Road Bike, Cycling Forums banner

1 - 20 of 54 Posts

·
Tourist
Joined
·
987 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
It seems that flat-mounts are made for 140/160 front, 140 rear, that's it. Flip the orientation of the fork adapter for 140 or 160. Now, how can I use 180 in front?? Is there a flat-mount adapter for this?? Apparently there's an adapter for the rear to use a 160 instead of a 140, so I guess it could be mounted on the fork adapter? Two adapters, that sounds super ugly and many screws. Is there a one-adapter solution for 180mm? Thanks -
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
427 Posts
Flat-mount calipers are not meant to be run with 180mm rotors, so anything you cobbled together would be compromise or hack.

Like Nova, I have to ask: why not just run a 160mm rotor?
 

·
'brifter' is f'ing stupid
Joined
·
15,347 Posts
As the previous guys posted...what's the thinking behind a 180mm rotor? If you actually 'need' a 180 rotor to slow yourself down what you really need is a different bike. There is no good way to put a 180mm rotor on a bike w/ flat mount calipers.
 

·
Tourist
Joined
·
987 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
Whether I need a 180mm rotor is irrelevant. I was asking the question out of genuine interest. It is possible to use 180mm with post-mount brakes, so it would make sense to be able to do it as well with flat-mount brakes. What a surprising design, that this is not possible.

By the way, not so long ago, people were saying that disc brakes in general didn't make any sense on road bikes. Other people were saying that wide tires are 'slower' etc...
 

·
'brifter' is f'ing stupid
Joined
·
15,347 Posts
Whether I need a 180mm rotor is irrelevant. I was asking the question out of genuine interest. It is possible to use 180mm with post-mount brakes, so it would make sense to be able to do it as well with flat-mount brakes. What a surprising design, that this is not possible.

By the way, not so long ago, people were saying that disc brakes in general didn't make any sense on road bikes. Other people were saying that wide tires are 'slower' etc...
Uhmmm no. Flat mounts are pretty much specifically for road bikes. The design and engineering is such that 160mm is the largest rotor that everyone involved is comfortable putting on a road bike. The stopping power generated is good for the majority of riders. If you increase the size of the rotor you increase the leverage created by the brake system on the frame and fork so you'd need to increase the strength of both. To answer your question...again...no, it's not possible to do it safely. I won't make any comments about whether you (think you) need a 180 or not.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
627 Posts
Whether I need a 180mm rotor is irrelevant. I was asking the question out of genuine interest. It is possible to use 180mm with post-mount brakes, so it would make sense to be able to do it as well with flat-mount brakes. What a surprising design, that this is not possible.

By the way, not so long ago, people were saying that disc brakes in general didn't make any sense on road bikes. Other people were saying that wide tires are 'slower' etc...
I didn't really care why you wanted to do it until you made a big deal out of not wanting to explain why you wanted to do it, now I'm really curious.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
I didn't really care why you wanted to do it until you made a big deal out of not wanting to explain why you wanted to do it, now I'm really curious.
Well, I just picked up a 18 Kona Rove NRB.
I weigh 245 lbs.
Yeah, I'd like to lose some weight which is another reason I got the bike.
160 is nowhere near enough to stop my fat ass.
Lots of people in my situation.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,830 Posts
Well, I just picked up a 18 Kona Rove NRB.
I weigh 245 lbs.
Yeah, I'd like to lose some weight which is another reason I got the bike.
160 is nowhere near enough to stop my fat ass.
Lots of people in my situation.
160 is plenty. 140 is fine as well.

Unless you are running really wide tires, like 40mm or larger and carrying a touring load, the issue is going to be tires breaking contact when the brake works great.
 

·
'brifter' is f'ing stupid
Joined
·
15,347 Posts
Well, I just picked up a 18 Kona Rove NRB.
I weigh 245 lbs.
Yeah, I'd like to lose some weight which is another reason I got the bike.
160 is nowhere near enough to stop my fat ass.
Lots of people in my situation.
160 will work. If it doesn't get a different brake set up.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
860 Posts
Well, I just picked up a 18 Kona Rove NRB.
I weigh 245 lbs.
Yeah, I'd like to lose some weight which is another reason I got the bike.
160 is nowhere near enough to stop my fat ass.
Lots of people in my situation.
On a bad day I weigh the same as you.

I ride gravel and road in a hilly region, and I have 10k plus miles on 140/140 and 160/140 and have not had an issue. Even with quick emergency stops. As someone else said, in that situation, you are probably going to lock up a tire, regardless of the size of the rotor.

