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Shuffleman
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I have decided to buy a workstand to make life easier as I am tired of working on the bike upside down. I have heard a lot of good and bad about everything that is not Park. I have scoured CL for over 2 months and nothing has come up. I guess that I will go new instead since I have no choice. My immediate need is to remove my mtb groupset and put a new one on there. That will be about the most severe thing that I do. I am sure that it will be routine maintenance for the most part.
Thus, I have narrowed it down to these 3 and would like some advice:
1) Spin Doctor Pro G3 Work Stand
I would not pay retail for this one. I would wait on one of their better sales and pull the trigger.
2) Park Tool PCS-10 Home Mechanic Work Stand
I have seen this for less on places like Amazon.
3) Feedback Sports Sport-Mechanic Repair Stand


I have seen all of these but never used any of them. They all look good but the Feedback sports looks like the most well made to me. Since I have never used any of them, I thought that I would check with those that have.
 

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If you'll be using it on bikes with aero seatposts, the Park grabs the post the right way, front to back. The other two would grab it side to side. I find the Park cam crank mechanism very quick and easy to use and prefer it over the type the other two have.
 

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Forever a Student
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I think they're all bad.

I think any stand that has to clamp a tube or seatpost or whatever is bad.

I think the only stands worth paying money for are the ones that attach at the dropouts with quick releases.





The feedback ones are known for tipping over, so take that into account. It's due to the three legs and how far apart/long/whatever they are. I use the Park PRS-21 personally and it's fine.
 

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that looks absolutely useless to me! You need to have the wheels on for setting up most things. wow. I like to rotate the frame into any position too for BB and headset work. and how does it handle thru axles I wonder

I use a stand similar to the Performance one, bought for $150 or so. simple and works. Only alu seat posts for me anyways. here it is, made by Feedback. wide stable tripod type https://www.feedbacksports.com/shop/sport-mechanic-work-stand/
 

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that looks absolutely useless to me! You need to have the wheels on for setting up most things. wow. I like to rotate the frame into any position too for BB and headset work. and how does it handle thru axles I wonder

I use a stand similar to the Performance one, bought for $150 or so. simple and works. Only alu seat posts for me anyways. here it is, made by Feedback. wide stable tripod type https://www.feedbacksports.com/shop/sport-mechanic-work-stand/

You leave one wheel on, usually the back unless you need to take the fork or something off. Never seen a pro mechanic work on a bike? These are the stands the pros use. As for thru axles, you just get the thru axle attachment point with correct spacing instead of the quick release one. You can tilt it to work on the BB too...

And your stand is known for tipping over too. Too wide and too low for the legs if you don't have a leg under the bike.
 

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And your stand is known for tipping over too. Too wide and too low for the legs if you don't have a leg under the bike.
Structurally that is incorrect. A wider stance of 3 legs makes it more stable, not less. The flatter angle only becomes an issue if the post to leg connection has play in it to where it starts to act like a hinge and thus allowing the post to sway.

Both types of stands will get the job done and pro mechanics use either style.
 

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that looks absolutely useless to me! You need to have the wheels on for setting up most things. wow. I like to rotate the frame into any position too for BB and headset work. and how does it handle thru axles I wonder

I own a stand similar to the Performance one, bought for $150 or so. simple and works. Only alu seat posts for me anyways. here it is, made by Feedback. wide stable tripod type https://www.feedbacksports.com/shop/sport-mechanic-work-stand/
I own both the Feedback Sprint (the red one pictured in MMsRepBike's post), and a Park PSC 10.

I haven't used the Park stand since I bought the Sprint.

The Sprint takes up less floor space, is easier to use, is more flexible and I feel a lot more comfortable wrenching on my bike with it secured that way than I do with it clamped by a tube.

As far as thru-axle, it comes with everything you need for thru axle or QR mounting. I mount my Norco Search with Thru Axles all the time. It works perfectly.

You can mount the bike by the front fork dropouts, or by the rear dropouts (if you need to work on the front).
 

