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I know, I know no joking on this thread, but here are some etiquette tips I found that are funny as hell and have a slight amount of truth:

1. If you pass an unaware cyclist: When passing another cyclist, there's a good chance she does not know you are behind her. If you say "Hi" as you go by, you may startle her, prompting her to fall off her bike (I have in fact actually caused a bike accident this way). If you ring your little bike bell, you may startle her similarly. If you ride by without saying anything, you will be thought of as inexplicably rude. What should you do? Speed up and yell "TRACK!" or "LEFT!" and blow by as impressively as possible.

2. If you encounter a cyclist coming from the opposite direction: Cyclists are required by law to aknowledge one another, primarily to express solidarity and a shared love of the sport. You don't have long, but try to convey, with a simple gesture, "Hey, we're both on bikes and are therefore morally superior to the people currently in cars." But you've got to be casual about it. If you are riding in an upright position (mountain bike, cruiser), it's fine to lift your hand and wave. If you are on a road bike and have your hands on the hoods, lift the fingers of your left hand, without removing the hand from the hoods. If you are in the drops, a simple bob of the head will suffice.

3. If you encounter a cyclist on a recumbent bicycle, in either direction: Spurn him. Do not aknowledge, and do not return aknowledgment if offered. Recumbent cycles are nothing more than a desperate plea for attention, and by acknowledging him, you become an enabler. Do not enable silliness, even if it works. Above all, do not express appreciation/admiration/interest in the recumbent cycle---even if you want one desperately.

4. If you pass someone during a race: Do not say, "How's it going?" because the honest answer the person you're passing would have to give is, "Not as well as I previously thought." Instead, say, "Looking strong, dude," because it makes you sound generous, while at the same time implying that if your vanquished foe is looking strong, you are looking even stronger. It's all about psychology.

5. If you are passed during a race: Don't give an excuse belittling your opponent's accomplishment (e.g., "My spleen hurts." or "I'm coughing up blood"). Instead, say, "Rock on, dude." It makes you sound like a good sport, not to mention a hep cat.
 

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This comes up a couple times in here, bears repeating --

Actually ensure you can change your tire and get back on the road with the tools you carry. Don't assume they're going to work. That bag under the seat is an "Emergency Kit" and needs to be maintained.

Check tire pressure before EVERY ride. But you should also check out the whole bike before you jump on it and ride. Having the "wheels come off" at speed can get you killed. One reason road bikes are traditionally spotlessly clean is because cleaning the bike allows you to check over every little item -- cracked frames, loose nuts, frayed cables, uneven wheels/rims, brake releases in released position . . .
 

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Useful for me:

1: When I am biking when there is cold outside (around +8 degree Celsius or less),
I usually fill up a glass of water and let it be in my room before I am leaving.
More comfortably to drink water who has roomtemperature (+20 Celsius) that the
cold water right from the fridge! It helps me to drink faster too.

2: check regulary that the wheels are true. Avoids accident and breakdown out there.
3: Check regulary that all of the screws and nuts are sitting firm. Anything can happen!

4: Use thermos bottle to keep the water warm and at stable temperature.
To drink +4 degree (ice and water) in 0 degree or less is awful.
Easier to be dehydrating in such cold weather when the water is cold.
I use 0.5 liters thermos bottles, these fit right in my bottle holder.
it is always nice with cocoa/coffee at the long trips in the winter.
Truly relaxing to drink hot coccoa after 7 hours in -7 degree Celsius! :D

5: Try to NOT loose those (expensive) thermos bottle. (I usually does that.) :(

6: Learn to know your own brakes. Learn to use the front brake.
Learn to know the ground and the feeling when the front wheel is slipping.
Then you releases the brake level a little. That help's a lot. Believe me.

Locking the back wheel does not help much.
The brake effect is at maximum when the both of wheels are at the slighty locking level, but still rolling slowly as possible without slipping.

Experience is always a good thing. Learn to hold your brakehandle correct so you can
brake effectly (I did that mistake first time, and braked weakly to avoid chrashing in a car!)

7: have fun!

