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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Before you get too vocal over the obvious faux pas here, spare a thought for the skill involved in keeping it together enough to get the bike off the road



Happy to report there were only a couple of minor scratches.
 

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Yup, he didn't bring anybody else down with him and was able to and just barely get the bike into the grass, where it appears he applied too much brake and endo'd. He probably had time to get back on the road, but that's hard to judge and do sometimes. Had he had a lot of mt. bike time, he might have pulled it off.

The lack of other participants says well for the handling skill of those behind him.

And I may be wrong but they look like they're doing maybe low 20's at best, but I wasn't there.

Wasn't the finest example of riding skills I've ever seen and if ever anyone needed to actually SEE why you don't ride the aero bars in a paceline, well here it is.

SB
 

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turtle killer.
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Assuming those spokes busted during contact (and I am from the sound), that's a hell of a job keeping it upright as long as he did.
 

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All I'll add, since I've said my peace in the other thread is this....If you are not comfortable in your aero bars while in a paceline...don't race in TTT's.

I've been part of 3 OBRA state championship TTT teams and have been in a rotating paceline at over 30mph for much of the race...all on TT bikesand in the aero bars the whole race, aside from the corners (last year averaged just over 28 mph for 27.3 miles).

Just because some people can't do it, doesn't mean everybody can't do it....I'm done with this thread :D
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Steve B. said:
Yup, he didn't bring anybody else down with him and was able to and just barely get the bike into the grass, where it appears he applied too much brake and endo'd. He probably had time to get back on the road, but that's hard to judge and do sometimes. Had he had a lot of mt. bike time, he might have pulled it off.

SB
By that time his wheel had turned into a 700cm floppy pancake. I don't know if he braked but it's just as likely the wheel locked up on the brakes

Steve B. said:
And I may be wrong but they look like they're doing maybe low 20's at best, but I wasn't there.
SB
Yea, I admit it looks slower but the lead guy looked at his speedo right beforehand, that's where I got the 34 from. It's also a downhill and leading up to the last sprint of the ride - will have to revisit to confirm...
 

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Wookiebiker said:
All I'll add, since I've said my peace in the other thread is this....If you are not comfortable in your aero bars while in a paceline...don't race in TTT's.

I've been part of 3 OBRA state championship TTT teams and have been in a rotating paceline at over 30mph for much of the race...all on TT bikesand in the aero bars the whole race, aside from the corners (last year averaged just over 28 mph for 27.3 miles).

Just because some people can't do it, doesn't mean everybody can't do it....I'm done with this thread :D
Need I remind you about the '09 TDF TTT? :p Between BBox and the Australian corner, not sure if I've seen the absolute cahrnage like that.
 

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Teach me how to Bucky
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Steve B. said:
Yup, he didn't bring anybody else down with him and was able to and just barely get the bike into the grass, where it appears he applied too much brake and endo'd.
SB
He was doing good until he hit the gravel driveway. The wheel sinks in slightly which suddenly adds to the braking forces and lets the front brake lock.

Another 20 feet of grass and he would have got it stopped upright.
 

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duh...
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the lesson there is 'don't overlap wheels'... the surprise header at the end was entertaining
 

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Rub it............
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It doesn't look like he had his hand on the front brake hood at all. He still had it on the aerobars. I think he broke a spoke or 2 and combined with the detour off road, the wheel snagged on the front brake and flipped him.
 

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There was no skill involved here. He allowed himself to overlap wheels, and suffered the consequences when the leading rider changed his line.

He was certainly lucky to stay upright. Had he been on his hoods or drops with both hands, this may not have happened as he would have been better able to adjust his speed. Just another reason not to use aerobars on group rides, but more importantly: This video shows exactly why you shouldn't overlap wheels.
 

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mmm beer said:
Before you get too vocal over the obvious faux pas here...
Which one? There were a few.

1) Lead rider (camera boy) did not pull off to the right when there was plenty of pavement. Not sure if it was time for him to pull off, if number two guy was impatient or if camera boy was coasting downhill while in the lead position (which is a No No).
2) Number two rider pulled around the leader (camera) instead of waiting for the elbow wag to pull through, thus making the entire paceline deviate from its course. In addition he went way wide almost to the center line instead of passing closely.
3) New number two rider (in black) was too impatient to let the new leader settle into a pace and looked like he was trying to swoop around and pass him, thus deviating from his line and hooking our unlucky victim.
4) A few more spokes (like 32) in the wheel and the victim may have kept it upright.
5) But of course the real Loser is the victim stupid enough to be in his aerobars in the middle of a paceline. Too bad, so sad.

capt_phun said:
Just more proof to avoid Tri-geeks. No using aero extensions in the paceline!
Yeah, the bad thing is they often suck in and out of the aerobars.
 

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duh...
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Keeping up with Junior said:
Which one? There were a few.

1) Lead rider (camera boy) did not pull off to the right when there was plenty of pavement. Not sure if it was time for him to pull off, if number two guy was impatient or if camera boy was coasting downhill while in the lead position (which is a No No).
2) Number two rider pulled around the leader (camera) instead of waiting for the elbow wag to pull through, thus making the entire paceline deviate from its course. In addition he went way wide almost to the center line instead of passing closely.
3) New number two rider (in black) was too impatient to let the new leader settle into a pace and looked like he was trying to swoop around and pass him, thus deviating from his line and hooking our unlucky victim.
4) A few more spokes (like 32) in the wheel and the victim may have kept it upright.
5) But of course the real Loser is the victim stupid enough to be in his aerobars in the middle of a paceline. Too bad, so sad.



Yeah, the bad thing is they often suck in and out of the aerobars.


tri-geeks (bottle behind saddle, sleeveless jersey)- what were you expecting???
 

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This really doesn't seem like a skill issue. You have to have access to a brake if you're riding close other bicycles. He didn't, everything snowballed from there.

Wookie, do you paceline without access to brakes like this?


BTW, the dude's front wheel locked up - that was no pothole.
 

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Wookiebiker said:
All I'll add, since I've said my peace in the other thread is this....If you are not comfortable in your aero bars while in a paceline...don't race in TTT's.

I've been part of 3 OBRA state championship TTT teams and have been in a rotating paceline at over 30mph for much of the race...all on TT bikesand in the aero bars the whole race, aside from the corners (last year averaged just over 28 mph for 27.3 miles).

Just because some people can't do it, doesn't mean everybody can't do it....I'm done with this thread :D
TTT's are a different animal. First, as everyone is on a TT bike, everyone is more focused on riding smoothly. Second, you typically practice as a team and are more diligent about communication (e.g., about which direction you are pulling off, whether you are going to echelon/cross-wheels to draft, etc.) Third, most TTT's are on smooth courses with minimal turns and need to alter your speed quickly. I do TTT's but would never ride my TT bike in the aero bars in a group ride paceline.
 
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