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Structurally that is incorrect. A wider stance of 3 legs makes it more stable, not less. The flatter angle only becomes an issue if the post to leg connection has play in it to where it starts to act like a hinge and thus allowing the post to sway.

Maybe you'll believe this guy? He doesn't say might or could, he says will.

https://youtu.be/3oaGmE97B5Y?t=1m
 

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I have the PSC 10 and love it. That being said, I'm a light wrencher and really don't need what the others have posted. If you're the same as me, go with the Park. If not, I'd listen to the advice MMsRepBike and Migen offered.
 

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You leave one wheel on, usually the back unless you need to take the fork or something off. Never seen a pro mechanic work on a bike? These are the stands the pros use. As for thru axles, you just get the thru axle attachment point with correct spacing instead of the quick release one. You can tilt it to work on the BB too...
Not this pro but I suspect that you don't mean a mere bike shop mechanic.

The shop stands don't count as they are all the clamp style Park stands, but I have/had 3 Park stands at home. The PCS-1 and the PRS-25 are clamp style stands, and the PRS-20 is a Euro style. Since getting the PRS-25 the PCS-1 is used substantially less, but prior to that the PCS-1 was my primary stand. I tried the PRS-20 and found it only slightly better than flipping the bike over on it's handlebars and seat. It is now gone.

A big part of the stand preference is what you are used to, and I'm accustom to the clamp stands. The Euro style stands just don't work for me, and tend to get in the way when I've used them. I see no good reason I should remove a wheel just to stabilize the bike for a quick adjustment.
 

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I have seen the pros using those type. But not for mtn bikes. And not for any serious shop work! They only use those weeny travel racks for quick adjust, clean setup at the races. makes me nervous not having a wheel in there waiting for someone to hit the front hydro disk brake and push out the pistons (yeah I know, put in the widget to stop that). And you can't secure the frame if there isn't a headset and fork installed yet either - nice to have a stand to hold the frame while I set the cups and install the BB.

all things being equal, I like an old school Park shop stand (i wrenched for 10 years in various minor and major shops), but these folders are super convenient and more easily moved around inside a home.


The three legger is OK, like you say put one leg under the bike. I had to do some serious hard work last year getting out the stuck seat post in my old Italian racing frame. nice to have it firmly attached and tilted down 90 degree so I could work away with a sawzall cutting out the seriously stuck post, successfully. Bike stand earned its keep on this job! I mean how else could the frame be secured to do this?

Two of my bikes are titanium, so no worries clamping right to the bare metal tubes.





after





 

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If you'll be using it on bikes with aero seatposts, the Park grabs the post the right way, front to back. The other two would grab it side to side. I find the Park cam crank mechanism very quick and easy to use and prefer it over the type the other two have.
That's the reason I went with the Park. I bought it about a year ago, no problems at all so far.
 

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'brifter' is f'ing stupid
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I think they're all bad.

I think any stand that has to clamp a tube or seatpost or whatever is bad.

I think the only stands worth paying money for are the ones that attach at the dropouts with quick releases.





The feedback ones are known for tipping over, so take that into account. It's due to the three legs and how far apart/long/whatever they are. I use the Park PRS-21 personally and it's fine.
As far as I'm concerned the Feedback stand is the one. I've used Park, Tacx, and custom stands. Feedback is the class of the field. I rarely work on mtb's but they wouldn't be a problem w/ this stand. Very high quality, very stable, easy to break down. I've relegated the Park PRS to bike washing duty. Anyone that thinks this type of stand is 'absolutely useless' obviously doesn't work on bikes very much.
 

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I've got the PRS-20 as pictured above and like it (the PRS-21 is the light weight version of same). Someone asked about TA's, they have a TA adapter 1728TA and 1729TA(new) depending on what size thru axles you are dealing with.
 

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Maybe you'll believe this guy? He doesn't say might or could, he says will.

https://youtu.be/3oaGmE97B5Y?t=1m
1.) He also said that Park uses LONGER legs to remedy the tipping he does not like with the Feedback stand.

