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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Ok, crazy or not, I've been seriously thinking of doing the FC508 on a fixed gear bike. While training for this, riding up (and down) 4,000 foot climbs in my trusty 41x16 gear (with rpms down in the 20's), I get some knee soreness for a few days after. Based upon someone's advice here, I've arranged for an examination and consultation with a sports doc next Monday, to check my condition (no pain right now) and get advice on whether and/or how to do this.

My question is, what should I ask this doc to ensure he gives me all pertinent info about training lots on the fixed gear bike and racing a 508 mile event (with 35,000 feet climbing) on a fixed gear? Any ideas?

The goal here is to do the event, and train and strengthen my legs/joints to handle the stress, if possible. However, I also want to know the risks of doing this, both immediate and long term. If there is no way to do it without permanent damage, then I want to know that, too. Any experience with something like this?

Thanks for any input.

Doug
 

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One Thought --

DougSloan said:
Ok, crazy or not, I've been seriously thinking of doing the FC508 on a fixed gear bike. While training for this, riding up (and down) 4,000 foot climbs in my trusty 41x16 gear (with rpms down in the 20's), I get some knee soreness for a few days after. Based upon someone's advice here, I've arranged for an examination and consultation with a sports doc next Monday, to check my condition (no pain right now) and get advice on whether and/or how to do this.

My question is, what should I ask this doc to ensure he gives me all pertinent info about training lots on the fixed gear bike and racing a 508 mile event (with 35,000 feet climbing) on a fixed gear? Any ideas?

The goal here is to do the event, and train and strengthen my legs/joints to handle the stress, if possible. However, I also want to know the risks of doing this, both immediate and long term. If there is no way to do it without permanent damage, then I want to know that, too. Any experience with something like this?

Thanks for any input.

Doug
I won't pretend to have the answer to this one, but I have an idea on who to ask -- surf over to www.Roadbikerider.com and e-mail your question to them. Their panel of experts (Ed Pavelka (sp?), etc.) have enough extreme experience to be able to opine on how to approach this.

Did you sort out your "downhill" issue on the fixie?
 

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You didn't say where the pain is located in your knee. If it is at either side, look at your cleat alignment or get pedals that allow your foot to float. If it is at the front of the knee, it is usually either tendonitis or inflamed cartilege, and it is probably from overtraining.

When that happens to me, I rest, use ice and ibuprofen until the pain is completely gone, then return to training. I use ice and ibuprofen after every workout on hills, even if my knee is completely pain free. I do long steep hills, intervals on hills, and acceleration intervals, but only a couple of times a week at most. When I do intervals, I time them or watch my speed. When I slow down two intervals in a row, I quit. (There is not much training benefit of intervals once you begin to slow down.) The idea is to build strength and power as quickly as possible, before my knee becomes inflamed.

BTW, I think fixed gear is good for my knees, because it forces me to build strength and to vary my riding position and cadence.

My experience with doctors has been that they will only tell you to rest, sometimes for long periods. See a doctor anyway, if only to get a prescription for anti-inflammatory drugs and a referral to a physical therapist. PT's will help you minimize and work around injuries.

Good luck. EM
 

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Doug, come up here and get your knees looked at/examined by Dr. Testa and Dr. Heiden at the UCD sports performance clinic.

They are arguably the most knowledgable cycling surgeons in the world, and only 3 hours away.

Plan an entire day on it, get the tests/bike fits/exams at the clinic. In most cases, insurance will cover it.

Seriously, you'll thank me later. PM me if you get it going, we can go for a quick ride/have lunch.
 

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midnight melon mounter
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I don't think this is a job for a doctor.

I would consult a certified trainer. I have a poor opinion of orthopedists' ability to prevent or heal "nagging" type sports injuries. A sports trainer will understand that you ARE going to complete this event, and their job is to help with pain management. A doctor will view the event itself as the problem.

Alex
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
thanks

I emailed Fred Matheny. I'll forward the response when I get one.

Good idea about the Heiden guys. They certainly ought to be able to tell me what I need to know. I'll start with my local doc, and go to them if I'm not satisfied.

Thanks.

doug
 

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DougSloan said:
I emailed Fred Matheny. I'll forward the response when I get one.

Good idea about the Heiden guys. They certainly ought to be able to tell me what I need to know. I'll start with my local doc, and go to them if I'm not satisfied.

Thanks.

doug
Doug, the UCD guys are the real thing. Max Testa is the former team doctor for motorola, mapei, and now coaches 3 members of Fassa.

If you go to his office you're bound to run into Tyler, Levi, Shonny, Gina Hall, Alison Dunlap, or any number of US pros....most all the big names go see him, especially during this season for "tune ups".

Not only is he the best general practitioner I've ever been to (my "physical" was over 4 hours, and he even walked me over to the blood center personally to show me where it was), he's a sports orthopedist (licensed and certified). AND a cycling doctor and coach to all the boys.

Trust me, the stories from the peleton are more than enough to keep you there.

http://www.athleticamps.com/whoweare.html#staff_massimotesta
 

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Doug,

Let me save you a bit of time and money. Don't grind away your knees riding a fixed gear up and down 4000 foot climbs. You may do alright for a while but it's likely to catch up with you. Infrapatellar tendonitis, chondromalacia patella, osteoarthritis, Baker's cyst ... you name it. You ARE doing permanent damage to your knees. It may not show up right away, but do it long enough and you'll pay for it.

When I first went into practice, I found it hard to tell people, "Don't do that." But it's often this simple advice that is most beneficial.

Bradley C. Sikes, DC
 
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