Road Bike, Cycling Forums banner
1 - 8 of 8 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
34 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Does anyone know if there is a recommended setup adjustment to compensate for different femur lengths? When I ride I noticed that there is a different feeling (signifigant enough to be annoying) between my left leg and my right, almost like my cleats aren't evenly setup. I set my right cleat/leg to be KOPS, and adjusted the left identically, yet it still feels wrong. I measured my femurs (as best I could locating the ends of the bones), and it appears my left is 1/4 inch longer then my right. While I would of never thought 1/4 inch would of made a difference, I have found very small adjustments in setup do, so maybe 1/4 inch is enought to notice.

It feels like I should move my left cleat forward, but I'm not sure this adjustment makes sense, since the left leg is already longer. Don't really know how I can get both legs KOPS if the femur is different lengths.

Any suggestions would be appreciated.

Thanks
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
59 Posts
This may sound weird, but try pointing the nose of your saddle a little to the left. This essentially puts your right "sitbone" fractionally closer to the vertical plane of the BB, and your left "sitbone" the same distance back. This MAY compensate for the difference in femur lengths... I tried it and really noticed a difference in comfort on the bike. YMMV.

Steve

P.S. KOPS is only a starting point. I slide back on climbs and forward when really spinning, which changes my KOPS by over an inch every time I move. And I move around a lot :p !


mortman said:
Does anyone know if there is a recommended setup adjustment to compensate for different femur lengths? When I ride I noticed that there is a different feeling (signifigant enough to be annoying) between my left leg and my right, almost like my cleats aren't evenly setup. I set my right cleat/leg to be KOPS, and adjusted the left identically, yet it still feels wrong. I measured my femurs (as best I could locating the ends of the bones), and it appears my left is 1/4 inch longer then my right. While I would of never thought 1/4 inch would of made a difference, I have found very small adjustments in setup do, so maybe 1/4 inch is enought to notice.

It feels like I should move my left cleat forward, but I'm not sure this adjustment makes sense, since the left leg is already longer. Don't really know how I can get both legs KOPS if the femur is different lengths.

Any suggestions would be appreciated.

Thanks
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
59 Posts
Shim under cleats will work when the difference in length is in the lower leg - another of my problems :eek: ! The original post indicated a diference in femur (thigh) length...

I know, I'm a freakin' mutant!
Nessism said:
What about a shim under the pedal cleat on one side? Depending on what brand of pedals you use this should be fairly easy.


Ed
 

·
scruffy nerf herder
Joined
·
4,484 Posts
Well, you can try many things....

And most of them wont work. Most people that have slight differences actually will change angle in their knee or ankle to make up for the difference and never really know it. Plus, you are looking at only a quarter of an inch and that potentially could be a measurement error. So, honestly, I would avoid major shims... I also have seen people suggest getting a longer or shorter crankarm... whatever. The seat turn is an interesting angle, but looks like something that may compound some back issues and potentially screw up the other leg at the same time.

An interesting story, if Im not mistaken... go rent or purchase the 1997 set of Fleche Wallone and Liege-Bastone-Liege.. and in the first race, I believe I remember Phil and Paul discussing Luc le Blanc having a surgery in 1996 to correct a injury he suffered as a child that left one leg some TWO inches longer than the other. And there he was racing in 1997. And he became pro a LONG time before that... so I think you will likely be fine with your slight deformation. At maximum, I might consider a custom orthotic for the shoe on your short leg.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,840 Posts
You might check out Le Wedge...

Le Wedge (formally know as Big Feet Wedges) are wedges that you place under your cleats. They allow for alignment and can compensate for leg length descrepanices. I don't use them, but I have considered using them. I think in order for them to work right you have to have them professionally installed by a trained technition. Kinda pricey, I think it runs about $70.00 or so. I would think twice about installing wedges by yourself as if you don't have a major problem you might do more harm than good. Most people have leg length differences. My right foot compensates by pronating when I am applying a lot of pressure when I am climbing. I don't have any problems otherwise, but the Le Wedges might make my pedaling more efficient. A good bike wrench might be able to install them also (I dunno)...worth taking a look at anyway.

http://www.cyclefit.co.uk/lewedge.htm

Dino
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
679 Posts
I currently have a 1 cm leg length discrepency as a result of breaking my femur 6 months ago. While doing rehab on my trainer, I found that I couldn't generate enough leverage from my short leg. Lowering the post by a centimeter helped the short leg, but did not feel too good for my other leg.

My short-term solution was to get a 5 mm lift made for my short leg. The lift fits into my cycling shoe and extends out to the ball of my foot but not to the toes. Luckily, my current shoes are roomy enough for the insert. The insert cost $15 at an orthotics place. 5 mm is the maximum they could do without an assessment and note from my doctor. The lift has made a notable difference both on the trainer and on the road. I've been using it on a near daily basis for the last month.

My long-term solution will be to get an assessment from the orthotics store and look at a combination lift and moldable shoe insert. (Custom orthotics are out of my price range.)

Hope this info is helpful to you.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
679 Posts
I should add that you should really do what feels best for you. If you feel it will help, get an inexpensive lift made and see if it helps.

My surgeon felt it wasn't necessary to compensate for a 1 cm leg length discrepancy, but I sure as hell felt the difference on the bike.
 
1 - 8 of 8 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top