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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Long story short, I did my first sprint tri a few weeks back. While it went well, my arms were pooped from the swim so I'm beginning to see the benefit to a more aero position and leaning on my elbows -vs- tradition road riding position. My short term (summer 2017) goal is olympic length and my long term is an Ironman 70. By that time, I will invest in a full on aero bike. For now, I just want to try this out and the $89 price tag seemed like a cheap investment. I'm currently riding a '12 Specialized Tarmac that I've been professional fit to:



My riding position isn't insanely aggressive, but it's not upright either. My bars are currently level to the ground. I've spent nearly 4 seasons on this bike so I can say that I'm completely used to and comfortable with it.

I guess my question is for those that have done this. Did you have to play with saddle position much or did you leave it be. Does a road bike require height risers or stock rise ok?

Just looking for some overall thoughts I guess.
 

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Forever a Student
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Other's may disagree, but I feel that with clip on bars the idea is to change nothing on the road bike.

You install the clip on bars however you need to in order to achieve this. This may mean having the bars run under your handlebars or over. Whatever you have to do in order to leave the rest of the bike the same, plain and simple.

Also, not to threadjack or anything but you might want to read the following link regarding your seatpost.

Best soft-riding rigid seatposts for road, dirt, and gravel - BikeRadar USA
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Other's may disagree, but I feel that with clip on bars the idea is to change nothing on the road bike.

You install the clip on bars however you need to in order to achieve this. This may mean having the bars run under your handlebars or over. Whatever you have to do in order to leave the rest of the bike the same, plain and simple.

Also, not to threadjack or anything but you might want to read the following link regarding your seatpost.

Best soft-riding rigid seatposts for road, dirt, and gravel - BikeRadar USA
Thanks for that advice. I installed them yesterday and found what you said to be absolutely correct. I didn't need to adjust a thing. I got the bars mostly dialed in but I think I'm just going to have to hit the road to make sure got them 100% where I want them.
 

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Adorable Furry Hombre
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The whole point of aero bars is to make you as aerodynamic as possible. Which is the most saddle/bar drop you can tolerate with your torso as low/flat as possible to sustain without compromising leg-power....raising your bars is exactly the opposite of what you want to do. Further, you need to make certain your handlebars are rated for clip-on aerobars, many of the lighter-weight CF/alloy bars are not.

Lastly. If you're triathloning....work on your transitions. You see tons of people on $5,000-$15,000USD specialist TT bikes that lose a minute+ on the transition because they buy the gear but not the smarts to optimize their transitions.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
The whole point of aero bars is to make you as aerodynamic as possible. Which is the most saddle/bar drop you can tolerate with your torso as low/flat as possible to sustain without compromising leg-power....raising your bars is exactly the opposite of what you want to do. Further, you need to make certain your handlebars are rated for clip-on aerobars, many of the lighter-weight CF/alloy bars are not.

Lastly. If you're triathloning....work on your transitions. You see tons of people on $5,000-$15,000USD specialist TT bikes that lose a minute+ on the transition because they buy the gear but not the smarts to optimize their transitions.
I did't raise my bars, they stayed right where they were originally.

I'm currently running aluminum Ritchey EvoCurve bars, which seem to be fine for mounting aero bars. I also torqued everything down to spec.

I consider this more of an experiment than anything. I'm still not set on how far I want to take the triathlon thing so I'm testing the waters to see if I even like riding in that position for a period of time. If I do proceed with this, I'll definitely get a designated aero bike. For now, I didn't consider the $85 cost to be that big of a deal.
 
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