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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I’m looking to upgrade the bike I've had for the last 5-6 years, a Giant Cypress DX. I’ve narrowed it down to three, all of which I really like. I’m sure I’d be happy with any of these …… but I wondered if anyone has any input they think I should consider. The three are the Specialized Crosstrail Disc, the Cannondale Quick 4 and, the one I think has a slight edge right now, the Marin Fairfax. I’ve ridden them all and they all feel great. I’m weighing factors like the dealers’ proximity to my house and bennies they offer (the Cannondale dealer gives free maintenance service for as long as needed – very attractive).</SPAN>

I’m 62yo, 6’0” and weigh about 190. I’m a recreational rider, and the vast majority of my riding is on paved trails found throughout the city where I live. I think all these bikes offer great comfort, which is something I hope for – and also the ability to move on the occasions when I want to be more aggressive.

So ... any special knowledge of these models, or tips on what I should look for or consider? Any help is appreciated. I hope to make a decision fairly soon, but I'm having a hard time differentiating among these excellent bikes.</SPAN>
 

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Since you're mostly on paved roads, a suspension fork on the bikes you're currently considering, is not going to be one of great quality and it won't be of much good use. The only suspension system actually required on paved roads, involves your seat, frame, and tires. A rigid fork will make your bike a more efficient machine on pavement. Therefore, I'd only recommend either the Cannondale Quick 4, or the Marin Fairfax.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Great input, Zeet. Actually, the suspension fork was probably the main reason I kept the Specialized in the running. It seemed like an advantage ...... but you make great points. I'd never thought about that making the bike less efficient on pavement. Appreciate it.
 

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Great input, Zeet. Actually, the suspension fork was probably the main reason I kept the Specialized in the running. It seemed like an advantage ...... but you make great points. I'd never thought about that making the bike less efficient on pavement. Appreciate it.
Great, JohnKal! Glad I could have helped. You also might wanna take a close look at the Jamis Coda series, before actually pulling the trigger! :thumbsup:
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Great, JohnKal! Glad I could have helped. You also might wanna take a close look at the Jamis Coda series, before actually pulling the trigger! :thumbsup:
I had never heard of Jamis, but I keep seeing their name come up -- favorably -- in the forums here. I checked and found a dealer here in Oklahoma City, actually one not far from my house, and one I've been familiar with for years. I will go check it out. Oh ..... do you, or anybody else, have any thoughts about disc brakes vs. conventional?
 

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I had never heard of Jamis, but I keep seeing their name come up -- favorably -- in the forums here. I checked and found a dealer here in Oklahoma City, actually one not far from my house, and one I've been familiar with for years. I will go check it out. Oh ..... do you, or anybody else, have any thoughts about disc brakes vs. conventional?
Yes. The cycling community as a whole, has been doing quite fine, without the use of disc brakes. However, if you plan to ride under wet or slippery conditions very often, disc brakes will be of great value to you. Also, if you cycle on paved hill roads, disc brakes can absolutely assist you better on downhill descent braking. Otherwise, standard brakes will do just fine!
 

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My opinion is that thay have finally figured out a way to obsloete everyones frameset. Discs are generally not needed on the road. Generally.

I will probably go that route.
 

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Just a note regarding disc brakes, I have been riding for 30 years and have never had a problem stopping my bike when needed. The last 20 years of my cycling has taken place in coastal California which has every type of descent you can think of and I ride in the mountains all the time. We don't get a lot of rain here, but when it rains it's usually not that cold so I have been out in wet weather quite a bit, no problems. That's not to say that disc brakes would not be advantageous on long wet descents but I have managed.

I also ride a bit in Central Illinois' flat farmland where my folks live. I think the last time I was back there I did a 25 miler without using my brakes once!
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Great, appreciate all the input on disc brakes. My experience on a test ride was that they didn't seem to grip as well as conventional brakes .... I wasn't impressed. I thought maybe it related to their being new and maybe they'd settle in to be amazing or something, but I don't think there's any reason I'd need them.