2.) He also said it happens when you have a particularly heavy bike.

3.) He also said, a couple times, the front dropout mount style stands are great if you "only work on road bikes". (Which is not correct)

Given orienting the bike in relation to the legs on a stand is not hard to do, the Feedback stand is a viable option.
 

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I have a Feedback Sprint stand and an old seat post clamp stand. Although it's very nice, I basically never use the Sprint stand as the seatpost stand is so much more convenient to use for most routine things like checking and airing up the tires, lubing the chain, quick checks and adjustments of the drivetrain, inspecting/adjusting brakes... For many of these I just hang the bike over the stand clamp by the nose of the saddle. There's always one of my bikes in the stand. I do prefer the Sprint stand for some projects, like working on cranks/bottom bracket, and assembling bikes.
 

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I have a Feedback Sprint stand and an old seat post clamp stand. Although it's very nice, I basically never use the Sprint stand as the seatpost stand is so much more convenient to use for most routine things like checking and airing up the tires, lubing the chain, quick checks and adjustments of the drivetrain, inspecting/adjusting brakes... For many of these I just hang the bike over the stand clamp by the nose of the saddle. There's always one of my bikes in the stand. I do prefer the Sprint stand for some projects, like working on cranks/bottom bracket, and assembling bikes.
I do all the simple stuff that you said with the bike on my stationary trainer. I have the feedback sports spring stand and it's fantastic for more complex work such as changing cranks/bottom bracket or running internal cabling. The sprint style stand is also much better if you have a bike with aero shaped tubing as there is no good place for a clamp to go. It also eliminates any chance of crushing the seatpost/down tube/top tube of a carbon bike.
 

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'brifter' is f'ing stupid
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1.) He also said that Park uses LONGER legs to remedy the tipping he does not like with the Feedback stand.

2.) He also said it happens when you have a particularly heavy bike.

3.) He also said, a couple times, the front dropout mount style stands are great if you "only work on road bikes". (Which is not correct)

Given orienting the bike in relation to the legs on a stand is not hard to do, the Feedback stand is a viable option.
^This^ I think the my Feedback stand is much more stable than the Park we have. It's pretty easy to set things up so there is no (or greatly reduced) chance of tipping over.
 

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As far as I'm concerned the Feedback stand is the one. I've used Park, Tacx, and custom stands. Feedback is the class of the field. I rarely work on mtb's but they wouldn't be a problem w/ this stand. Very high quality, very stable, easy to break down. I've relegated the Park PRS to bike washing duty. Anyone that thinks this type of stand is 'absolutely useless' obviously doesn't work on bikes very much.
OMG say it isn't so...............you know everything.............

As for stands, I'm way jealous of my buddy's Feedback stand. I have the spindoctor. It was a gift and it works, but I've had to modify it a tad. If it broke today, I would not buy another spindoctor.
 

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I have the feedback sprint. I'd buy it again. Outside of running new cables around the bottom of the BB shell, I can't think of any other maintenance that is easier on a conventional stand. Plus normal cleaning and lubing is much easier on the feedback - you can spin the bike around without moving or fighting to get the right position relative to the bike stand being in the way.

I picked it for two reasons:
1) I don't want to clamp carbon things (seatposts, frames, etc.). Way back in my wrenching days, I did not like clamping frames in a stand b/c that risks scratching paint and/or decals.

2) the feedback comes with thru axle adapter that replaces the skewer. The park does not include a thru axle adapter. So, the park required more $.

Falling over is less of a concern on this type of stand. The bike is held centered over the legs - as opposed to offset from the center of the legs in a conventional seatpost gripping stand.

Granted, I would not leave my bike perched on the stand on a windy day. But, I have no concern of the stand unexpectedly toppling over. I had one of those old park two legged portable stands. I never moved away from the bike on the stand. I have seen those topple over with a gentle breeze or on less than perfectly level ground.
 
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