The one scenario you probably need to be careful of is really long descents where you have to stay on the brakes for an extended period. Just be aware of this, use good technique to keep the brakes cool, and don't get in over your head. You should be fine.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
Hmm....I am running cable disc (TRP Spyres).
I am also running wide tires but can't come anywhere near stopping on a dime.
Not even close.
Maybe I'm expecting too much of a "road bike".
Looking at changing pads perhaps.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,659 Posts
Hmm....I am running cable disc (TRP Spyres).
I am also running wide tires but can't come anywhere near stopping on a dime.
Not even close.
Maybe I'm expecting too much of a "road bike".
Looking at changing pads perhaps.
Have you braked hard enough? to the point that the front tire is almost skidding? Practice this hard braking technique in a straight line. If you've clamped on the front brake lever as hard as you could (ie., you're appling all 4 fingers) and you still cannot get the front tire to almost lockup and skid in a straightline, only then would you need to consider going to a more power brake setup.

now to lessen the chances of you folding the front wheel under hard braking, you should perform the above test in a series of increasing speed attempts, this will allow you to feel and hear how the tire is behaving. If you sense that tire is about to lock and skid, just release the front brake and you'll roll out it safely.

but I do think that guys in your weight category is better off with an 180mm rotor though.
 

·
'brifter' is f'ing stupid
Joined
·
15,347 Posts
Hmm....I am running cable disc (TRP Spyres).
I am also running wide tires but can't come anywhere near stopping on a dime.
Not even close.
Maybe I'm expecting too much of a "road bike".
Looking at changing pads perhaps.
I'll bet a dollar your brake isn't set up correctly. You can go from very powerful to won't do a damn thing in less than 10mm of cable if you don't adjust them correctly.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
627 Posts
Hmm....I am running cable disc (TRP Spyres).
I am also running wide tires but can't come anywhere near stopping on a dime.
Not even close.
Maybe I'm expecting too much of a "road bike".
Looking at changing pads perhaps.
Your problem isn't rotor size. Plenty of big guys do just fine on 160.

Either you need new pads and a rotor cleaning, your bike is brand new, or your brake just isn't set up properly at all. Any one of those will cause you to not have the power and modulation you should, and that's totally independent of rotor size.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
I created an account to specifically support your efforts with a search for a 180mm flat mount fork adapter. These other responses are pretty elitist at best (if you don’t have something or constructive to say, keep your keyboard to yourself). I am also on the search for a 180MM front rotor for increased modulation and additional heat dissipation for long, aggressive descents. I haven’t found anything out there for SRAM, but Shimano seems to have one. Good luck with your search!




Whether I need a 180mm rotor is irrelevant. I was asking the question out of genuine interest. It is possible to use 180mm with post-mount brakes, so it would make sense to be able to do it as well with flat-mount brakes. What a surprising design, that this is not possible.

By the way, not so long ago, people were saying that disc brakes in general didn't make any sense on road bikes. Other people were saying that wide tires are 'slower' etc...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,346 Posts
I am also on the search for a 180MM front rotor for increased modulation and additional heat dissipation for long, aggressive descents.
Increasing the rotor size will not increase modulation, and may actually decrease it. Also, difference in surface area between a 140mm rotor and a 160mm rotor is negligible (do the math), so that won't affect heat dissipation. And the OP started this thread over two years ago so I bet he or she has moved on from this topic.

But hey, welcome and thanks for joining! This place is a ghost town. Yeah, some posters can be acerbic but there's a lot of knowledge you can get from this site.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
Increasing the rotor size will not increase modulation, and may actually decrease it. Also, difference in surface area between a 140mm rotor and a 160mm rotor is negligible (do the math), so that won't affect heat dissipation. And the OP started this thread over two years ago so I bet he or she has moved on from this topic.

But hey, welcome and thanks for joining! This place is a ghost town. Yeah, some posters can be acerbic but there's a lot of knowledge you can get from this site.
I got a noticeable increase in modulation and power when I went from 180 to 200 on my downhill mtn bike. All good. Thanks for nice reply and feedback. I am always looking to learn and figure out new ways to send it! Happy/safe riding out there!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,346 Posts
I got a noticeable increase in modulation and power when I went from 180 to 200 on my downhill mtn bike.
Sure, you'll get more 'power' by increasing the diameter of the rotor. To be extreme, imagine applying an equal force to stop a tiny 100mm rotor versus a giant rotor closer to the outside diameter of the rim. Which one will stop you better with the same amount of force applied? Car manufacturers have long took advantage of this - the bigger the rim diameter, the larger the rotor they can use. And it's possible to over-engineer the bike. You don't want 230mm rotors on a road bike.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
Sure, you'll get more 'power' by increasing the diameter of the rotor. To be extreme, imagine applying an equal force to stop a tiny 100mm rotor versus a giant rotor closer to the outside diameter of the rim. Which one will stop you better with the same amount of force applied? Car manufacturers have long took advantage of this - the bigger the rim diameter, the larger the rotor they can use. And it's possible to over-engineer the bike. You don't want 230mm rotors on a road bike.
Perhaps this was the wrong forum for the question as my application is a gravel bike that use largely road bike parts. I routinely hit 15-22% grades and long steep descents in Northern California. Any help with confident, reliable braking is welcome.
 
1 - 20 of 54 Posts
Top