8: When cycling with heavy bagage, try to have the most of it AT the bike, not at your back.
More comfortable and one can be cycling longer/faster and be less tired.
Believe me, 15kg at your back is not nice after one hours! :D
if it is halfed down to 6-7kg, it would be much easier. Believe me, it is a big difference.

9: Learn to know your own body. Feel your legs. Be patient and careful if they are weak or in pain.

there! any comments?
 

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Ive only got one year and 2,000 miles on my bike's clock, but the one piece of advice I could give someone is the following:

NEVER listen to the yahoos who blurt out "If youre not riding for at least X hours or X miles, its not doing a thing and isnt 'worth it'."

Yeah...it would be GREAT if we had multiple hours to drop down 30-50 miles each day. But LIFE (and these days, less daylight) seem to often get in the way. If all youve got is 45 minutes to bang out 15 miles then take it, make the best of it and enjoy! Whatever your fitness level is, 45 minutes of good excercise is NEVER a bad thing, no matter what those snooty big shots tell you.
 

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Darn Right

Lesson #1:

It is cheaper to diet than buy lightweight bike part.-- or a light bike for that matter.

Get a bike that fits, don't worry about the weight until you're fast. Otherwise you are throwing your money away.

But if a new bike catches your fancy....... well we all have a weakness.

:)
 

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Tip that may have been over looked

Many new riders have to deal with saddle sore.

A couple of things to keep in mind:

High end shorts won't help.

Saddles with lots of padding actually hurt you in the long run.

Seats with the hole in them are questionable.

Just ride a little bit shorter but more often and you'll find that the pain goes away.

Good luck.
 

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when being overtaken by a car from behind you, never ever assume its A car, assume its AT LEAST ONE car, possibly more. if not, you sometimes have a notion to move out into the lane and another car could be there.
 

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1.) Buy and use chamois cream/balm when ever you ride. You will thank yourself.

2.) Take AT LEAST two tubes with you. Always. Even if you are only going out for a 1 hour recovery ride.

3.) Make eye contact with drivers. You have know idea if they know you are there, unless you make eye contact.

4.) Buy a good frame pump. Micro pumps are small and light and all, but they suck for filling up tires.

5.) Use hand signals.

6.)Always have cash, ID, and a cell phone on you.

7.) A tire at 110psi is faster, and more comfotable, than a tire at 130psi. Did I mention that it is faster?

8.) If you are going to leave your bike in a black vehicle on a hot day while you go for a post race beer, let the air out of the tires.

9.) A helmet is useless unless it fits you properly.

10.) Buy new cleats every season. It makes your pedals feel new again for little money.
 

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Ist post ever: No flaming!

mtbbmet said:
7.) A tire at 110psi is faster, and more comfotable, than a tire at 130psi. Did I mention that it is faster?
Thank you for all the good tips. I'm curious: I can believe the "more comfortable" but I always thought higher pressure meant less rolling resistance, and is therefore "faster."

Please explain the error in my thinking!



:confused:

Thanks,
motobacon
 

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My 7 cents

Don't overinflate the tires in an attempt to lower rolling resistance because you're guaranteed to get a flat along an imperfect road.

When approaching a hill, switch to a lower gear than is immediately necesssary; one that will be appropriate when you're in the middle of the hill so that your cadence never slows

Bike seats should be horizontal. Period.

Raise the saddle if you are experiencing discomfort in the front of your knees. Lower the saddle if you experience pain in the back of your knees.

Make sure to exercise and stretch the hamstrings because the quads are usually overdeveloped in riders and injury can result from the imbalance.

Incorporate running into your regimen because weight-bearing exercise strengthens your bones. Alot of pro-riders don't like to walk or climb stairs because their muscles have become so specialized.

Should you win a stage race, shake the champagne vigorously and wet the podium girls; they like that...and you might get lucky.
 

