help to move your foot forward on the pedal (cleats toward the heel on the shoes; toe clip shimmed out with a piece of wood on your traditional pedals).
 

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Might be your fore-aft saddle position relative to BB

Had the same issue this spring. Thought I had the new ride dialed in to the millimeter but had focused on saddle to handlebar positioning, seat height and seat position on the seatpost vs old position/bike.

Took a plumb bob to the tip of my saddle and found that it was nearly 2cm behind the BB compared to what I had been riding on the same size older frame. Made the appropriate adjustments but still had to do stretching and one-legged reverse toe-lifts for two weeks before tendonitis went away (start at the up-use two legs to go up-slowly lower single leg to stretched position. As strength increases and pain decreases switch to regular full toe raises) . Been pain free through half a season of racing and commuting since.

Good luck. Found lots of useful articles on tendonitis from a google search at the time.
 
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