I went by the lbs [I'm trying to pick up the lingo ... :)] and looked at Jamis. They don't really carry the Coda but they had Allegro which they'd deal a little bit on and get it in my price range. Now, they didn't have a 19" built, so I have to go back in a day or two to actually ride one. It looks impressive and feels nice. I'm excited to get a ride on it soon.
 

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Great, appreciate all the input on disc brakes. My experience on a test ride was that they didn't seem to grip as well as conventional brakes .... I wasn't impressed. I thought maybe it related to their being new and maybe they'd settle in to be amazing or something, but I don't think there's any reason I'd need them.

I went by the lbs [I'm trying to pick up the lingo ... :)] and looked at Jamis. They don't really carry the Coda but they had Allegro which they'd deal a little bit on and get it in my price range. Now, they didn't have a 19" built, so I have to go back in a day or two to actually ride one. It looks impressive and feels nice. I'm excited to get a ride on it soon.
Looks like you're beginning to really get your feet wet, JohnKal. Just remember to take your time and don't be too anxious to pull the trigger, until you've test ridden a whole bunch of bikes. Go around to as many LBS as you can and ride as many hybrids as you can. Ride both aluminum and steel. Decide for yourself, which one feels best to you. Also, if that Jamis dealer carries the Allegro, he also has access to Codas, too. The Coda is an award-winning hybrid! :thumbsup:
 

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Looks like you're beginning to really get your feet wet, JohnKal. Just remember to take your time and don't be too anxious to pull the trigger, until you've test ridden a whole bunch of bikes. Go around to as many LBS as you can and ride as many hybrids as you can. Ride both aluminum and steel. Decide for yourself, which one feels best to you. Also, if that Jamis dealer carries the Allegro, he also has access to Codas, too. The Coda is an award-winning hybrid! :thumbsup:
After you've selected the right frame material for your bike. The next items of concern should be the best components that can be purchased within your budget. Shimano hybrid hierarchy goes like this: Tourney-->Altus-->Acera-->Alivio-->Deore-->DeoreLX-->SLX--> XT-->XRT (the best)..I personally prefer Alivio or greater.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Looks like you're beginning to really get your feet wet, JohnKal. Just remember to take your time and don't be too anxious to pull the trigger, until you've test ridden a whole bunch of bikes. Go around to as many LBS as you can and ride as many hybrids as you can. Ride both aluminum and steel. Decide for yourself, which one feels best to you. Also, if that Jamis dealer carries the Allegro, he also has access to Codas, too. The Coda is an award-winning hybrid! :thumbsup:
Well, the dealer told me they used to carry the Coda, but the Allegro is an upgrade ("better components," he said) and their experience was that almost everybody was willing to pay the slight amount to get the upgrade to the Allegro. I'll have to research those two ....... but much of what I research flies over my head. I don't intend to make any snap decision, but I've been at it for, mmmm maybe a month now, and I definitely have it narrowed down. Since my knowledge set isn't the greatest, I'll probably just have to go with what feels best ... and I'll be happy with that.
 

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Well, the dealer told me they used to carry the Coda, but the Allegro is an upgrade ("better components," he said) and their experience was that almost everybody was willing to pay the slight amount to get the upgrade to the Allegro. I'll have to research those two ....... but much of what I research flies over my head. I don't intend to make any snap decision, but I've been at it for, mmmm maybe a month now, and I definitely have it narrowed down. Since my knowledge set isn't the greatest, I'll probably just have to go with what feels best ... and I'll be happy with that.
Well perhaps going with your gut will be best, if that will make you feel better, JohnKal.... Good Luck! :thumbsup:
 

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However, I must say... I wouldn't buy that upgrade story. :rolleyes:
The Coda Comp cost less than the Allegro Comp, but has either equivalent components, or better. Also, it will outlast the Allegro by at least a decade or two. If you want aluminum, then go with the King of aluminum. Cannondale! :thumbsup:
 
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