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1.) cleats are dangerous on the slick concrete/tile floors in public restrooms.
2.) take one small bite of your energy bar every 15mins- eating the whole thing at once will upset your stomach.
3.) as you're riding "out," make mental notes of where water is available so that when you're riding "back," you'll know where to re-fill your bottles.
4.) learn how to bunny-hop. it's more useful than you think, and people think it's really flippin' cool to see a roadie bunny-hop over a soda bottle at 25mph.
5.) always smile and say "MORNIN'!" to people that you see, whether they are walking, jogging, or on bikes.
6.) if you are planning on getting off of your bike and going indoors, whether it is a store or a friend's house or whatever, stop and check your face in the side mirror of parked car to make sure that you don't have snot hanging off your nose or something.
7.) "cappuccino" flavor Powerbars stick to the wrapper like glue.
8.) remember that what you do will affect the public's opinions of all cyclists.
9.) people in cars cannot see cyclists. they just can't.
10.) don't forget to have fun.
 

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1. Make sure the bike fits. You'll enjoy riding more and stay with the sport longer.
2. Be steady: keep your line, don't vary your speed suddenly when riding within a group, pay attention to what's happening around you.
3. Drink!
4. Cinelli cork bartape is very comfortable.
5. I've seen more people fall down riding SPD pedals than anything else (couldn't unclip).
6. Smile, wave to people and say hi. Be courteous.
7. Learn how to draft correctly.
8. Clean the bike. It's happier and faster that way.
9. Get good tires and wheels. While Continental Grand Prix tires are not my favorite, you can't go wrong with them. Veloflex tires come off the rim very easily if you have a flat (very seldom with these tires). Velocity rims are very strong. Buy wheels suitable to your build and riding style.
10. There's a reason for helmets. Protect your noggin. You never know when you're going down.
 

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some great advice here- surprisingly, though, group-riding skills/etiquette haven't really been touched on yet, so allow me:

-If you're relatively new to group riding, stay on the left side of the back, away from the curb. You'll stay more clear of pot-holes, dips in the pavement and debris, and you won't feel trapped between other riders and the curb.
-Don't overlap wheels when drafting. Keep your tire a bit to the left or right of the rider in front of you, but with your wheel 2 or 3 inches behind that rider's tire as well
-If you're leading a pack on a descent, DO NOT use more brake than absolutely necessary.
-Keep your upper body loose and relaxed- if you're squeezing the life outta your bars with tension, youre not able to pull off quick direction-changes
-Point out pot holes, garbage, w/e, when in a pack. This is not so much a courtesy as a necessity when those behind you can't see the road.
-Don't freak out when other riders bump into you lightly while riding, this is normal. Some more experienced riders may literally "push" you on a tough climb. accept the help gratefully.

some other stuff: for the totally clueless noob, take your visor off your helmet if it's a mtb helmet. All it will give you is a back neck-ache from having to crane your neck to increase your field of vision. If you're trying to save money, do it on the jersey or the helmet, not the shorts. Camelbak's are for mountain bikes.
 

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I haven't seen this listed yet... What about your LBS?

This might have been listed, but I didn't see it....

Unless you are a master mechanic, develop a good relationship with your Local Bike Shop.
But at the same time, don't use them to change a flat for you, they are pros and doing simple things like fixing flats is just wasting their time. When you need a great mechanic it will be worth all the extra 10 minutes of gabbing with them on a weekly or monthly basis. TRUST ME.
 

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It surprises me...

...nobody said it's always a good idea to keep a presta/schraeder adapter with them. Here's the scoop. I keep a mini-pump...say what you will...which works well in getting the tube pretty much inflated. When I reach the first gas station I use the adapter and fill the tire as needed. Most of the time I am close...within 20psi always. It works for me...but then I AM one of those ex-MTB'ers that carry 10 pounds of tools.
 

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When putting on tires, line up the label with the stem. That way when you get a flat and find the hole in the tube you know where to look on or in the tire to see if there is a rip or even glass still in the tire.
 

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Someone posted:

9 Spare batteries for your MP3 player

Should you really ride with a iPod? I haven't even bought my bike yet (still in the "am I really going to use it enough to justify a mortgage payment" phase), but is seems like common sense that you will want to be able to hear things around you. I wear the iPod while i run, but I also run on sidewalks or jogging paths, and need not worry about that idiot in the Excursion with the cell phone tucked under their chin reaching around to smack the misbahving youngster or dog.
 
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